Archive for Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Activist Sandra Fluke to speak at KU in March

January 2, 2013

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Women's rights activist Sandra Fluke will speak at Kansas University in March, delivering this year's Emily Taylor and Marilyn Stokstad Women's Leadership Lecture.

The lecture, organized by KU's Hall Center for the Humanities, is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. March 27 in Woodruff Auditorium at the Kansas Union. It will be free and open to the public, and a reception will follow.

Fluke, now an attorney, was a law student at Georgetown University when she testified in February 2012 at a Democratic U.S. House committee regarding health-insurance coverage of birth control. Commentator Rush Limbaugh called her a "slut" and a "prostitute" on his radio show, later apologizing for the insults.

She went on to be a supporter of President Barack Obama's re-election campaign, and she spoke at the Democratic National Convention in September. Time magazine named her a candidate for its "Person of the Year" title last month.

The lecture, titled "Making our Voices Heard," will concern the need for women to speak up about issues important to them, said Victor Bailey, the director of the Hall Center.

Bailey said Fluke's response to the attacks against her showed why she'd be a worthy speaker.

"Rather than responding in kind, she did, I think, take this media focus and made it into an opportunity to advocate for various social-justice concerns for women," Bailey said.

Before gaining national attention last year, Fluke advocated for the availability of contraception on the Georgetown campus and worked at a domestic violence center in New York City.

The Hall Center has presented the Taylor and Stokstad lecture, named for two leaders on women's rights issues at KU, for about 10 years.

Comments

Sunny Parker 2 years, 7 months ago

Can she now afford to pay for her own birth control? I mean...a box of raincoats is under $5.00!

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

Should women trust men to use "raincoats" correctly and consistently? Should they accept the failure rate of "raincoats" and the costs of unwanted pregnancies? Or maybe, sunny, you'd prefer to cover the costs of those unwanted pregnancies and 18 years of child-rearing yourself, out of your own pocket?

absolutelyridiculous 2 years, 7 months ago

Seriously? This is your rational for government funded abortion and birth control? Let's see, if she can't trust the guy she's sleeping with, she shouldn't have sex with him to begin with. Talk about a war on women! You rational is degrading to women voevoda. You and Sandy Fluke (ironic huh?) would make a great team.

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

I guess you don't know, absolutelyridiculous, what the failure rate is of "raincoats," even when used properly:

"The typical use of male condoms, which is the average way most people use them, has a failure rate of 14-15%. This means that 14-15 people out of every 100 will become pregnant during the first year of use."

http://www.americanpregnancy.org/preventingpregnancy/malecondom.html

Birth control pills have a much higher rate of success in pregnancy protection, but you don't want them to be available except to women who can afford to pay for them--and the medical appointments necessary to determine the proper type for that particular woman. Or your answer is "don't have sex"? What about married women who don't want to get pregnant? Should they abstain, too?

And what would you do about unplanned pregnancies, absolutelyridiculous? You imagine that none would occur?

Your unwillingness to face the realities of reproduction, absolutelyridiculous, is degrading to women and to men. And, so to speak, absolutelyridiculous.

jayhawk513759 2 years, 7 months ago

You can't be so obtuse as to not realize that, even with the most trusted and diligent male, the failure rate of condoms is 14-15%. Not to mention 2 in 100 condoms break.

http://www.americanpregnancy.org/preventingpregnancy/malecondom.html

God forbid we enable women the ability to plan for success.

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

What is degrading to women is repeating the lie that there is government funded abortion and birth control.

optimist 2 years, 7 months ago

Ya gotta pay to play... If she can't afford to pay for her own birth control, afford to pay for the consequences of getting pregnant then shouldn't she refrain from the behavior? Secondly should she be having sex with a partner she can't trust enough to protect her from pregnancy or disease? This isn't about family planning but rather about the rest of us paying for a bunch of immature so-called adults to take part in casual sex with no respect for the tax payers, society or most importantly themselves. I can't imagine what this woman can possibly offer the young adults at the University of Kansas. For the record I generally refrain from judging the behavior of specific individuals but I figure after she demanded that I pay her way I deserve to give my two cents whether it’s worth that or not.

