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Archive for Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Occupy Lawrence notifies city that some campers plan to stay in South Park despite warnings from city

T.J. Campsey, a protester with Occupy Lawrence, talks about the group's meeting with a delegation of city officials, who told them to leave the park by Thursday night.

October 19, 2011, 11:01 p.m. Updated October 20, 2011, 9:10 p.m.

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Protesters in the Occupy Lawrence camp at South Park converse in a circle on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011 shortly after meeting with several city officials earlier in the afternoon. The protesters were told to leave the park by Thursday night as their permit to remain overnight had expired.

Protesters in the Occupy Lawrence camp at South Park converse in a circle on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011 shortly after meeting with several city officials earlier in the afternoon. The protesters were told to leave the park by Thursday night as their permit to remain overnight had expired.

UPDATE:

Toni Wheeler, the city's director of the Legal Department, said two representatives from Occupy Lawrence came to her office in City Hall at 8:30 a.m. today to notify her that a "contingent" of Occupy Lawrence members would continue to camp in the park despite a warning from the city that they would be violating a law that prohibits use of the park during overnight hours.

"They weren't specific about how large the contingent would be," Wheeler said.

Wheeler said she was now in discussions with various city officials to determine what the city's enforcement strategy will be. Wheeler said she did not anticipate the city taking any enforcement action prior to 11:30 p.m. today, which is when the park closes for the day.

By city ordinance, Lawrence parks close from 11:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. Wheeler previously has said the city would have the legal right to remove the campers from the park, but she has stopped short of saying whether that will be the approach the city takes to enforce the law.

Sgt. Matt Sarna, a Lawrence police spokesman, at 4:30 p.m. Thursday said the city and police department were "working together to find options and facilitate the protestors' expression of freedom of speech."

"The Lawrence Police Department is committed to enforcing the laws and ordinances within the city limits of Lawrence including parks that have set usage hours. This enforcement could include citations, arrests or other types of enforcement actions deemed necessary," Sarna said. "The City of Lawrence Police Department has no formal timeline on enforcement action at this time and is hoping for a peaceful resolution to the situation."

At 7 p.m., members of Occupy Lawrence agreed by consensus that those who wished could stay in the park past 11:30 p.m. The group also voted to remove a majority of their camping equipment to a location off site.

Occupy Lawrence member Jason Phoenix proposed a resolution which would see the group leave South Park and occupy other parks for one or two days at a time before moving on.

"It's not about South Park, it's about continuing to spark conversation," Phoenix said.

Continue to check back to LJWorld.com for more developments.

Here's the earlier story:

They’re staying. At least some of them are.

About 20 members of the Occupy Lawrence group indicated Wednesday evening that they plan to continue camping in South Park, even though Lawrence’s chief of police and other city officials warned them the city would begin enforcing a law that prohibits camping in city parks.

After a meeting of more than three hours — which featured protesters huddled in a circle around donated propane heaters, speechmakers standing on a stump, and a voting system that involves several types of hand signals — many members said the Occupy Lawrence movement needed to move into a new phase of civil disobedience.

“Lawrence residents shouldn’t only expect civil disobedience but they should participate in it,” said camper David Hughes-Pfeifer.

At various times in the evening, about 50 protesters participated in the discussion — or the “general assembly” as the Occupy Lawrence group labels its nightly meeting. Not all group members agreed to camp at the park and risk fines or arrests from the city. But the group did unanimously agree to formally support those members who choose to keep camping in the park.

Several group members said that camping in the park was an important part of the protests, not only for the visibility it provides the organization but also because of the message it sends.

“I have a nice house just a few blocks from this park that I could be sleeping in right now,” said Chelsea Donoho. “It is ridiculous that I’m sleeping in this park. But the reason it is important that we continue sleeping in this park is because it shows how damn serious we are.”

Gus Bova — a Lawrence resident, Kansas University student and an employee at a local pizza shop — said a poll of people at the park indicated about 20 people were preparing to continue camping, despite the city’s order to stop the activity by this evening. Bova, though, said he thinks the group may gain more campers as news of the city’s pending action spreads across town.

“I think people are realizing that a film screening or going door-to-door isn’t enough,” Bova said. “If that was enough to create change, we wouldn’t be here. Sometimes extreme times call for extreme measures. That’s really what this movement is about.”

