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Archive for Monday, April 9, 2012

Rapist, murderer both eligible for parole in June

April 9, 2012

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Convicted murderer Wilford Molester Galloway and convicted serial rapist Charles Curtis Hunter — both convicted in Douglas County — are eligible for parole in June.

Prison photo of Wilford Molester Galloway, who was convicted of the 1997 shooting of Floyd White in Lawrence. Galloway, after serving 15 years in prison, is eligible for parole in June.

Prison photo of Wilford Molester Galloway, who was convicted of the 1997 shooting of Floyd White in Lawrence. Galloway, after serving 15 years in prison, is eligible for parole in June.

Prison photo of Charles Hunter, who was convicted of a string of sexual assaults and home invasions that occurred in December 1978. Hunter received an indeterminate sentence, and has been eligible for parole numerous times over the years. Hunter is currently eligible for parole in June.

Prison photo of Charles Hunter, who was convicted of a string of sexual assaults and home invasions that occurred in December 1978. Hunter received an indeterminate sentence, and has been eligible for parole numerous times over the years. Hunter is currently eligible for parole in June.

The Kansas Prison Review Board will hear public comments on both Galloway and Hunter’s cases, as well as 26 other convicts eligible for release in June. The board uses input from the public and victims in the cases as part of their decision. The public can also call or mail in comments.

Here’s more on the local cases:

• Galloway was convicted of first-degree murder in the 1997 shooting death of Floyd White. According to court records, Galloway shot White during an argument just outside of Lawrence, and left White’s body on the side of a road. Galloway was sentenced to life in prison, but is now eligible for release after 15 years behind bars. Galloway is incarcerated at the El Dorado Correctional Facility.

• Hunter was convicted of a series of rapes and home invasions that occurred in December 1978 in Lawrence. In 2010, Hunter, with assistance from the New York-based Innocence Project, obtained a DNA test on two of the rape kits in the case. However, the testing was not able to exclude Hunter as the rapist. Hunter originally was given a life sentence, and was first eligible for parole after 15 years. The parole board repeatedly has denied parole for Hunter, most recently in 2011. Hunter is incarcerated at the Larned State Hospital, operating by the Kansas Department of Corrections.

Here’s a list of the three public comment sessions:

• 10 a.m. to noon April 16, City Hall, 701 N. Seventh St., Kansas City, Kan.

• 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 17, Finney State Building, 230 E. William St., Wichita.

• 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. April 18, Landon State Office Building, 900 S.W. Jackson, Topeka.

For full list of inmates eligible for parole and for contact information, visit http://bit.ly/Hg9aSD.

Comments

suzchase 2 years, 8 months ago

Is his middle name really "Molester"? Can that be right?

jafs 2 years, 8 months ago

Sure.

Are you willing to pay the extra taxes to keep folks in jail for life? It's pretty expensive.

jhawkinsf 2 years, 8 months ago

Yes. I would certainly advocate that more of my taxes go to keep these violent people in prison and less goes for other things. And before you ask, I'll state upfront that I also want more money going to education. And where will all this money come from? An increase in taxes on everyone. Everyone. No exceptions. None.

somebodynew 2 years, 8 months ago

OK, what part of this sentence, "Hunter is incarcerated at the Larned State Hospital, operating by the Kansas Department of Corrections.", makes anyone think this guy is ready to be released back into public ??? He is in LSH for a reason, and that is not because he has been a model inmate !!!

Personally, I want to see both of these guys stay in.

CrystalKU 2 years, 8 months ago

Just because he is at LSH doesn't mean he has been a troublesome inmate, it just means that he needs increased mental health care. I have seen some inmates from TCF (where I work) that have been considered model inmates but need a more stable, therapeutic mental health environment. What it does say is he will need a good case manager and lots of services when he leaves to remain stabilized with chronic mental health conditions.

somebodynew 2 years, 8 months ago

Well maybe you should volunteer to manage him with his "chronic mental health conditions". I know both of these 'gentlemen' and don't want either of them back among the population. If he needs a "more stable, therapeutic mental health environment", well he already has it where he is at and we don't run the risk of what happens when he decides not to take his meds.

