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Archive for Saturday, March 10, 2012

Rick Santorum wins Kansas presidential caucuses

March 10, 2012, 2:25 p.m. Updated March 11, 2012, 12:59 a.m.

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— Rick Santorum overwhelmingly won the Kansas Republican presidential caucuses on Saturday, bolstering his claim that front-runner Mitt Romney hasn’t locked up the GOP nomination.

The state GOP projected that Santorum will pick up 33 of the state’s 40 delegates after receiving more than 50 percent of the vote. Romney, who didn’t campaign in Kansas, hovered just above the 20 percent threshold needed to capture delegates and was projected to pick up seven.

“We’ve had a very, very good day in our neighboring state of Kansas,” Santorum told several hundred people at a rally in Springfield, Mo. He called the win “comfortable” and said he was looking forward to claiming “the vast majority of delegates.”

Santorum enjoyed support from some small-government conservatives in Kansas and, more importantly, many abortion opponents who make up a core constituency of the state GOP, including leaders of Kansans for Life. He portrayed himself as the non-establishment candidate, telling locals that their caucuses were crucial ahead of other post-Super Tuesday contests in the South.

“If there’s anybody who’s really conservative, it’s him. He’s a strong evangelical believer, and that’s very important for me,” said Alan Locke, a 65-year-old retiree and Southern Baptist from Topeka who voted for Santorum in his hometown. “I like it that he’s pro-life, that he is pro-life from before birth until the grave.”

Final, unofficial reports from the 96 caucus sites showed Santorum winning 51 percent of the vote compared to Romney’s 21 percent. Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich had 14 percent, while Texas Rep. Ron Paul captured almost 13 percent. But the party has yet to count almost 1,000 provisional ballots cast by voters who showed up at the wrong site or did not have photo identification.

Paul had three campaign events Friday, while Gingrich canceled his Kansas events to focus on Southern states after he won his native Georgia on Tuesday.

The GOP nominee is all but certain to win Kansas in the November general election because of the state’s strong GOP leanings. A Democrat hasn’t carried the state since Lyndon Johnson in 1964, and Republicans hold all statewide and congressional offices along with large legislative majorities.

Josh Kelton, a 36-year-old Wichita engineer, said he had not made up his mind to vote for Santorum until he went to hear him at a rally Friday and Santorum’s wife at the caucus Saturday in Wichita. Kelton’s wife and five children were with him at the caucus.

“We can relate to them,” Kelton said. “They have the same values we do.”

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, received a late boost in Kansas when political icon Bob Dole, the 88-year-old former U.S. Senate majority leader and 1996 Republican presidential nominee, urged his fellow Kansans to back the front-runner.

Dole described Romney as a “main street conservative.”

Romney also was endorsed by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a conservative former law professor known for helping draft tough illegal immigration laws in Arizona and Alabama. Kobach has said Romney is more conservative than he’s been portrayed.

Kobach said Romney’s decision not to campaign in Kansas hurt him, but Kobach said it’s significant that Romney still picked up delegates.

“The road to the Republican nomination has already had twists and turns and no doubt there will be more to come,” Romney said in a statement. “But I have no doubt that with the progress I’ve made today that I will be the Republican Party’s presidential nominee.

Connie Kimble, a 67-year-old U.S. Veterans Administration worker from Topeka, wore a Romney sticker as she voted for him. She acknowledged feeling torn between him and Santorum.

“But it’s that thing — OK, who do I think probably stands the best chance against Obama?” she said. “And I think it probably is Romney.”

However, Kansas Republicans have shown an independent streak in the past.

In February 2008, Arizona Sen. John McCain already was the GOP’s presumed presidential nominee, but former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee trounced McCain in the state’s caucuses.

