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Archive for Thursday, November 15, 2012

100 years ago: KU speaker recommends international outlook for young people

November 15, 2012

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Nov. 15, 1912:

  • “‘I would rather live five years in China than fifty years here,’ was the rather astounding statement of Arthur Rugh who spoke in chapel at Fraser Hall this morning. Mr. Rugh is International Secretary of the Y.M.C.A. and has been in China for the past twelve years. ‘We must think in world’s terms nowadays, since in business the Pacific and Atlantic oceans do not exist. Everything is international in scope. One of the largest problems of a modern education is to get a world’s consciousness.’ Mr. Rugh said that he considered China, and the Orient in general, the greatest field for medicine, engineering, law and religion, of any in the world. He recommended that all young men go there, and not to go with the general idea that is prevalent that he is leaving all forms of civilization behind him.”
  • “When Prof. E. F. Stimpson, of the University, deputy state sealer, inspected the city scales a short time ago he found they were weighing a little too heavy and while the producer would have no kick it might be a little to the disadvantage of the buyer. Notice was given the city at once to make necessary corrections and a man came up from Kansas City to correct the errors in the scales. Prof. Stimpson thinks that the scales should be set in cement and roofed over to protect them from the elements, but the latter would be rather hard to do on account of the loads of loose hay which have to be weighed.”
  • “The Douglas County Democrats will celebrate the victories won by the party at the Polls on Tuesday, Nov. 5 with a banquet to be given some night next week. At a joint meeting of the representatives of the various Democratic Clubs in the city last night it was agreed that the party should celebrate and that the celebration should take the form of a banquet.”

Comments

Sarah St. John 2 years, 1 month ago

"We must think in world’s terms nowadays, since in business the Pacific and Atlantic oceans do not exist. Everything is international in scope."

Wow, and this was long before easy cross-oceanic communication. You could send a telegram across the sea as early as the 1850s, but I bet it was expensive. Transatlantic phone calls didn't start until after 1926.

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