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Archive for Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Data show this November to January is 16th warmest in Lawrence since 1909

Unseasonable temperatures in area have economic, agricultural effects

Shaun Gibbs, 12, racks hay into a pen of bison at his grandfather Don Gibbs’ Lone Star Lake Bison Ranch and Meat Co., near Overbrook, after school Wednesday. The herd of 18 bison, including 2.200-pound bull King Louie, left, have been moved from the pasture to the pen for the winter and get fed twice a day. According to data from the state climatologist, the November through mid-January average temperature of 39.5 degrees is three degrees above average.

Shaun Gibbs, 12, racks hay into a pen of bison at his grandfather Don Gibbs’ Lone Star Lake Bison Ranch and Meat Co., near Overbrook, after school Wednesday. The herd of 18 bison, including 2.200-pound bull King Louie, left, have been moved from the pasture to the pen for the winter and get fed twice a day. According to data from the state climatologist, the November through mid-January average temperature of 39.5 degrees is three degrees above average.

January 18, 2012

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Weather by the numbers, from Nov. 1 to Jan. 17

• Average temperature: 39.5 degrees.

• Average temperature since 1909: 36.2 degrees.

• The warmest on record was of 2001-02, with an average temperature of 43.9 degrees.

• The coldest was 1976-77, with an average temperature of 27.9 degrees.

— Numbers provided by the Kansas State Climatologist’s Office.

The past couple of days in Lawrence notwithstanding, it sure seems like it’s been a pretty warm winter so far.

And the numbers prove it.

The November through mid-January average temperature of 39.5 degrees — about three degrees above average — is the 16th warmest of that time frame in Lawrence since 1909, according to data compiled by Mary Knapp, state climatologist at the Kansas State Climatologist’s Office.

And while Lawrence has seen just a touch of snow this winter, it’s actually been the 12th-wettest from November to January, with the area receiving 8.36 inches of precipitation, nearly doubling the average precipitation of 4.58 inches since 1909.

The weather has had both economic and agricultural effects in the area.

Though statistically there’s been above-average precipitation, a lack of snow, which helps hold moisture in the soil, could be an issue with the upcoming growing season, said Bill Wood, director of the K-State Research and Extension office in Douglas County.

“It’s looking pretty dry right now,” he said.

And the warmer weather means that more insects may survive the winter and could be something to watch out for this year, Wood said. But Wood said that overall he doesn’t anticipate any huge problems in the local agricultural world because of the weather.

No snow also means no need for snow shovels and other winter-related items, creating a hole in sales at Cottin’s Hardware, said owner Linda Cottin.

“There’s definitely a downturn in the winter market,” she said.

But there’s a positive aspect, Cottin said, as they’ve been able to make up sales through an increased demand for outdoor-related products, such as exterior paint and lawn and garden supplies.

But they’ll keep winter products in stock just in case, Cottin said. This is Kansas, after all. And it’s only January.

That’s a pretty good idea, Knapp said, as there’s no way to know if the current weather trends will hold.

“In the plains, we can go pretty quickly from one temperature to another,” she said.

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Temperature averages

Average temperature for Lawrence between Nov. 1 and Jan. 17 since 1910. Information provided by the Kansas State Climatologist's Office.

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Average precipitation

Precipitation totals for Lawrence between Nov. 1 and Jan 17 since 1909. Information provided by the Kansas State Climatologist's Office.

Comments

The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

You know what this means???? Global Microwaving.

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NewbieGardener 2 years, 6 months ago

right...because climate is based on one singular season or even a year of weather. no wonder denialists like you have no idea how to interpret real science. I think Fox News will do it for you though...don't worry. Shhh.

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riverdrifter 2 years, 6 months ago

Since the advent of winter on Dec. 21 I've recorded a grand total of 0.09" of precipitation at my diggins. Dry winter thus far.

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alex_garrison 2 years, 6 months ago

@ riverdrifter & Original_Bob,

We've updated the story and headline to more clearly reflect the fact that the data range is from Nov. 1 (not winter, but when the data set begins) to Jan. 17.

Thanks.

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rockchalker52 2 years, 6 months ago

Drier than a popcorn fart. My fish grew legs, left the pond & walked to Clinton.

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RoeDapple 2 years, 6 months ago

Too much methane. Damn those pot bellied pigs.

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classclown 2 years, 6 months ago

The folks at city hall are probably glad they don't have to put up with calls from Eride every five minutes.

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riverdrifter 2 years, 6 months ago

TOB: They're using Nov. 1 to present. In that case I recorded 4.12" in Nov, 2.52" in Dec, and 0.04" in Jan. for a total of 6.68" in the same time frame. BTW, I drip tested my rain gage Oct. 30 and it was spot-on for accuracy. Top of the soil is OK but we're dry down lower. Water your trees & shrubs planted in the last year...

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Ken Lassman 2 years, 6 months ago

My Mom's snowdrop flowers, which typically bloom 3rd week of February and as early as the first week of February, are about ready to pop. If it weren't for this cold snap, they'd already be blooming. We'll see if the last few days froze them back.

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chzypoof1 2 years, 6 months ago

Why is this a story? 16th warmest huh? WOW. Breaking News! What's going to happen if this summer is the 12th hottest? Will it be the main story of the day???

ugh....

poof

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tomatogrower 2 years, 6 months ago

If you grow vegetable gardens, like I do, then it is a story. This will be rough on my gardens.

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alor 2 years, 6 months ago

Precipitation is misspelled twice on the "Average Precipitation" chart. Can you fix it, please?

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Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

We're all gonna die! However, most of us won't die because of the 16th warmest winter in Lawrence since 1909. Small business winters are to travel on multiple seasons for various purposes that may vary and they use alternative vehicle and courtesy winters. (from a source)

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davidmcg 2 years, 6 months ago

That boy looks just like my grandson, even has a coat like that. Lucky kid right there to be getting that education and memory.

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