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Archive for Monday, July 9, 2012

100 years ago: Some things never change: July brings hot weather, fresh farm produce

July 9, 2012

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for July 9, 1912:

  • "Today was another scorcher, the hottest day in the year with a strong hot wind added to make it a day of general uncomfort and some real suffering. The thermometer at 2 o'clock had advanced to 91 degrees according to the University reading while downtown indicators hovered about the 100 mark. It is feared that the hot wind, which was blowing all day, will have ill effects on the crops, especially corn. As yet, however, it is believed that little damage has been done but should the winds continue the crops may be materially affected."
  • "Fresh vegetables and fruits are now on the market for Sunday dinner or any other meal. One of the latest additions on the market is corn. The roasting ears are selling at fifteen cents a dozen. Home grown tomatoes bring fifteen cents a pound or twenty-five cents for two pounds. Fine large cucumbers are selling for five cents apiece. This is a good season for pies. Blackberries, cherries and huckleberries of excellent quality are found in the markets. The blackberries are fifteen cents a box, huckleberries twenty cents, and cherries fifteen cents. Apples are becoming more plentiful. The different grades are selling at thirty, forty and sixty cents a peck. Large watermelons are selling at fifty cents apiece."
  • "Dr. James Naismith in his recommendation to the Board of Regents Friday suggested equipment for Potter Lake which will make the lake as safe for swimming as it is possible to have any body of water. He asks for a flat bottom boat of the dory type that may be propelled in either direction to save time in turning. This boat is to be equipped with a pair of oars, a strong paddle, an anchor, and a pipe pole. He also suggests the purchase of an artificial resuscitator to be used not only by the University in case of drowning but for asphyxia or injuries from electricity. Dr. Naismith recommends that there be some one in charge of the lake whenever students are allowed in the water.... He also suggests that a number of life preservers should be kept at convenient places."

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