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

If you think that people will just abstain from sex if they can't afford to bear children, optimist, then you are truly exceptionally the optimist! It hasn't happened that way ever in human history. Not to mention that abstinence on the part of married couples is actually discouraged. Or do you believe, optimist, that nobody should get married until they are financially able to cope with any and all unintended pregnancies?

And Sandra Fluke never asked you to pay for anything, optimist. She asked for her employer, a private institution, to be required to include birth control among the health care services covered by insurance, because it is a normal part of health care.

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

You don't pay for her insurance. Just like you don't pay for the insurance of any other women.

She was/is fighting to make sure that employers must make birth control available and can not refuse to provide birth control.

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

Another willfully ignorant person perpetuating the lie that women do not pay for their own birth control under the insurance mandate.

Tax payers are not paying for others to have sex. The insurance mandate requires insurance companies to cover birth control just as they do for other prescription drugs.

ebyrdstarr 2 years, 7 months ago

Raincoats, as you cutely call them, won't do one bit of good for a woman who has PCOS, a condition that is best managed with hormonal birth control. It infuriates me to have standard women's health care treatments reduced to jokes by ill-informed people.

chootspa 2 years, 7 months ago

She was never attempting to testify about her own need for birth control, but rather for a fellow student's medical need for prescription medication to treat PCOS. But thanks for playing!

optimist 2 years, 7 months ago

This is nuts; typical liberal approach. Deflect from the facts and real issues in lieu of injecting some emotional argument regardless of how far fetched it is. Using birth control as a treatment for a bona-fide medical problem is a completely different circumstance not at all discussed in relation to the governments demand that employers provide birth control as a part of its health care coverage regardless of ones moral objections. Secondly PCOS affects approximately 5% of women and is more often treated with changes to lifestyle and with other remedies resulting in an even smaller fraction of the effected women taking birth control as a form of treatment. That being said are you really going to use PCOS as a deflection of the bigger issue of whether or not tax payers should pay for birth control as a rule excluding the legitimate treatment of PCOS?

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

If you object to birth control on moral grounds, optimist, don't use it. But if you try to put birth control out of the reach of other people because you happen to disapprove of it, then you are just imposing your narrow sense of "morality" on other people.

There are people in the US who disapprove of blood transfusions on moral grounds. do you think that they should be allowed to allow insurance plans not to offer coverage for this treatment to people who don't share their morality?

Most Americans have no moral qualms about birth control. Just as the majority ought not to yield to a small minority in regard to blood transfusions, so the majority ought not to yield to a small minority in regard to birth control.

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

So you do understand that it is employers who provide the health insurance coverage in question, but you still think that somehow you are paying for that insurance?!?!?

Obviously you're a doctor to be able to dismiss the fact that only 5% of women are affected by this one thing that you heard about that birth control treats besides it's main purpose. But you're right, if it's only 5% of women affected, who cares?

chootspa 2 years, 7 months ago

Only about 5% of people get colorectal cancer in their lifetime, so I suppose it's only fair that insurance drops coverage of screening exams, right?

chootspa 2 years, 7 months ago

Sorry - I broke out in laughter after you accused me of deflecting from the facts.

Do go on. You were busy giving me the emotional argument that requiring a minimum level of insurance coverage was somehow an outrageous blow to freedom of religion? Do you also prepose that Christian Scientists have insurance that covers only prayer sessions?

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

It is sad that willfully ignorant people continue to perpetuate the lie that she (or any woman) is not paying for their birth control under the new health care law.

The mandate is that insurance companies cover birth control just like they cover any other prescriptions. Women still are responsible for any co-pays and deductibles.

absolutelyridiculous 2 years, 7 months ago

Oh good. I can't wait to hear the "poor" Georgetown student sob story about how buying her own contraception would be a burden to her finances. Please! I need to go throw up now.

Sorry to hear Marilyn Stokstad Leadership Lecture is sponsoring this. I thought very highly of Marilyn (past tense).

chootspa 2 years, 7 months ago

You'll be disappointed, since that wasn't her story.