A little after 1 p.m. Wednesday, Lawrence Police Chief Tarik Khatib, along with the city’s director of the Legal Department and Parks and Recreation officials, told the group of about 30 campers that their permit to stay in the park overnight has expired. Toni Wheeler, director of the Legal Department, said she told the group that the city expected the campers to remove their tents and no longer use the park between the hours of 11:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. — which is the time that the park is considered officially closed.

But Wheeler said the city did give the campers assurance that police would take no action Wednesday evening to enforce the no-camping provision. Instead, she expects the group to call her office by 8:30 a.m. today to notify her they intend to comply with the city’s laws regarding the park.

After Wednesday night’s meeting, though, the group agreed to tell Wheeler that it is likely some campers will remain in the park despite the city’s orders. The group also will tell Wheeler that the campers will have the support of the Occupy Lawrence movement, which grew out of the Occupy Wall Street movement that is protesting economic inequality, the role corporations play in government and several other themes.

Wheeler stopped short of saying that the city would physically remove the campers if they fail to comply, but she said the city would have the right to do so.

“If they do not leave, they could be cited for a violation of the city code and they would be in the park without the legal authority to be there and they could be removed,” Wheeler said.

Jennifer Dillon, a member of Occupy Lawrence who has been serving as a liaison to city officials, said a Lawrence police captain told her that the city was not planning to make arrests of campers tonight, although they may start issuing tickets.

A spokesman with the police department late Wednesday couldn’t confirm that conversation, but said city officials would take an appropriate amount of time in evaluating potential enforcement strategies.

Wheeler said the city’s code related to illegally staying in a city park has a broad penalty provision. It allows for the Municipal Court judge to issue of a fine of not less than $1 but not more than $1,000 for each offense, up to 180 days in jail or both a fine and jail time.

Wheeler, though, said she told campers that the city does not object to the campers using the park during the normal operating hours of the park.

“We did stress to them that we are fully supportive of them using the park in the daytime hours, even if it is day after day after day, as long as they remove their belongings and leave the park when it closes,” Wheeler said.

On Wednesday evening, however, several campers were preparing for the possibility of being arrested. Several were writing in magic marker on their forearms the telephone number of an attorney who previously had told the crowd that he would represent any protesters who were arrested.

Comments

Liberal 2 years, 6 months ago

Just make them pay a camping fee, provide a portapotty and let them stay. I want to see how long they will stay there.

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Armored_One 2 years, 6 months ago

There are so many flaws with this entire movement that I am honestly suprised that it is still in existance.

We want a change in tax laws, so let's screw with Wall Street and disrupt not only the 'movers and shakers' but also the viability of most every 401k program in existance today.

We want the rich to pay more taxes, so let's endanger our health and sit in a park. Not protest, or pass around a petition, or even sound off with a chant. We'll just sit here. At least the sit in's at lunch counters had a directed purpose.

We want to increase the amount of money businesses are forced to pay for taxes, but refuse to accept the other side of that coin. We increase their tax burden, they increase their prices to offset that 'loss', which only backhands everyone in this nation, protestors and non alike.

We have an issue with politicians, but instead of presenting them with a list of greivances, as the Constitution protects, we cause issues for financial institutions and stock trading.

The logic is not apparent to me, but the things I have listed are. I really don't think that I am missing anything, but if I am, I have no doubts that those that feel attacking the finances of a businessman is a good way to enact legal changes will point them out.

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dogsandcats 2 years, 6 months ago

I don't understand the choice of South Park as the place they are occupying. What has South Park ever done to anyone? All they are doing is ruining the park and making it so that no one else can use it. Seems selfish and unthoughtful to me.

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Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

They should occupy the yard of a certain prolific poster. (from a source)

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sunny 2 years, 6 months ago

Arrest them and put them jail. Let them call the attorney written on the arm. The attorney must be as ignorant as they are!

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ksrush 2 years, 6 months ago

I'm sure jail will not be an unfamiliar site to many of the fleabaggers

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Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

Hey, ag discovered wiki. He'll be an expert on everything now....

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oletimer 2 years, 6 months ago

you break the law. you go to jail. Right? Oh wait, that was before all the crybabies ran the place. we are so afraid of making people mad that the laws are forgotten. Again. You are dumb enough to break the law, you should expect to go to jail. End of story.