Kat Christian 2 years, 8 months ago

good grief without a doubt Gallaway should have Life in Prison for killing a man and especially for leaving his body on the side of the road. This is what is wrong with our judical system to much leniency - anyone can kill these days and if they have enough money and really good attorney good chance they'll only serve a mininum sentence and be back out in society to offend again. Its like a revolving door - yet how many innocent people have to be subjected to these misfits in society? They cannot be rehibilitated - you can't rehibilitate a murderer and bring the dead person back and brush him off and say opps I'm sorry, my bad go on with your life. An eye for an eye - he needs and anyone else who has commited murder needs to stay in prison for life or have the death penality imposed within a lesser time frame then then do today.

Fatty_McButterpants 2 years, 8 months ago

Sunshine - the judicial system has been forced to become more lenient simply because of overcrowding. Everyone wants the criminals to stay in prison for the full sentence, but no one wants to pay for new prisons to be built; thus, the only solution is to release some folks that probably should not.

Liberty275 2 years, 8 months ago

The Constitution forbids unusual punishment. The only crime serious enough to be the peer of our government's "crime of muder" should be reserved for only the most heinous murders. Killing a person is a crime unlike any other and is the only one where the debt and payment can be remotely similar. If the crime doesn't have extraordinary aggravating circumstances, death shouldn't' be warranted.

Rape is horrible, but the most you could suffer as punishment would be the most compassionate rape - and then you go free. I think we should stick to years (all they have left) for rapists.

Not that the death penalty should even exist. It's barbaric and dumb. 2012 and we are still allowing and cheering the killing of fellow Americans. You'd think we'd have gotten passed that by now.

RonBurgundy 2 years, 8 months ago

Galloway was convicted of 1st degree murder. Meaning he intentionly took a man's life. He made the conscious decision to kill a living human being. Why should we not put people like him to death? If the penalties were a little more severe in this country, then maybe less people would committ them. The death penalty is far under used. We shouldn't even waste time and our tax money by putting these people in prison. They should be led straight to the execution chamber from the courtroom.

Liberty275 2 years, 8 months ago

Do we need to kill people, really? If you die in prison, why is one means of death more preferable. I'm not staunchly against the death penalty, as I should be, but I don't think willfully killing a man is near horrendous enough to justify death. We should save that ultimate punishment for serial killers, terrorist-type killers like the OKC bomber and adults that murder children in cold blood.

I'm not even sure why I support state-sponsored any killing of Americans. I should be against it all, but sometimes revenge is a strong drive. Maybe in a thousand years I'll be over it.

"They should be led straight to the execution chamber from the courtroom."

That's plainly unconstitutional as all men are allowed at least one appeal, and on the day we no longer have that we open up ourselves to harm by corrupt judges, inept public defenders or mistakes made in the original trial.

How many of your rights are you willing to surrender to kill an American? I don't want to kill any American bad enough to surrender anything.

BlackVelvet 2 years, 8 months ago

"The parole board repeatedly has denied parole for Hunter, most recently in 2011." If Hunter was denied parole in 2011, why in the world is he eligible again already? That's just wrong!

Paula Kissinger 2 years, 8 months ago

Again, folks...this is the law that is in effect that allows these creatures the ability to be paroled and, without strong opposition, they most likely will be back in our community in June. The prisons are pretty full, you know. If you have ever had any personal dealings with these criminals write the parole board or attend one of the public comments sessions to voice your outrage that they might be unleashed on us. As far as the laws that govern the parole system...remember this at election time because the legislature makes the laws.

Liberty275 2 years, 8 months ago

Galloway, 5 more years, Hunter, LIFE.

Also, publishing the pictures so prominently was in very bad taste.

BlackVelvet 2 years, 8 months ago

I don't think it was in bad taste. I think the public has a right to know what these folks look like.

Paula Kissinger 2 years, 8 months ago

The photos were taken from the KASPER website which is a public website. I applaud the LJW for taking an interest in notifying the community that convicted felons of violent personal attacks are coming up for parole so the citizens will be aware of it.

Jayhawk1958 2 years, 8 months ago

Look into Hunter's eyes. They tell everything. DO NOT RELEASE THIS CREATURE!

buffalo63 2 years, 8 months ago

Since they were convicted in Douglas County, why no hearing in this county? Why would someone have to travel if they wanted to attend?

somebodynew 2 years, 8 months ago

That is just the way they do things. It is that way for all of the potential parolees. I also don't agree with it, but I am sure with tight budgets, it is not going to change.

Dennis MacMillan 2 years, 8 months ago

Time to let these guys out.....The authorities need more room for pot smokers......

Clark Coan 2 years, 8 months ago

Is Wilford related to the Galloway the serial rapist who was up for parole recently?

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