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 7 months ago

Given that she (or another woman) would be PAYING for their health insurance, requesting that it be covered under her policy is far from asking for FREE (which it isn't) TAX PAYER FUNDED (which it isn't) birth control. If insurance covers Viagra (which is medically unnecessary and only exists for the machismo of men), then by God it can cover contraception.
And by the way, zombie (don't think I don't know you're a returning poster), by law, no tax funds have gone to abortion in over thirty years since the passage of the Hyde Amendment. But then facts never were your strong suit, were they?

Sunny Parker 2 years, 7 months ago

She's been thru law school....the poor woman should know what causes pregnancy! Why should I be forced to pay for her birth control!

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

Because you don't want to pay for the costs of rearing a child the parents cannot afford. And because you don't want to pay for the costs of an abortion. That's why, sunny, it's good for you, as one of millions of taxpayers, to contribute a few cents towards the cost of birth control. Except, in fact, sunny, you aren't paying anything. It's the insurance companies who are paying, and the employers who contribute to the costs of group insurance plans. In the case of Sandra Fluke, it was a private employer.

clubber1 2 years, 7 months ago

Oh geez, If a woman can't support the children she brings into the world, then she should STOP HAVING SEX! Women used to be ashamed of getting pregnant without a husband but now that we have become a nation that rewards "single mothers" by paying to raise their kids, it is completely acceptable. Children are not free meal tickets and should not be treated as such. It is time to go back to the days when women had respect for themselves and for men rather than to continue to teach young girls that men are bad and unnecessary. The lack of respect women have for men is a terrible trend that will continue to drag our society down.

Women, your future sons, your fathers and brothers don't deserve to be treated as poorly as most of you treat the men in your lives.

deec 2 years, 7 months ago

If the sperm donors supported their offspring, most single mothers wouldn't need welfare. Only about 40% of custodial parents receive the full child support to which they are entitled.

If males don't wish to be saddled with child support payments, they can refrain from loosening their drawers.

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

When was that time, clubber1, when women didn't have sex and didn't get pregnant when they didn't have husbands? Not in the 20th century. Not in the 19th century. Not in the 18th century. Not in the 17th century. Not in the 16th century. Not in the Middle Ages. Not in ancient times. No--as long as there have been women, women have given birth to children whom they cannot support and the fathers of the children refuse to support.

And when was it, clubber1, that men had respect for women? Certainly you don't, now, if all you can do is shout at them "STOP HAVING SEX!" as though they are doing so without any men participating. What was the old-time answer for women who got pregnant outside of marriage? Sometimes, it involved forcing them to marry the father of the child, or if he was too "important" to take as a wife a woman who had pre-marital sex, whatever other man could be convinced to marry her. Or more often, those women had no other recourse than to become prostitutes. And what became of the babies? Most often, clubber1, they died: killed by embarrassed families or angry fathers, abandoned on the street by desperate, hopeless mothers, or a lingering death from poverty and starvation and overwork from the time they could perform any at all.

No, clubber1; you aren't advocating respect for women, but rather disrespect for women. Your last sentence makes that clear--for you, it's all about how "poorly most of [women] treat the men in [their] lives." And that is your sole measure of women's virtue--whether they treat men the way you think they ought to. Maybe, clubber1, you should start by taking a hard look at how men treat women, beginning with yourself.

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

How much do you think it costs you for a health insurance provider to give a woman birth control?

Please also tell me what treatments, procedures and medications your are getting from your health insurance so that I can be angry about how unworthy your health care is to me.

chootspa 2 years, 7 months ago

I bet you know what causes high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart attacks, too.

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 7 months ago

Because you aren't paying for her birth control. She is when she pays for her health insurance.

hedshrinker 2 years, 7 months ago

you are NOT being required to pay for ANY of her prescriptions or medical procedures!!! how many times do people have to say it's about employers not being able to veto certain benefits being offered (with the usual employee copays, etc) on the health insurance plans the company offers to their employees....it is amazing to me how willfully ignorant some people are in the face of facts.

Kirk Larson 2 years, 7 months ago

Not very long ago the number one cause of death for women was childbirth. Contraception is very much a health issue.

absolutelyridiculous 2 years, 7 months ago

So now pregnancy is a disease? How does your logic back that position up?

