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Archive for Monday, July 8, 2013

Archery center hits the bull’s-eye

Wyatt Forshee, 15, Tonganoxie, steadies himself as he takes aim on a target during a Junior Olympic Archery Development class on Saturday at Overton’s Archery Center, 1025 N. Third St. Wyatt is one of a tight group of young people taking interest in the sport.

Wyatt Forshee, 15, Tonganoxie, steadies himself as he takes aim on a target during a Junior Olympic Archery Development class on Saturday at Overton’s Archery Center, 1025 N. Third St. Wyatt is one of a tight group of young people taking interest in the sport.

July 8, 2013

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Charlize Tate, 14, became interested in archery after reading books like “The Hunger Games.”

About a year ago she went to Cabela’s, in Kansas City, Kan., purchased a bow and target, and taught herself to shoot.

Sean Urban, 10, Oskaloosa, has to use a bit of force to remove one of his arrows that narrowly missed the center of his target.

Sean Urban, 10, Oskaloosa, has to use a bit of force to remove one of his arrows that narrowly missed the center of his target.

A few weeks ago, Tate joined Overton’s Archery Center's Junior Olympic Archery Development club after her mom read an article about the North Lawrence business.

“We’re teaching these kids the same way Olympic coaches teach,” said Liz Rice, the team coordinator. “It’s very easy to learn the basics and it’s very hard to get to the level of an Olympian, but it’s all about consistency. ... If you put the work in and practice, there are opportunities to take it on to a higher level.”

Rice helped start the group because her son, Kit Rice, wanted to participate in archery but the only team in the area practiced in Olathe. When Overton’s opened in February, it was an opportunity to start a youth archery club based in Lawrence. The club was formed in May. About 20 youths participate in the club, and for the past six weeks, popularity has grown with at least one new student joining every week.

Every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., the club meets to practice shooting as a group. Members are instructed in archery etiquette, safety, vocabulary and basic shooting techniques.

One of the most important things the kids do, from Rice’s perspective, is create friendships and learn to communicate with others. The members of the club are from different schools and towns in Douglas County, and they range from elementary to high school age. Even so, they’re all good friends, brought together by their interest in archery.

“We certainly have kids from all backgrounds — from kids who grew up wearing camo to girls coming in with high heels,” Rice said. “It’s amazing that these kids from different backgrounds can stand out here and talk the same language and understand.”

Students can participate in JOAD whether they already know how to shoot or have never touched a bow, Rice said. Participants don’t have to own equipment, and they can pursue archery as a leisure activity or competitively.

A lot of the appeal of archery is that it isn’t expensive, said Rice. Anyone can rent equipment — including a recurve bow, arrows, an arm guard and finger tab — for $5 and use the shooting range all day for $10.

Eric Green said he bought his 9-year-old son, Wyatt, a compound bow and asked him whether he wanted to join JOAD a few months ago. Since then, Wyatt spends most of his free time either shooting at home or at Overton’s. Wyatt is a top shooter at the center, and Eric says part of it is because of the help of the staff and his training with the club.

The coaches for all JOAD teams are trained and had to complete specific certification classes.

Wyatt’s training is helping him to become competitive, but Eric said it’s helping him to become more social and outgoing, too.

“When he first came he was really quiet,” Eric said. “But he’s 9 and he’s talking with a 14-year-old; he’s making a lot of friends.”

JOAD is for archers ages 8-20. To learn more, call Overton’s Archery Center at 832-1654 or visit the store.

“It’s fun and it’s not really hard to learn,” said Tate. A plus: Her friends think it’s cool.

Comments

Tammy Copp-Barta 1 year, 5 months ago

You need to come check them out! They are great! Lots of selection also if you're looking to purchase archery equipment and they also can do birthday parties and scout events. Liz, Bill, Jude and John are great to work with!! Our daughter has been shooting since March and loves it!

Chris Golledge 1 year, 5 months ago

Cool, and I should not critique, but the lefty (or at least left-eye dominate person) in the photo should have the knock between his index and middle finger. I'd slide the armguard up a bit to the fat part of the forearm as well; that is the most likely spot to get hit by the string.

50YearResident 1 year, 5 months ago

Looking at the picture, it looks like an incorrect hold of the arrow and bowstring. What do others think? No bulls eye there with that shot.

Mark English 1 year, 5 months ago

Yeah let's all put that kid down for going out and having a good time. Seriously? This isn't what I expect from fellow citizens of Lawrence. Leave it alone.

fragment 1 year, 5 months ago

Actually, he's shooting the bow correctly. It's far easier to get a clean release with all 3 fingers under the arrow. It is the US Archery (the USOC-sponsored target archery organization) standard for teaching new shooters.

As far as the location of the arm guard, you would need to see the brace height of the bow (the string at rest) in order to know how it is correctly or incorrectly positioned.

The gents at Overton's are qualified instructors and excellent shooters. They have an extensive knowledge of the sport and teach using the latest techniques. Attending classes and receiving coaching there is probably the best way for a local to get quality instruction to enter the sport successfully.

I started shooting with very similar form in the same program about 16 years ago. I've since gone on to be a member of the US Junior World Archery Team and win gold medals in international competition. JOAD is a excellent program that originated for youths, but has been expanded in recent years to accept adults as well.

I would encourage anyone interested in archery to check out the program and the archery center.

50YearResident 1 year, 5 months ago

Thank You, It is never too late to learn a new procedure. I learned from the "old School". And congratulations for winning the gold medals!

Chris Golledge 1 year, 5 months ago

I sit corrected. Old school as well, before locking knocks were common and you had to kind of pinch them between your fingers to get them to stay on the string.

A bit pedantic, but the string can't get to the wrist without traveling past the elbow, and the thickest part of the arm will be hit or nothing.

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