Comments

mikekt 2 years, 1 month ago

Maybe if Sanctorum gets the Publican nomination he will choose Brownwack as his V.P. nominee? That would just be great for Kansas! It might save Kansans the full insanity of Brownwacks' attentions for a while, while he runs for V.P.! However, It would be a great disaster, hand bought, for this nation! The Publicans could & should do better than Brownwack; not that Sanctorum makes sense? Particularly if Brownwack should ever get elected V.P. & be just one tragic event away from the Presidency! Oh my! God save us from that!

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kansanjayhawk 2 years, 1 month ago

I am proud of the people of Kansas for standing up to the establishment--even the Republican establishment that wants Romney in the worst way--and voting for a working class candidate who supports bringing manufacturing jobs and economic growth back to our nation. Rick Santorum is not a perfect candidate but he makes a connection with the average folks and that is why he is doing well in Kansas. Mr. Obama and Mr. Romney should take note that the mainstream of middle America wants to retain our moral and religious rights and values and we want to make America strong again by bringing back many of those manufacturing jobs that were lost over the last 30 years. Go rick Santorum!

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lwctown 2 years, 1 month ago

People in Kansas will always vote republican. It doesnt matter how good for Kansas a certain non republican candidate could be they wil still vote republican. I have lived in Kansas all my life and as I have grown older and learned to think for myself I have become increasingly shocked at how "republican at all cost" so many Kansasans continue to be. I am certainly not a subscriber to the "whats wrong with kansas" as there is alot right to Kansas when compared to other states. The people in Kansas should wake up and realize that the 100% rightwing conservative approach is not always the solution.

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yourworstnightmare 2 years, 1 month ago

I hope they all vote for Santorum in November as well.

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Fred Whitehead Jr. 2 years, 1 month ago

Of course Romney did not come to Kansas. All he has to do is look at the theocratic idiologues that have been elected as governer, senators and secretary of state. Who whould want to waste time on a ready- made wasteland of clueless wonks who bother to vote.

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Richard Heckler 2 years, 1 month ago

We must remember the country was under the government watch of Bush/Cheney who twice sent the economy down the tubes in 8 years.

  1. Their inability to keep the FBI on the trail 24/7 of the 9/11/01 culprits which sent the economy down the tubes. Yes citizens should have demanded loudly their resignations.

  2. The Bush/Cheney/Paulson home loan fraud perpetrated against America again sent the economy down the tubes. Where are the resignations?

In real life this type of management would have resulted in termination without question.

Since government malfeasance was the source of millions of jobs losses it seems it would be the role of government to put the unemployed back to work.......without question.

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Richard Heckler 2 years, 1 month ago

Santorum will bring back warmed over Bush family of politicians wreckanomics not fiscally responsible management of OUR tax dollars.

Santorum will bring MORE BIG GOVERNMENT telling women what to do and giving MORE TAX DOLLARS to the wealthy corporate USA tax dollar moochers which is facism pure and simple.

Santorum is a wealthy white collar radical right wing extremists who by the way has spent his last few years as a lobbyists. Got defeated and run out of congress only to become a high dollar lobbyists.

What the hell are voters thinking? Since when does a defeated congressman and now a lobbyists make for a good choice?

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Bob Forer 2 years, 1 month ago

Why do all my republican friends occupy the lower hahf of the Bell Curve and sell Amway?

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mr_right_wing 2 years, 1 month ago

Fort Lawrence, still the most easterly holdout of the San Franciso hippies.

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Crazy_Larry 2 years, 1 month ago

So out of 750,000 or so registered republicans, only 30,000 or so showed up to vote in the caucus. Once again, a minority of crack-pots speak for the majority. Shame on you if you're a registered republican and you didn't bother to vote. Not that it matters which republicrat or democan gets "elected". Obama will be reelected.

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verity 2 years, 1 month ago

I would be interested in knowing exactly what people are looking for in a president. I wonder if we really think about that when we decide who to vote for or make our decisions for reasons that are less than rational.

I remember that a lot of people liked George W. Bush's in your face attitude and/or thought he would be fun to have a beer with. He certainly didn't come across as being very intelligent---at least I didn't think so. I will never understand the dislike for education or intelligence that seems to be popular recently.