Liberty275 2 years, 7 months ago

More like a parasitic condition than a disease.

ebyrdstarr 2 years, 7 months ago

No, actually parasitism is one type of symbiosis. Of the 3 general types of symbiosis, pregnancy in most cases would fall into the parasitic category.

ebyrdstarr 2 years, 7 months ago

Pregnancy can have very serious implications for a woman's health and it would be lovely if people would stop pretending otherwise. Perhaps you've heard the term hyperemesis gravidarum in the past few weeks. It's a potentially life-threatening condition that can cause dehydration to the point of organ failure. For a woman with diabetes, pregnancy can put more stress on the body than it can handle. (Didn't you ever see Steel Magnolias?) Women with MS should avoid pregnancy.

Even perfectly healthy women can develop complications like pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes. In the best-case scenario, Pregnancy will permanently alter a woman's body, affecting body chemistry, bladder function, and the really charming prospect of possible organ prolapse (look that one up; it's awesome!)

So, yeah, women should be allowed to treat avoiding pregnancy as a health issue. Because it is.

absolutelyridiculous 2 years, 7 months ago

This is not about pregnancy & health. Sandra Fluke is about government funded birth control. Sure, there are health risks with pregnancy...there's a health risk with crossing the street too...so I declare that crossing the street is a health-risk too and it should be avoided at all cost. I know! Let's have the government pay for all Americans to drive rubber cars!

appleaday 2 years, 7 months ago

She want contraception to be covered on her insurance plan. We all pay into our own insurance plans along with our employers. The issue is whether or not the employer gets to decide what is and what is not covered. I personally think that people who are overweight or who smoke, for example, should have to pay more for the costs of their health care instead of making my premiums go up. As many other posters have noted, pregnancy is a health issue. Women who have frequent pregnancies can develop serious health problems. Childbirth used to be the leading cause of mortality in women. Being able to space pregnancies has improved this tremendously. I would also think that employers would appreciate fewer pregnancies in their female employees because it would cut down on maternity leave. Also, many women use hormonal birth control pills for a variety of other health conditions, PCOS being a very important one. If you would like to know more aout the female hormonal and reproductive system, I'm sure you could Google it.

Bob Forer 2 years, 7 months ago

I would rather have my taxes provide low to no cost birth control for a low-income woman rather than pay to support that woman's unwanted child for 18 years with food stamps, free school lunches, health insurance, cash subsidies, etc, (not to mention the social costs disproportionately caused by underclass folks, e.g., crime). I also don't have a problem with subsidized abortions for disadvantaged women.

Funny, the right wing claims to be fiscally conservative but would apparently rather incur the astronomical social costs of unplanned, unwanted pregnancies and births by poor woman instead of spending a few dollars for sound and logical preventive measures by providing accessible and affordable birth control.

I am not surprised that the far right tend to be far less educated than liberals. They just don't get it.

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

While I understand what you are saying, please do not imply that your taxes are going for women's birth control under this insurance mandate. We have so many willfully ignorant people already on this topic as demonstrated by many of their posts.

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

By the way, your health insurance will cover you if you get hit walking across the street.

deec 2 years, 7 months ago

Or eat McFood every day of your life washed down with gallons of soda or booze.

chootspa 2 years, 7 months ago

Apparently we've always been at war with Eastasia, and birth control has always been an evil sin. Or something. I guess they'd rather people had more abortions? More welfare babies? Honestly, I don't get it.

absolutelyridiculous 2 years, 7 months ago

Class envy? Seriously? I make way more than Miss Fluke. If she can afford to go to Georgetown, she can afford a box of condoms or $9/month for the pill. But don't make me pay for it though. This is NOT about access or cost. It's about personal responsibility and self respect. The media has made here some moral super hero...and in reality, she's just an ignorant, misguided woman who has bought your lies.

dwendel 2 years, 7 months ago

Your ignorance of anything regarding women is seriously revealing, as is your avatar. Despite what your pastor tells you, God does love you. Cheers!

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 7 months ago

His ignorance of how insurance works is just as revealing.

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

It is sad that you persist in repeating long debunked lies about the birth control insurance mandate. Please stop doing that.

