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Archive for Friday, July 27, 2012

Teachers, district reach tentative deal on pay

July 27, 2012

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Lawrence school district and its teachers union announced on Friday they have reached a tentative agreement on a contract that would contribute $1.6 million for new teacher salaries.

Kyle Hayden, assistant superintendent for business and operations, said he was glad a new contract could be in place before the start of the next school year.

“That’s a positive for everybody,” he said.

Hayden said the district found additional money for teacher raises while completing the required budget documents for publication. An adjusted special education state aid calculation resulted in $250,000 in unanticipated new revenue for the district, he said.

Teachers are paid based on a pay schedule that provides more money both for teachers with more education and for teachers with more years of service, up to a maximum amount.

The two sides had reached an impasse when the district’s negotiating team stuck to its offer to increase each level on the schedule by $1,000, and the union stayed behind its offer that would have increased each level by $1,500.

Under the new compromise, each salary level would increase by $1,200. David Reber, a Free State High School science teacher, served as lead negotiator for the teachers.

“We were pleased that the board was able to essentially bridge that gap from where we were before,” Reber said. “We didn’t feel like we could do 100 percent of the moving.”

He said getting to more than $1,000 per level was important because more than half of the union’s membership had already reached the maximum amount of money for years of service.

During the previous year, district officials had granted teachers a $1,000 one-time payment to augment their salaries, and because that went away this year, a $1,000 raise would be equivalent to keeping the same salary, Reber said.

The contract is still subject to approval by the school board and the union’s membership. Reber said the union was still formulating a plan for when and how to conduct the election.

The Lawrence school board is scheduled to vote on the contract at its Aug. 13 meeting.

— Higher education reporter Andy Hyland can be reached at 832-6388. Follow him at Twitter.com/LJW_KU.

Comments

Richard Heckler 1 year, 8 months ago

If taxpayers had their way....

Would you favor a sales tax increase to provide more money for Lawrence teacher salaries?

Yes was 80% of those who voted for a number of 4,204 votes. The total number of votes cast was extraordinarily high.

Teacher Salary Support http://www2.ljworld.com/polls/2003/mar/teacher_salaries/

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mdab1609 1 year, 8 months ago

It is unfortunate that the teachers in the teachers union are not demonstrating the same amounts of passion and energy in their teachings as they are in their union work and negotiations. If they were I am sure that the need for time killers such as free-time, coloring, and the copious use of outdated videos would decrease significantly.

1

Matthew Herbert 1 year, 8 months ago

The actual difference between pay this coming year and pay last year is $16.67 per month or .55 cents per day. Based upon an average high school teachers load, that comes out to just over 1/3 of a cent extra per student, per day. What a bunch of greedy teachers!

3

FalseHopeNoChange 1 year, 8 months ago

So how is New America 'doing' after 50 years of government training?

They have a "Choom Gang" Leader for a president.

U6 unemployment 15%

Foodstamps all time high.

Poverty all time high.

SS disability all time high.

People on welfare all time high.

Government debt all time high.

....and government employees that train the multitudes of children being popped out by breeders 'want' a raise?....for what?...more of the same?

lol

1

Mike Edson 1 year, 8 months ago

There is a good amount of misunderstanding going on here. When the teachers get a raise the classified and administrative staff also get the same percentage of a raise. They also get to have the same benefit package as the teachers.

As for teachers dressing professionally, they run the gamut. I have seen teachers at LPS in ties and I have seen them in shorts and flip flops. I guess it depends on what you teach. My belief is that flip flops are never appropriate footwear for work. You have to dress the part of authority if you are to teach and influence the students.

2

Cant_have_it_both_ways 1 year, 8 months ago

How about some tax relief. Everytime the public sector or tax funded places get a raise, the working stiffs take a pay cut to pay for it.

Things need to change.

0

rlsd 1 year, 8 months ago

But the fact remains none of the rest of us got raises, MANY got nothing or were let go, so this works out how?

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Lori Nation 1 year, 8 months ago

Now you teachers need to actually work for the students. They also need to get rid of that excuse for leaving work early dismissal Wednesdays. Oh and start dressing professional when we were in school I remember suits, dress clothes. Not beach wear and flip flops.

1

oneeye_wilbur 1 year, 8 months ago

And the local taxpayers incomes decrease. Now what?

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