Am I right that a lot of people want someone they see as being like themselves? Quite frankly, I don't want someone like myself as president. I want someone who is a lot more competent, more learned, intelligent and wise. I want someone who is more pragmatic than ideologue, who can admit when something isn't working and change it, who is looking out for the best interests of the whole country, not some blind ideology.

I remember a few years ago PBS did a series on the presidents and it seemed hardly an, until recently, wanted to be president. Maybe that is our problem now. It takes so much ambition and money that any person who wants to be president isn't fit for the job.

Another thing is that being the most powerful person in the world and having all the responsibility that goes along with it is really too much to expect from any human being. Anybody who thinks they should have that job has got to be arrogant.

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Armored_One 2 years, 1 month ago

I didn't know that provincial theocracies actually had elections... the things you learn online, I swear.

But all sarcasm aside, can anyone give me a GOOD reason that religion should be involved in politics?

I can show an easy half dozen reasons politics shouldn't be involved.

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its_just_math 2 years, 1 month ago

I'm being realistic and not in denial. As incredulous as it may seem, I think Obama will be re elected. Maybe this is history doing what it does. Maybe we need to get our heads wrapped around this change he's promoting. I don't really give a sh*t anymore anyway.

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Fred Whitehead Jr. 2 years, 1 month ago

I think I am going to throw up. This defrocked Pennsylvania psuedo-senator is the worst possible choice for president, Republican or any other party. He is as phony as a 3 dllar bill. But the addled, btrainwashed limbots of Kansas have still not seen what they are getting with the Republican Terrorist Party. The actions of a theocrat governer, secretary of state and others who are devoted followers of the Religious Reich should be a wake up call to all. But I imagine that the klan, and the militia dolts have their impact and we will be saddled with this right wingnut bigot. I do seriously doubt that he will beat out Romney, but thestinking pall of stupidity that this thrown on Kansas is almost unbearable.

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Armstrong 2 years, 1 month ago

If I were an Obama supporter ( one of the few ) I would be very nervous. Numerous proven failed policies and severe lack of leadership is the nail in his coffin

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mr_right_wing 2 years, 1 month ago

I appreciate the entertainment value of the Kansas minority (Lawrence) reacting to the decision of the Kansas majority. If it weren't for this tiny blue speck in a red state things just wouldn't be as interesting!

Thanks folks.

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JayhawkFan1985 2 years, 1 month ago

does anyone remember when KS used to have primaries? It strikes me that when only a few thousand people participate in caucuses that undermines the selection process. That seems to be the true intent of the GOP, make it harder for moderate folks to participate and then the "right kind" of people will win. We need to oust the Taliban controlled GOP from this state and from the US house!

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JayhawkFan1985 2 years, 1 month ago

Since republicans in the KS legislature can't read bills, does the republican party use pictures of the four candidates in the caucuses? Just asking...

How do the cypher them numbers afterwards? I'll bet Jethro carried the not a few times...

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clipper71 2 years, 1 month ago

The Tea Party people are clueless, for if they knew what they were doing they would vote for Ron Paul, who is the reason the movement became a movement in the first place. Social issues were not part of the platform until FOX News co-opted the group.

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Enlightenment 2 years, 1 month ago

Hey Republicans, the caucus was to elect a government official to represent the interest of the majority and possibly lead the US in a noble and fair way. You are not voting to see who will be bishop or pope, enough with this religious BS.

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Kate Rogge 2 years, 1 month ago

Evangelicals came out in droves for the Republican caucuses to choose Santorum. The NY Times estimates evangelicals are a third of the Kansas electorate. If so, two-thirds of us will most likely vote for someone else, Romney or Obama, come November. Today was a sideshow and there's no sense getting upset over a carney act like Rick Santorum. IMO

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Ron Holzwarth 2 years, 1 month ago

I hope President Obama is working on his speech thanking the American people for reelecting him to be the President of the United States for another term.

He's going to need it, so he may as well start working on it now.

