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Archive for Thursday, August 29, 2013

Lawrence Public Library selected for “Super Wi-Fi” pilot

August 29, 2013

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The Lawrence Public Library has been selected as one of four Kansas libraries to participate in a futuristic wireless Internet pilot program with the national Gigabit Libraries Network.

For four months, participating libraries will test TV White Space technology or “Super Wi-Fi,” which delivers Internet bandwidth across the same frequency used on analog televisions.

Streaming Internet over TV White Space allows Wi-Fi access to be beamed further distances to remote locations. Director of the Lawrence Public Library Brad Allen said participating in the pilot project will give the library an opportunity to explore the possibilities.

“We’re always looking for ways to better serve our community,” Allen said. “We’re curious and excited to find out if this is the real deal.”

Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library, Kansas City, Kan., Public Library and Manhattan Public Library will also participate.

Comments

Pr0digy 7 months, 2 weeks ago

From the looks of it they will be using groundbreaking technology that may actually bring Internet access to low-income households in our community and beyond.

This has a large if not infinite potential for business, the poor, our schools, rural farmers and our local economy. This sounds like the work of some innovative thinkers ( I mean YOU! People of Kansas! )

Why don't you read for yourself instead of taking my word or others that feel threatened by this innovations words torwards it.

http://giglibraries.net/Default.aspx?pageId=1676881 http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2011/07/new-wireless-specs-for-white-space-up-to-22mbps-over-12000-square-miles/ http://www.technologyreview.com/news/414855/wi-fi-via-white-spaces/ http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/~rohan/White_Spaces.html http://www.ieee802.org/22/

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Alceste 7 months, 2 weeks ago

smileydog asks: "... then why no satellite library out west?"

Alceste thinks smileydog's sense of direction is confused. Should be "....out EAST....". The city of Topeka is responsible for that stuff as that is really east Topeka.

There is a lot of confusion in Lawrence.....

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smileydog 7 months, 2 weeks ago

“We’re always looking for ways to better serve our community,” then why no satellite library out west?

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Joshua Montgomery 7 months, 2 weeks ago

The Super-WiFi is low frequency, low bandwidth tech.

The advantage is that is cuts through walls, trees, etc. The disadvantage is that it is low bandwidth and you can't run access points too close together.

I don't know what they are going to use this technology for (transmitting to rural Douglas County), but it sounds like an interesting experiment. They certainly aren't going to be getting a Gigabit of throughput out of it.

As for our WiFi network. OldEnuf2BYurDad hit the nail on the head. We currently require most of our members to have a high power modem or an external panel to access the network. We are pushing plenty of power and have excellent antennas and WiFi cards. The $10 USB WiFi stick some folks are trying to access our network with simply doesn't transmit with enough power to keep a reliable connection.

The technology works well when you have an external antenna professionally installed ($50), but can be spotty or non-existent if you are using a laptop or tablet.

This is one of the reasons we are moving to fiber ( http://www.wickedfiber.com ) Better reliability and throughput, but very, very expensive to install.

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OldEnuf2BYurDad 7 months, 2 weeks ago

But wasn't one of the biggest failures with FreeNet/Wicked that while the transmission antennas had ample transmission power, the average home WIFI or laptop DIDN'T have the needed power to transmit BACK to the FreeNet antenna? If the library's antenna can't receive a little signal coming from my home, then I don't have a connection, correct?

Someone correct me if this is wrong, but isn't this why FreeNet customers had so many issues?

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