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Archive for Thursday, January 10, 2013

All Kansas counties except one declared disaster areas because of drought

January 10, 2013

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As drought conditions continue into the new year, nearly all of Kansas has been declared a federal disaster area in 2013.

The disaster-area designation, announced Wednesday by the United States Department of Agriculture, makes low-interest federal emergency loans available to farmers in drought-affected areas. All Kansas counties, with the exception of Doniphan County, are included.

Almost 80 percent of the state is experiencing extreme drought conditions, including parts of Douglas, Franklin and Jefferson counties, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, a partnership of federal and academic agencies.

Northeastern Kansas has missed out on more than 12 inches of precipitation over the past year compared with the average, and experts say there is no good news in the immediate forecast.

"Not much has changed," said Brian Fuchs, a climatologist who tracks drought conditions at the National Drought Mitigation Center in Lincoln, Neb.

"I think we'll be dealing with this drought for a significant portion of 2013, unless the pattern changes," he said.

The light snow and rain Lawrence has seen in recent months haven't made a dent in that shortfall, Fuchs said. It takes 15 inches of snow in northeastern Kansas to equal one inch of liquid water, and the immediate Lawrence area was more than 11 inches below average for 2012.

The entire state of Kansas was declared a disaster area in July 2012, and Wednesday's announcement covers farmers for another year of drought. The emergency loans will be available to farmers to help cover losses throughout 2013. Today, the interest rate on those loans is 2.15 percent.

It's not usual for counties and states to immediately be designated federal disaster areas with the start of a new year, said farm loan specialist Lee Hartford at the USDA Kansas Farm Loan Office in Manhattan. Since July, areas of severe to exceptional drought have automatically become eligible for disaster relief.

Along with Kansas, parts of 13 other states were included in Wednesday's declaration, including Missouri and Oklahoma. These are the first federally designated disaster areas of the year.

Gov. Sam Brownback will meet Friday with state and federal officials charged with responding to the drought in Kansas.

Comments

yourworstnightmare 1 year, 3 months ago

I do have sympathy for the family farmer. However, they keep voting for these jokers and electing them to congress and the state legislature.

Responsibility for one's actions can be a bear.

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yourworstnightmare 1 year, 3 months ago

I am sure the the Kansas congressional delegation rationalized their Sandy "no" vote o grounds that it was spending we could not afford, similar to Brownback.

Brownback, Roberts, Moran, Huelskamp, Jenkins, and Pompeo should all refuse any drought relief, even in the form of low interest loans, on these same grounds.

Not gonna happen, though. When pigs fly.

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Les Blevins 1 year, 3 months ago

Daniel P. Moynihan Warned Nixon to Act on the Global Warming Threat, New Documents Show YORBA LINDA, Calif. — Global warming warnings were debated in President Richard Nixon's administration as early as 1969, according to newly released documents examined by The Orange County Register. The 100,000 pages of presidential records made available by the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum on Friday also portray former Nixon's inner circle as being out of touch with the American people and their sentiments against the Vietnam War. Most of the archived documents released Friday came from the files of Nixon's Democratic adviser Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Moynihan wrote in a September 1969 memo that it was "pretty clearly agreed" that carbon dioxide content would rise 25 percent by 2000, 'Amazing documents' "This could increase the average temperature near the earth's surface by 7 degrees Fahrenheit," he wrote. "This in turn could raise the level of the sea by 10 feet. Goodbye New York. Goodbye Washington, for that matter." "I would think this is a subject that the Administration ought to get involved with," Moynihan wrote to John Ehrlichman, who in 1975 was convicted of conspiracy, perjury and obstruction for his role in the Watergate break-in and cover-up. Moynihan was Nixon's counselor for urban affairs from January 1969, when Nixon began his presidency, to December 1970. "These are amazing documents," Library Director Tim Naftali told the Register. From 1961 to 1976, Moynihan served in the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon and Ford administrations. He served as the U.S. ambassador to India and the United Nations before serving four terms as U.S. senator from New York. He died in 2003.

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Gotland 1 year, 3 months ago

Farmers, the ones that are left, are the biggest welfare sponges in the country. All the while they poison the streams and soil with chemicals for their row crops.

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Paul R Getto 1 year, 3 months ago

My Grandfather, a dairy farmer, said the Government should never get involved in agriculture. Perhaps he was right.

2

deec 1 year, 3 months ago

Monoculture corn crops, which receive federal welfare, are mainly used for non-food purposes. "

According to the National Corn Growers Association, about eighty percent of all corn grown in the U.S. is consumed by domestic and overseas livestock, poultry, and fish production. The crop is fed as ground grain, silage, high-moisture, and high-oil corn. About 12% of the U.S. corn crop ends up in foods that are either consumed directly (e.g. corn chips) or indirectly (e.g. high fructose corn syrup). It also has a wide array of industrial uses including ethanol, a popular oxygenate in cleaner burning auto fuels."