The insurance mandate requires insurance to cover birth control like any other prescription. Birth control would be treated no differently than if you had a prescription for blood pressure medicine.

Additionally, there are many different types of hormonal birth control and there is no one magic $9/mo. Pill that works for all women. The insurance mandate includes coverage also for IUDs, Norplant and Depo Provera all of which are longer term birth control and can have expensive upfront costs.

JayCat_67 2 years, 7 months ago

The only time my wife got pills that cheap was from the student health center when we were in college.

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

It is good that you wife only required the standard Pill rather than a different and more expensive one. The most common Pill is not always the most appropriate choice for all women. This is why the Pill is a prescription medication rather than an OTC one.

Smarmy_Schoolmarm 2 years, 7 months ago

I believe you should go listen to her speak...see what she has to say for yourself.

Sunny Parker 2 years, 7 months ago

Everyone needs to work harder so they can pay for womens birth control and every other hand out that the american workers are forced to pay!

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

Do you know how health insurance works? It's paid for by the insured.

Please tell us about your own health care treatments, procedures, doctor visits and medication so that we can tell you that we consider your health care worthless.

patkindle 2 years, 7 months ago

Sandra is part of the entitlement generation That expects the rest of us to carry her from Cradle to grave, and provide at no charge for her All the accessories needed in carrying on Extracurricular activities as she sees fit. after all it is her god given right

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

Wow, you have no idea what you're talking about.

Sandra Fluke was making sure that employers and health care providers had to provide birth control to women who have insurance. Insurance is not given away for free and paid for by you. Health insurance is paid for by the insured and also by employers, who pay for the health insurance with the labor generated revenue from the employees.

So you believe that this woman is terrible for making sure that women get the full health care that they pay for, is bad...

Orwell 2 years, 7 months ago

That argument, patkindle, works just as well now as when that multimillionaire vulture capitalist spouted off about "the 47%." The American people said they've had enough of your whining and hatred of those in tough circumstances.

jimmyjms 2 years, 7 months ago

The very best part of this article are the comments-to a person, totally ignorant both of what Fluke said, the context in which she said it, and the point in total.

Idiocy abounds.

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

Idiocy from people who don't understand how the female reproductive system or health insurance works...

Bob Forer 2 years, 7 months ago

Yes, it is about insurance coverage? But the debate should go further. What about millions of sexually active women who cannot afford health insurance? Do we want to pay to help raise their unwanted children?

Hell no. I'd rather give them free birth control rather than pay for the consequences of an unwanted pregnancy. A hell of a lot cheaper to all of us in the long run. .

JayCat_67 2 years, 7 months ago

Call it a guess on my part, but it would also seem that unwanted children would also have a higher tendency to become parents of more unwanted children too.

Bob Reinsch 2 years, 7 months ago

No one complains about Viagra and Cialis being covered by most health care plan.

hedshrinker 2 years, 7 months ago

actually some of us do complain,as in prisoners serving time for sex crimes getting Viagra on the State dime.

tomatogrower 2 years, 7 months ago

I don't think Viagra is used to treat any conditions, except erectile dysfunction. Why do insurance companies pay for it? Yet, birth control pills can help women with rough menstrual cycles, a condition much more painful than a guy who can't perform.

Jean Robart 2 years, 7 months ago

Viagra IS used to treat other conditions than ED. Pulmonary hypertension, which I have, is treated with Viagra and other ED drugs. In fact, it is used in babies to adult,and women and men. It was originally intended as a cardio drug, with a nice side effect.

tomatogrower 2 years, 7 months ago

So then insurance companies should pay for both!

Pepe 2 years, 7 months ago

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Orwell 2 years, 7 months ago

There we go. New proof that name calling is the fallback position when no cogent argument is available.

Bob Forer 2 years, 7 months ago

I wonder how many of the negative, snide and smarky comments are from men? My guess is most of them.

think_about_it 2 years, 7 months ago

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think_about_it 2 years, 7 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

Bob Forer 2 years, 7 months ago

I am sure the men opposed to the inclusion of birth control in health insurance policies have a different opinioni when it comes to covering their viagra, or any other medical procedure or Rx to allow them to be sexually active.

