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Archive for Tuesday, October 30, 2012

100 years ago: High school officials still cracking down on forbidden fraternities

October 30, 2012

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Oct. 30, 1912:

  • "Excitement of no mild nature prevailed this morning in High School circles when the rumor broke forth that the fraternity problem was about to receive another airing at the hands of the school officials. However, thus far the occasions for excitement has been limited almost entirely to rumor. It is understood, however, that some definite action has been taken although this rumor could not be confirmed by the school officials, but some of the boys who are seemingly under suspicion admitted having been called to the office of Superintendent Smith this morning and quizzed regarding the alleged existence of Greek Letter societies in the High School.... The frat question has been discussed and considered by the school authorities for some time.... At the opening of school all applicants were required to sign a pledge that they were not and did not intend to become members of any high school fraternity."
  • "The State of Kansas formally took possession of the largest fish hatchery in the world at ten o'clock this morning when a stream of water released by Chancellor Frank Strong leaped into a breeding pond at Pratt. Devised by Lewis Lindsay Dyche, professor in the University of Kansas and State Fish and game Warden, and constructed by the University regents, the new culture plant will place fish as a common article of diet upon every table in an inland state."
  • "W. J. Pettingill, who formerly lived northeast of Lawrence, and who went to California a year ago, has returned and says there is no place like Kansas. About the only openings there are near Bishop, California, are dairying and chicken raising and even those are not overly profitable. Mrs. Pettingill, who was in good health when she went away, was taken with rheumatism in the California climate and is still suffering with it."

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