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Archive for Monday, February 11, 2013

100 years ago: Bill would require doctor’s OK before marriage

February 11, 2013

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Feb. 11, 1913:

  • "Topeka. -- Marriage only on presentation of health certificates will be possible in Kansas if a bill to be introduced in the legislature this week by A. B. Scott of Hodgeman county becomes a law. The Hodgeman county doctor and member of the lower house has prepared a new marriage bill which conforms in a general way with the new marriage law in Iowa, and he proposes to shake up the state's matrimonial system. In his bill Scott will provide that before a marriage certificate may be issued to a couple that they must visit their family physician and secure a clean bill of health. Only on the presentation of such a certificate to the probate judge will a marriage license be issued. This health certificate will then be made a part of the probate court records. Unless the physician's certificate shows that both the prospective bride and bridegroom are free from dread diseases, a marriage license shall be refused. Tubercular subjects especially would be placed under the marriage ban by Scott's proposed law.... Representative Scott believes that this law would safeguard the state against the marriage of undesirables and would lessen the work of the Kansas divorce bill."
  • "The quiet of North Lawrence was somewhat disturbed last night by a bit of gun play said to have been caused by a dispute over a sum of money. The damage, however, was limited to a couple of broken window panes although five shots were fired in the melee. The shooting is said to have been done by one John Stevens. It is said that he fired at 'Spot' Fearing and 'Skinny' Wilson, who, it is said, returned the attack with rocks which missed their mark but struck the window. Stevens has been taken into custody but the other two are still at large. This morning in police court Stevens pleaded not guilty and will stand trial tomorrow morning."

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