Utter hypocrisy.

oakfarm 2 years, 7 months ago

You have no idea what you are talking about what you blithely assert, "I am sure..." All you do is expose your bias and ignorance.

ferrislives 2 years, 7 months ago

Hopefully soon, birth control pills won't need a prescription and will be sold over the counter, greatly lowering the costs. This will also make a lot of these comments moot points.

But what say you about married woman who use birth control for family planning? Why would you be against something that leads to less abortions for all woman? Are we at a point where you get to pick and choose what medicines your insurance covers?

If so, what about Viagra, Cialis, or drugs to fight against obesity? What about diabetes drugs for people with Type-2 Diabetes? Do you think that they should not be covered because you think that they got what they deserved? How about the fact that not covering these drugs costs our country much more in the long-run? Don't you like to look on the fiscal side of things, or is woman-bashing more fun for you? As I've said before my friends, it's a slippery slope.

How about if you try to live up to your so-called conservative standards, and get out of people's personal lives? Oh, that's right, it's easier to be a hypocrite. Follow along sheep. Baaa baaa!

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 7 months ago

So I'll just describe Limbaugh for what I think HE is; a fat, cigar smoking, drug abusing, misogynist who can't get it up without his own Viagra script. (And by the way, every single one of those are and have been objectively reported, unlike his "opinion" of Sandra Fluke..)

absolutelyridiculous 2 years, 7 months ago

Here is the transcript for Sandra's testimony. $3,000/year for contraception? Seriously?

And don't expect your Catholic University to support you. Period. If you don't like, there are several other law schools around the country. Sorry dear.

http://www.whatthefolly.com/2012/02/23/transcript-sandra-fluke-testifies-on-why-women-should-be-allowed-access-to-contraception-and-reproductive-health-care/

ferrislives 2 years, 7 months ago

Her testimony that you referenced: “Without insurance coverage, contraception, as you know, can cost a woman over $3,000 during law school."

Law school is more than 1 year absolutelyridiculous; it's more like 3-4 years.

$3,000 / 36 months (3 years) = $83.33/per month out-of-pocket. How is that not correct?

Guess you didn't go to law school...try again.

Sunny Parker 2 years, 7 months ago

Personal responsibility! If she wants to have sex she should pay for her own birth control!

deec 2 years, 7 months ago

And women who are raped should ask their attackers to use protection. Of course then it would be argued they gave consent.

End sarcasm

Bob Forer 2 years, 7 months ago

Are we talking about "legitimate" rape?

deec 2 years, 7 months ago

"...National Survey of Family Growth, found that 14 percent of pill users said they were taking the medication for a purpose other than contraception.

The pill users include an estimated 762,000 women who've never had sex. Ninety-five percent of them cited reasons other than birth control for their use of the pill."

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2011/11/15/142358413/the-pill-not-just-for-pregnancy-prevention

Adolescent girls and young women are frequently prescribed birth control pills for irregular or absent menstrual periods, menstrual cramps, acne, PMS, endometriosis, and for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Girls who are diagnosed with PCOS are often prescribed oral contraceptives to lower their hormone levels and regulate their menstrual periods.

Read more: http://www.youngwomenshealth.org/med-uses-ocp.html#ixzz2GrYlNNsd

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

And additionally, there are different types of Pills and other hormonal birth control. What is an appropriate prescription for one woman may not be for another (this is one of the reasons why it is still is a prescription rather than OTC).

People want to focus a lot on the Pill because that is what makes the news but there are other methods of hormonal birth control. Depo Provera is also used to treat PCOS. IUD and Norplant may be more appropriate for women who need longer term birth control. All these are now covered under the insurance mandate.

fiddleback 2 years, 7 months ago

How sad that before I even clicked, I knew there would be a geyser of misogynist bull**** from LJW's stable of cretins, fountains of pure idiocy totally oblivious to factual correction. These guys almost have to be trolls, or else one just has to hope their astoundingly pathetic Neanderthal genes haven't been passed on...

Either way, sunny, Gilligan, patkindle & co., you not only have yet to offer a single criticism with any merit, your hateful repetition of patent mistruths brings utter shame to everyone exposed, especially your fellow male citizens. I guess I should just be grateful that I can operate with the brain upstairs, too...

