Archive for Wednesday, January 18, 2012

100 years ago: Wolf hunt organized for area east of Lawrence

January 18, 2012

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From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for Jan. 18, 1912:

  • "Wolves are so numerous and bold in the Kaw Valley and along the Wakarusa Creek and are committing so many depredations on chickens, geese, turkeys and pigs that the Kaw Valley C.P.A. has decided to have a big wolf round up on Saturday, January 20th. The lines of the roundup will be formed as follows: Commencing at the southwest corner of the John Haskell farm, then east on the Eudora road six miles, then south four miles, then west six miles to the Fairview church, then north on the county farm road to the beginning.... Everybody is invited to assist in the wolf slaughter. Boys under sixteen will not be allowed to carry guns. No rifles of larger bore than 22 caliber will be allowed. No dogs will be permitted. Everybody is expected to be in line and ready to move on the enemy at half past nine. The round up will be on the John Gilmore meadow, east of old Franklin. Wolves captured on the Gilmore meadow will be sold to the highest bidder. The proceeds will be used to pay the expenses. If everybody will keep in line, obey the captains, and be careful with firearms the drive is an assured success."
  • "The University of Kansas proper is on Mount Oread in Lawrence, so you wouldn't think, would you, that this institution could be traveling all over the state? It is, however. University professors who have subjects in which the people are interested are becoming so much in demand that some of them can not possibly fill all the engagements. Their names are becoming known to the people of the state as those of men who have something to say that they, the people, are eager to hear."
  • "At one spot on the Wakarusa near the bridge at Diechmann's crossing, the water has not frozen and it is here that the fish like to come. As the fish come down into the ripple, the farmers catch them easily. Chris Schaake, who was in town today reported that there have been many carp caught in that place during the recent cold weather."
  • "That the people of Lawrence appreciate a good thing when they see it was shown by the enormous crowds that saw Dante's Inferno at the Aurora the last two days. Yesterday evening the sidewalk in front of the theatre was crowded by people who were trying to get in. Mr. Borshein, who brought the films here, said he never saw better satisfied or larger crowds. As a matter of fact the show was a marvel in staging and was one that Lawrence can be glad was here."
  • "The Journal-World is still receiving many complaints about the sidewalks not being cleared off. In West Lawrence some residents say that the walks are in a bad condition."

Comments

FlintlockRifle 3 years, 4 months ago

The "wolf" is really a coyote.They used to have them back in the 50's around the towns of Clinton and Belvoir. Lots of walking and was hard to keep the lines straight up and down the hills and throught the timber.

Sarah St. John 3 years, 4 months ago

I wondered about that, and I had a question already from a print-copy reader about the same thing. On the one hand, you'd think that people back then would have known the difference between a wolf and a coyote. On the other hand, were there really so many wolves around in 1912? Well, could be. We've already seen (see http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/dec...) that deer were extremely uncommon in this area back then. Perhaps because of the wolf population?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 4 months ago

Probably coyotes, not wolves.

"The subspecies of gray wolf once present in Kansas (Canis lupus nubilis Say) is now extinct throughout its range; the last specimen was reported in 1905. Early reports indicated that the gray wolf in Kansas preyed almost entirely upon bison. Gray wolves tend to feed on young, old, sick, or dead animals, and seldom are able to attack healthy mature ones. Thus, they serve to maintain healthy prey populations. These carnivores may live up to sixteen years in captivity, but rarely more than ten years in the wild."

For whatever reason, this site is not accepting active links right now. You'll have to copy and paste this address into your browser.

ksr.ku.edu/libres/mammals_of_kansas/canis-lupus.html

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 4 months ago

Test post. The website has not accepted that last three attempts.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 4 months ago

Probably coyotes, not wolves.

"The subspecies of gray wolf once present in Kansas (Canis lupus nubilis Say) is now extinct throughout its range; the last specimen was reported in 1905. Early reports indicated that the gray wolf in Kansas preyed almost entirely upon bison. Gray wolves tend to feed on young, old, sick, or dead animals, and seldom are able to attack healthy mature ones. Thus, they serve to maintain healthy prey populations. These carnivores may live up to sixteen years in captivity, but rarely more than ten years in the wild."

For whatever reason, this site is will not post anything with a web link in it. You'll have to google the text above if you want to see the whole article.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 4 months ago

Interesting-- the link to this discussion counted the posts I attempted to make (and which it said had been posted) but they are not appearing. Where are they going?

riverdrifter 3 years, 4 months ago

Sure, coyotes. The old coyote hunters of south Douglas county frequently referred to them as wolves when I was a kid. Nobody hunts them much anymore hereabout and so coyotes rule Douglas county today. I saw one cross Iowa St. westbound near 27th the other evening with either a firmly clinched squirrel or Siamese cat. Not sure which. Game night traffic? Not a problem.

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