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jayhawklawrence 2 years, 1 month ago

One of the major vulnerabilities of the Christian faith arises from the belief that Christ will return and it is through this belief that many imposters have appeared throughout history. Christians are in the habit of looking at candidates and trying to decide which one God is using and I think this habit contributes to the problem of overlooking a candidates faults and projecting your own ideals and imagined hopes and dreams onto the person you believe is "God's representative".

Rather than make the effort to actually research a candidates position in depth, it is easier to believe that a candidate has been sent by God solve all of your problems.

Unfortunately, I think we have a lot of people living with this state of mind.

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Chris Golledge 2 years, 1 month ago

From what I've seen, Santorum wants the government to play an active role in religious-based decisions like marriage, thinks he knows more about physics than the last 150 years worth of scientists, thinks the Christian story of creation is valid material for science classrooms, and that the Iraq war was a good idea.

For my two cents, that is delusional.

His other positions are a mixed bag of some that make sense and some that don't.

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clipper71 2 years, 1 month ago

For the record, Iran is not a threat to the United State's security. Santorum's pro bomb Iran rhetoric is overheated and dangerous. Shame on anyone who allowed Limbaugh, Hannity, and other right-wing propagandists to convince you otherwise. Ron Paul was the only answer. Now, we'll be a full blown police state over the next 10 years, especially if Santorum wins the nomination and beats Obama. As for myself, I'll be voting for the peace candidate: Gary Johnson, the Libertarian, if Ron Paul doesn't run third party.

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ConcernedAmerican 2 years, 1 month ago

It's really too bad that all of this boils down to religion and politics. What do you think is going to happen to the economy with either Obama or a nutcase like Santorum (or Romney, or Newt)? It will continue to get worse and this country is gong to take a fall. We won't be worrying about abortions, homosexuality or contraceptives. We will all be learning how to survive on very little while the President is assassinating anyone who gets out of line.

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sunny 2 years, 1 month ago

As long as Obomy gets destroyed!

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ljwhirled 2 years, 1 month ago

Oh come now. We are also the state where "pro-life" christian activists murdered a doctor in a church on Sunday.

What's not christian about that?

Frothy!

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clovis_sangrail 2 years, 1 month ago

The gaping primates of Kansas have spoken, and the politics of homo neanderthalensis has triumphed, though were I the candidate, I would not crow too loudly about carrying the state in which the goat-gland doctor very nearly became governor.

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Shaun Battles 2 years, 1 month ago

Is it just me, or would all 4 of these clowns make for a great reality TV show?

Santorum, Romney, Gingrich, Paul.

Let's put them all in one house for a few months, fire up some TV cameras, and battle it out.

Genius I'm telling you. Genius.

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its_just_math 2 years, 1 month ago

For the record, I'm not now nor have I ever been a Santorum fan. He not only needs to keep his trap shut about his religion, he is not qualified IMHO. Romeny is. Gingrich disgusts me more each day, although it is a fact he would embarass Obama in a debate. I am tired of seeing that plastic bleach blonde wife of his standing next to him while he makes his tired bellicose statements. Maybe you leftists are right about the GOP. Still, Obama sucks terribly---that is where we differ.

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autie 2 years, 1 month ago

Just remember, as we are turning are clocks forward one hour, the Santorum evangilical extremist will be turning the clock back two hundred years.

I cannot believe anybody in their right mind would suport this lunatic. His thoughts, words and actions bring a tear to Jesus' eye everytime he does something. He hates women, gays, non-christians, brown people and everything else that is not part of his pristine lily white leave it to friggin beaver world. Santorum types scare me as they would put people like me on trains and ship me off to camp...and that ain"t summer camp junior.

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tir 2 years, 1 month ago

Why should it surprise anyone that the same right-wing lot that elected Brownwhack would show up in droves and choose Sanctorum in the caucuses? That doesn't mean he will get the nomination, though. Plus, he's so far right on so many social issues that if he is chosen as the Republican nominee, he could end up being a liability to his party in the elections.