Sunny Parker 2 years, 7 months ago

She should STILL pay for her own birth control! Personal responsibility!

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 7 months ago

Whee! What else can we cut out of insurance based on "personal responsibility"?
Let's see: blood pressure meds, diabetes meds, lung cancer treatment, malignant melanoma treatment, antibiotics, cholesterol meds. Actually, just about any treatment for any kind of cancer. If you got it because of your genetics than it was your parents personal responsibility not to have you. If it was from environmental exposure then you should take responsibility for that exposure. You have a congenital defect? Then your parents shouldn't have had you and you need to take responsibility for that. You have heart disease? Then you shouldn't have spent all of those years eating pork and butter.You need to take "personal responsibility" for that.
We should just do away with health insurance entirely. There's hardly a medical condition out there that can't be related to "personal responsibility".

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

Having insurance that covers health conditions is a form of personal responsibility. In fact, it is that principle that lies behind the Affordable Care Act: either people have to take personal responsibility and get health insurance for themselves, or they have to pay into a fund that is used to defray the cost of treating uninsured people. So, sunny, it's time for you to endorse ObamaCare!

appleaday 2 years, 7 months ago

Nope. She is an intelligent young woman with an opinion that differs from yours.

fiddleback 2 years, 7 months ago

Allow her? It's public university -- even people as seemingly hateful as you or the Phelps family are allowed onto campus. I think the verb you mean is invite...

Yeah, pretty disgusting that a female finally had the temerity to publicly propose that contraception enjoy the same coverage as Viagra....

And funny how all the knuckle-dragging talking-point zombies with presumably pro-life, anti-welfare views can't bear to acknowledge the amount of abortions and childhood poverty this would prevent...

Take a look at Bobby Jindal and other GOP leaders-- your cognitive dissonance is being called out and your apish thinking is being left behind. Just one more way that you're going extinct -- I suggest staying in that RV as much as possible.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/opinion/republicans-must-support-public-financing-for-contraception.html

ksjayhawk74 2 years, 7 months ago

Your lack of knowledge on the subject is disgusting Lawrence should be ashamed to have you as a resident and KU should be ashamed to have you spouting off your nonsense with "jayhawk" in your username.

fiddleback 2 years, 7 months ago

So you think that she doesn't know in advance what's done in her name or with her money? You must not really know her then....

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

Most Catholics in the US support the use of birth control, anticommunist. And, in fact, the Catholic Church has no opinion on the use of birth control by non-Catholics. That is because the prohibition on birth control is based on the definition of the sacrament of Catholic marriage. Non-Catholics are not subject to it.

So why have some Roman Catholic churchmen decried the requirement for insurance to cover birth control? It's not because they are intent upon denying it to non-Catholics. It's because they can't have separate and different insurance coverage for Catholic and non-Catholic employees, and they don't trust Roman Catholic women on the payroll to obey the Church and refrain from using the birth control benefits.

Of course, many scholars of the Roman Catholic Church are not themselves Catholic. Many scholars of the Roman Catholic Church disagree with the Church's stance on birth control. So I can't see that you have any basis, anticommunist, for assuming that Marilyn Stokstad would have any problem at all with Sandra Fluke presenting her views.

But if you decide to protest Sandra Fluke's presentation, quite likely you will find Fred Phelps at your side. Only you can decide if you want to align yourself with him.

fiddleback 2 years, 7 months ago

Sounds like a facile projection of your own pet values onto the woman simply because she's an expert on medieval art. Let me guess -- you're one of thousands who took one of her art history primer courses? You should try actually reading about her career or that of Emily Taylor before spouting off about your poor little convenient self-delusion being "defiled"...

fiddleback 2 years, 7 months ago

I would ask you why you're still here after betting your posting habit that Romney would win, but this is a perfect illustration of why you won't ever go away. Your narcissism demands that you even comment on items in which you have no interest, if only to sneer that they're not newsworthy...so what's the weather like up there?

