Archive for Thursday, December 19, 2013

100 years ago: ‘Clairvoyant’ waives hearing, pays fines, leaves town in short order

December 19, 2013

Advertisement

From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Dec. 19, 1913:

  • "The affairs of Charles Bowman, alias Prof. F. Lynn, came to a sudden termination late yesterday afternoon and the clairvoyant took an equally hasty departure from the city. Perhaps something in the cards warned the Professor, or it may have been a message from the spirit world with which he was in direct communication that advised him, or it may simply have been an attorney who was somewhat gifted in the art of solving the future, that advised Prof. Lynn to make his stay in Lawrence as short as possible.... Bowman's attorney yesterday afternoon waived the preliminary hearing and asked that the case be taken before Judge Smart of the District Court immediately.... Judge Smart fixed the amount of the fine and a little later the Professor paid for his freedom.... Lynn was eager to pay up at once. When he was brought to Lawrence from Wichita by Sheriff Cummings he had a total of $218 in cash on his person. Out of this sum he paid over to the court a total of $199.40. With only $18.60 remaining the Professor and his attorney took their departure on the first train for Monticello, Illinois, the home of the clairvoyant and evidently a place where persons of this class are better thought of than in Lawrence, Kansas.... Because the city does not care for another visit from Lynn or any of his calling an ordinance prohibiting clairvoyants to practice in Lawrence has been prepared and will be presented at the January meeting of the city council. No doubt this ordinance will be enacted into a city law and affairs of the sort just closed be avoided in the future."
  • "Captain J. B. Shane was quite seriously ill yesterday as the result of taking an overdose of cough remedy. He is recovering from the effects of the medicine today and his condition is not thought to be at all serious."
  • "Now comes the great and imperial state of Illinois to borrow Dr. S. J. Crumbine, dean of the K. U. medical school. Illinois wants to borrow him for two months and is willing to pay 'all expenses connected therewith,' but Chancellor Strong is unwilling to let him go at this time on account of food and drug testing and water analysis work."

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.