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Archive for Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Letter: Flawed tax code

January 16, 2013

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To the editor:

The governor has warned that the unanimous ruling of the judicial panel could lead to drastically higher property taxes for Kansans. (“Level of school funding ruled unconstitutional,” Journal-World, Jan. 12.).

The governor refuses to acknowledge that his tax policies are at the heart of the issue. He refuses to be accountable!

Let us be clear: It is the governor’s and the Legislature’s appropriation and taxation decisions, not the ruling of the court! The governor fails to acknowledge the solemn agreement he and members of the Legislature took to uphold the constitution and the laws of the state (words to that effect). The governor and the Legislature have deliberately and intentionally abrogated the constitution by refusing to provide funding consistent with making “suitable provisions for the finance” of public education, as required by law.

Gov. Brownback, not the courts, will be responsible for imposing higher property taxes, one of the most regressive forms of taxation. We must hold the governor and the legislators accountable for higher property taxes.

It is Gov. Brownback’s decisions not to provide state funding for schools, with the help of very “conservative” Republican legislators. These decisions are part and parcel of the fundamentally flawed restructuring of the Kansas tax code designed to impose drastic cuts, not just to education but to virtually all services needed by our most vulnerable citizens.

Surely, the unanimous ruling by the judicial panel is not a surprise to the governor. The court is merely holding the governor and the members of the Legislature accountable. That is the function of the courts!

Comments

Paul R Getto 1 year, 3 months ago

He refuses to be accountable!

Not true. Muscular Sam is accountable to his Cult's strange little jesus-person. You know, the union-busting businessman. Read up on Doug Coe. His group has been training the Governor since the 1970's..

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Alyosha 1 year, 3 months ago

You have a great day yourself, too, SouthWestKS!

Of course, in our system of government, the legislature appropriates spending. So the governor can't really "cut" spending.

Here's from the Chicago Tribune on how we got into this mess:

"A funding plan was devised for Kansas in 2006 through a settlement of a prior lawsuit but the groups filed suit again in 2010 when the state made an estimated $300 million in funding cuts. The state made even more cuts in 2011. There have been $511 million in cuts to the base funding between fiscal year 2009 and fiscal 2012." http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-01-11/news/sns-rt-us-education-kansasbre90b02q-20130111_1_tax-cuts-fund-schools-shawnee-county-district-court

Your comment leaves out that the legislature again cut funding to schools, with the support of Governor Brownback, and in the context of there being less revenue in the public coffers as a result of Gov. Brownback's desired revenue cuts.

Highly agreed that all Kansans need to pay accurate attention, not just attention based on their political leanings, to what is going on in their state.

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SouthWestKs 1 year, 3 months ago

I think this couple is confused. I beleive it was a Governor Parkinson that cut sending to schools. To bad some people do not pay attention to what is going on in their state. Stay warm & have a good day.

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msezdsit 1 year, 3 months ago

Those darn pesky kids. They are such a waste of money to our right wing radical "me me me, and only me, republican party. The dumber they are the easier they are to control. The me me me party can snuff out education and keep that money for themselves, then they will be the only ones who can afford education. Thats really looking out for the best interest of the kids. Wouldn't ever want to have one of the me me me's as a babysitter.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 1 year, 3 months ago

Great letter.

The courts didn't tell the governor or the legislature how they should raise the money to meet their constitutional obligation to adequately fund schools. They can do it by raising property taxes, if they so choose. But don't blame the courts for sending property taxes thru the roof rather than repealing the irresponsible cuts to the income tax that are driving the looming fiscal cliff.

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