Armstrong 2 years, 7 months ago

Good, at least better then the gutter

Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 2 years, 7 months ago

I wish the JW would publish how much these speakers cost. It should be interesting to see just how much these speakers charge for their great concern for humanity. Better the money be spent on faculty salaries than some nobody who's trying to make a killing long after their 15 minutes in the spotlight was over. This goes for speakers of all persuasions, incidentally. As far as I'm concerned it completely destroys their credibility to find out they're charging thousands of dollars for a lecture that's probably not as well informed as one of our local faculty could give. How about a lecture series with an honorarium for local faculty members to describe their current research?

Mike Ford 2 years, 7 months ago

nice to know all the people rush limbaugh programmed with thought control are acting accordingly. rush....the more lies you perpetuate the more these drones of yours believe....nice to know cape girardeau, missouri is the center of their world......learning is free by virtue of reading too bad these people listen to a fired KC Royals employee with a pill problem instead.

voevoda 2 years, 7 months ago

Disrespectful and sexist, labmonkey. In an attempt to insult Sandra Fluke, you just revealed your own ugly attitude.

labmonkey 2 years, 7 months ago

And I am sure you have never referred to a man as a pig who basically has the same attitude toward women as extreme feminists do toward men. Learn to take a joke.

fiddleback 2 years, 7 months ago

Probably no woman since Monica Lewinsky has had this many hateful sexual jokes made at her expense. Congrats on your amazing joke, labmonkey; you just hopped aboard one of the worst bandwagons of 2012. You also managed to prove the existence of boors who will even acknowledge the common sense of what Fluke advocates yet still find room to hurl sexual insults...

Michael Shaw 2 years, 7 months ago

You should look at the entire Oxford English Dictionary entry for "fluke." It is much more likely her name is drawn from that of the fish--compare Fish, Bass, etc.

jonas_opines 2 years, 7 months ago

You've really picked the most apt user-name possible this time around, haven't you? Good job on that.

beatrice 2 years, 7 months ago

Hey snap, did you notice that Mitt Romney lost the election. It was, in part, because of Republican attacks against women like Sandra Fluke.

Keep making your Republican voice heard. It only helps the opposition.

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

That's not snap.

Snap may have been horribly cruel to jokes by beating them to death but he never posted misogynistic tripe.

jonas_opines 2 years, 7 months ago

If I had to guess, I'd guess it was someone that had been, shall we say, Born Again.

And again and again.

But there's certainly margin of error.

Katara 2 years, 7 months ago

I believe that it is someone whose spouse would probably not be happy about his misogynistic posts given her breadwinner status.

jonas_opines 2 years, 7 months ago

"Is abstinence really that difficult?"

History says yes. Statistics say yes.

When your alternative to a government proposal is, basically: "people should just change their nature", it's not a very viable alternative, no matter how good it makes you feel to propose it.

jonas_opines 2 years, 7 months ago

I was curious if anybody calling Fluke a "man-hater" can actually back that up with specific quotes showing a contempt for men? Note that I said "men" and not "Limbaugh". I haven't paid much more than cursory attention so I can't say that there Isn't evidence, but a quick search came up with very little to support that. It did, however, come up with significant support for the claims of systemic misogyny amongst right-wing internet sites.

Armstrong 2 years, 7 months ago

Obviously Sandy loves men or at least parts of them. She is more of a societal sponge then anything else.

fiddleback 2 years, 7 months ago

"Fluke and her kind can't be responsible for this?"

Well, no, because "Fluke and her kind" are addressing endemic problems, unwanted pregnancies and accessibility of effective contraception, that are as old as the human species. She's talking about coverage that would result in far fewer abortions and less burdens to the health care and welfare systems, and would help to ensure that women control their destinies and have children when they're truly ready. Weird how pro-family all that sounds... And please don't even bother with the tired talking point about the pill being $10 at Walgreens; there's a whole spectrum of medications and devices which on average cost plenty more.

So one "left-winger" British woman muses about feminism's role in the decay of the familial bonds, and you giddily promote it like it's a substantive editorial with verifiable assertions...seems pretty desperate. Take a hint from right-winger Bobby Jindal and try this on for size: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/opinion/republicans-must-support-public-financing-for-contraception.html

Sunny Parker 2 years, 7 months ago

Tell me again why I should be responsible to pay for Flukes birth control pills? This gimme gimme free hand out society is getting old!

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