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Jan Rolls 2 years, 1 month ago

If he were a christian he would treat everyone equally. If he were a christian he wouldn't tell women what they can or cannot do. He is a sorry excuse a sexist and racist. His wife must be saying to herself that's ok rick I don't need to have a mind of my own.

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sickofdummies 2 years, 1 month ago

I didn't vote for him. But, my thoughts are that no one person can make that kind of change. Thankfully, our forefathers ensured that when they created our government of checks and balances. Nothing can pass unless a majority of senate, congress AND the president agree. Incidentally, this is our saving grace and our biggest problem. Not only do we not need an extreme right wing president, we also should not have an extreme liberal one either. We need someone who is not interested in party politics, but in uniting our country to solve the problems at hand. Sadly, a candidate of that disciption would never be elected. People like their partisan politics too much.

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Bob Forer 2 years, 1 month ago

So much for the family values candidate. His wife lived in sin with an abortionist doctor 40 years her senior and only left because she wanted kids and he had grown kids. You would think if Ricky were a true Christian, he could have found himself a real Christian girl.

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ThePilgrim 2 years, 1 month ago

"He portrayed himself as the non-establishment candidate "

Santorum never saw a Congressional tax raise, or big gov't program that he didn't like - until he ran for Pres.

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ksjayhawk74 2 years, 1 month ago

Just a reminder: Rick Santorum has said he would give states the right to outlaw BIRTH CONTROL!!!

Please, someone who voted for Santorum, chime in and tell us why you think it's OK to vote for someone who is in favor of banning birth control.

This is the same guy that doesn't want Big Government imposing on people's lives.

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question4u 2 years, 1 month ago

Why all the animosity? Kansas Republicans and Kansas Democrats want the same thing: Santorum as the Republican candidate in the general election.

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clipper71 2 years, 1 month ago

If Limbaugh and Hannity get off the airwaves, perhaps sanity will be restored to Kansas. It's OK to be conservative, but Kansans are voting for Neoconservatives like Santorum. Santorum is not a conservative.

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clipper71 2 years, 1 month ago

"What's the matter with Kansas?"

Answer: Too many right-wing, Limbaugh-listening crazy people.

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coryweber 2 years, 1 month ago

For all the libs that aren't comfortable here and are offended by our right to choose the way we want to live, try going elsewhere. I f we suck so bad here, why stay? Go where there are others of like mind, we won't stop you. In fact I know a bunch of people with trucks that would be happy to help you move. If you came from somewhere else and would like Kansas to be more like where you came from... you could always go back and take a couple friends with you. The unofficial state motto is: Welcome to Kansas! Now go the hell home!

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distant_voice 2 years, 1 month ago

Once a Republican, I find the Party, especially in Kansas, no longer represents my interests. They have abandoned the middle ground for the ultra right, and like all radicals, refuse to compromise. In the 70's, the Democratic Party nominated people on the radical left and they went down to landslide defeats until the Democrats realized that Americans will not elect a radical to the Presidency. Until the Republicans learn the same lesson, we can safely say that they will suffer the same fate. There is no surer way of re-electing Obama than standing Santorum up against him.

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patkindle 2 years, 1 month ago

Rick Santorum is the KING OF KANSAS , WOO WOO HOW ABOUT THAT, ?????????????????????

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clipper71 2 years, 1 month ago

No wonder Dorothy dreamed of flying over the rainbow.

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deec 2 years, 1 month ago

Will the last sane person out of Kansas please turn off the lights?

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clipper71 2 years, 1 month ago

The "family values" war candidate won. Way to go, brainwashed Kansans, way to go. Make your deity Fred Phelps proud.

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observant 2 years, 1 month ago

No surprise, you're in Kansas, home to nothing but right wing religious nutcases, Example: brownie and the gop/teabaggers who keep getting elected.

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Brock Masters 2 years, 1 month ago

Not surprising.

My main candidate is still in the race - ABO.

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