Soybeans, another subsidized crop, is used mostly for making oil.

"Soybeans are used to create a variety of products, the most basic of which are soybean oil, meal, and hulls. According to the United Soybean Board, soybean oil, used in both food manufacturing and frying and sautéing, represents approximately 79 percent of all edible oil consumed in the United States. Soybean oil also makes its way into products ranging from anti-corrosion agents to Soy Diesel fuel to waterproof cement. Over 30 million tons of soybean meal are consumed as livestock feed in a year. Even the hulls are used as a component of cattle feed rations."

We don't have to eat meat or fried foods to survive.

http://www.epa.gov/oecaagct/ag101/printcrop.html

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mjjjam 1 year, 3 months ago

Did you eat today? Oh, the thoughts of those who have no idea!!!!!!!!!! The farmers I know do not live high on the hog..... no pun intended! I wonder... have any of you ever farmed before? Of course not! No appreciation for those who work so hard for YOU! Those at the top should have voted to support those of Hurricane Sandy! I'm certain the farmers in Douglas County would support that!

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formerfarmer 1 year, 3 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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thinkagain 1 year, 3 months ago

edson443 - We should start a trend and begin to declare Lawrence "an area of good fortune" and see if anything befalls us.

0

Mike Edson 1 year, 3 months ago

Being declared a disaster area is so "over." Everywhere has now been declared a disaster area.

1

deec 1 year, 3 months ago

"But while asking why taxpayers must subsidize waterfront development in areas under increasing threat from climate change, we should ask why weather-related questions stop at the shoreline. The federal government spends a fortune protecting farmers’ incomes in drought-prone regions that are going to get hotter and dryer. That encourages people to grow thirsty crops where they shouldn’t.

“The federal crop-insurance program is far worse in many ways than the flood insurance in the incentives it gives farmers to do things that are risky...Congress replaced a more modest farm-support program (paying out if drought, hail or flood substantially reduced the average yield) with an immodest program actually guaranteeing a farmer’s income. Taxpayers on average pick up two-thirds of the premiums."

http://seattletimes.com/html/opinion/2019857329_harropcolumnfarmwelfarexml.html

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Shelley Bock 1 year, 3 months ago

National media has now identified that Jenkins, who was a "Porker of the Month" a couple of years ago, voted against Hurricane Sandy aid because it was "pork". She knows how to create friends, doesn't she. How many back East are going to see Kansas as deserving of any federal assistance.

"Your pork stinks; my pork doesn't stink" should be her slogan.

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Gandalf 1 year, 3 months ago

Farm welfare should be "means tested".

6

thinkagain 1 year, 3 months ago

Ian - Can we get more specifics on which parts of Douglas County fall into the designated disaster area? Thanks.

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blindrabbit 1 year, 3 months ago

observant: Why would Brownie reject this manna from heaven, afterall, he and his family are major landowners in the Lynn County, Parker, Kansas area. This is ironic, since the town of Parker appears to be somewhat impoverished. I'm sure the Brownback family will gladly accept this gift. Curious, wonder how much the Koch-a-Kola land holding empire will benefit from this, I'm sure their coffers need to be replenished since Rovie absconded with their millions.

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shleppy 1 year, 3 months ago

will a real conservative please stand up?

2

blindrabbit 1 year, 3 months ago

Please provide how much money each of our 6 Teabag U.S. Senators/Representatives will receive out of this dole out. Already know that Brownback, Jenkins, Yoder and Huelskamp are all from agricultural backgrounds, agricultural property owners and are therefore likely benefactors. What role Roberts, Moran and Pompeo have in agriculture is less well known, but likely some connection. The point is, all of these scallywags (less Brownback, Moran and Roberts who did not vote) all voted "no" when it came to providing financial aid to Hurricane Sandy victims on the East Coast. Guess what is good for the gander is not for the geese.

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Cait McKnelly 1 year, 3 months ago

Not a week ago Kansas reps in DC voted against Hurricane Sandy relief. Not one voted for it. Not a single one.
The irony. It burns.

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Gandalf 1 year, 3 months ago

"The entire state of Kansas was declared a disaster area in July 2012" heck I thought that was 2010 when evilsam took over.

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KNUCKLEDRAGGER 1 year, 3 months ago

Isn't it ironic and very hypocritical that we, meaning the State of KS are willing to accept a Federal handout, when we refuse the Medicaid funding that will benefit thousands of KS residents. KS can take care of itself . We dont want the Feds telling us what to do with our farmland. Basically, the Corporate owned farmers are the ones screaming for relief . The Family Farms are becoming things of the past , sad but true . Now Big AGRA Farms runs the show and the politicians.

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observant 1 year, 3 months ago

I assume brownie in his infinite wisdom will reject this aid since the federal government will have some control over who and where it will go.

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appleaday 1 year, 3 months ago

And our legislators in Washington voted against hurricane Sandy relief.

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