Advertisement

Archive for Sunday, April 22, 2012

100 years ago: Police raid at ‘house of ill repute’ results in four arrests

April 22, 2012

Advertisement

From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for April 22, 1912:

"The local police department swooped down on the Cottage house at midnight Saturday night and secured a large quantity of confiscatable material and made four arrests of persons found in the place. The place hadn't been interfered with by the police for some time and the raid was very carefully planned. It is not believed that a single empty escaped the officers. A number of men seemingly under the influence of liquor were seen to emerge from the place shortly before the raid was made and what was found there confirmed to a large extent the suspicions aroused by these men.... Henry Scott, proprietor, this morning explained the presence of so many empties about his place by saying that they had been brought there by others. He denied having sold any liquor or having knowledge of any sales being made at his place. A. Sheppard, one of those found, was charged with vagrancy and with living at a house of ill repute.... When Sheppard learned that the house was being raided he lowered a jug containing whisky from the window of his room to the ground by means of a rope.... Dora Sheppard was also arrested. She was charged with parading the streets and begging and receiving money."

Comments

rbwaa 2 years, 8 months ago

i love that phrase - 'house of ill repute'

Sarah St. John 2 years, 8 months ago

I love how the "Cottage house" was so well known that there was no need to supply an address or even a general part of town. That, and the little detail about the guy trying to save his whisky bottle. :-)

FlintlockRifle 2 years, 8 months ago

Miss Sarah, you have done it again, what a find---keep up the good work--please, one request if you find anything about my family please don't print it----LOL

Flap Doodle 2 years, 8 months ago

"Disorderly house" was another polite term for brothel. That term may have been out of fashion by 1912. I think it was more of a 19th Century thing.

LadyJ 2 years, 8 months ago

"She was charged with parading the streets and begging and receiving money." We should see if that law is still on the books. It would be funny if it was.

.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.