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The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

"How anyone can look at this torrent of comments and not think that these protesters have accomplished raising awareness is beyond me." Field Tested

No, I'm pretty sure everyone knows the government and financial institutions have been giving us the high, hard one for a long time. A bunch of folks sitting in a park isn't going to cure anything. Pitchforks and duct tape will.

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Dr_Noh 2 years, 6 months ago

Don't occupy South Park. I recommend occupying Doug Compton's front lawn.

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FieldTested 2 years, 6 months ago

How anyone can look at this torrent of comments and not think that these protesters have accomplished raising awareness is beyond me. Agree or disagree, "the whole world's watching."

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demonfury 2 years, 6 months ago

It really saddens me to know that the Mayor himself has caused such an upheaval because he isn't smart enough to consult with his legal dept before he makes an open statement allowing citizens to break a law that he himself is charged with overseeing the enforcement of. I'm still debating on whether or not I should be surprised.

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Centerville 2 years, 6 months ago

So, the OWS-ers want more taxes (and don't fool yourself: the definition of "financial transaction" won't be restricted to re-arranging hedge funds) so the politicians can have more money to send to their buddies?

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demonfury 2 years, 6 months ago

This whole situation is a joke at best. For some unknown reason, all of my previous posts on this matter have been deleted or lost in the abyss. I guess I can't state my opinion here if it's anti-Cromwell, or anit-City Commission. Long and short of it is that this "occupy" group is breaking the law, and Cromwell gave them permission to do it. Both parties are at fault, and both parties should be dismissed. One from South Park at 11:30 tonight for failure to hold the legally required permits, and Cromwell for allowing this to happen in the first place. He must be held accountable for his decisions. His job is to see to it that this city upholds the laws on the books, and he failed to to that by openly allowing them to stay as long as they like so long as they were peaceful. If I remain peaceful, can I camp out in Cromwell's front yard and protest his leadership failures?

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moot 2 years, 6 months ago

have you seen the campers? they look like vagrants. the real protesters have left. now its just homeless people and gutter punks.

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moot 2 years, 6 months ago

at least the city of lawrence and the police let them do it over teh weekend. now they are pushing it.

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Haiku_Cuckoo 2 years, 6 months ago

"I think people are realizing that a film screening or going door-to-door isn't enough."

I disagree completely. Going door to door would have a much bigger impact. At least you could personally tell people what changes you're hoping for. Sitting around a public park all day doesn't convey any sort of message apart from the fact that you seem to enjoy camping. What specific change needs to happen in order for this protest to be considered successful? Does anyone know? Again, what specific goal? Help me understand. Heck, come knock on my door and tell me if need be.

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myparcelisseceding 2 years, 6 months ago

Protesters, do what you will. No law made by man serves anyone else but that man. Fines? Give them back their federal notes, they are worth nothing anyway. Discover true wealth among yourselves

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newmedia 2 years, 6 months ago

Either enforce the ordinance or repeal it. No special favors here...

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autie 2 years, 6 months ago

Some uses of the an online dictionary are impressively not relevant. I think the point is the nay sayers don't understand the point the Occupy South Parkers are even trying to make. When I boil off all the fat of corporate evil or long haired unemployed whatever....fact is the corporate machinery is in collusion with the government they bought and paid for with the intent of promoting policy that enhances their position at the expense of everyone else. And all of the everyone else is just getting fed up with taking it up the tail pipe from top 1% spongers. And all the while these upper 1%'ers are getting huge breaks and favors from the system they created.

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Jimo 2 years, 6 months ago

The key here is that protesting is a First Amendment right. The City can make reasonable restrictions on that right to serve important governmental interests -- public safety, health, any conflicting civil rights of others. However, as with other First Amendment rights, governmentally imposed restrictions are subject to heightened scrutiny. This is in contrast to random park vistors, homeless people, vagrants, squatters, or any other persons for which the City's 'no camping' policy does not trigger heightened scrutiny.

Here, the City would need to show not merely that it has a rational reason for its 'no camping' policy and applies that policy impartially. That's all the City has to show with regard to the general public. Rather--for First Amendment protesters--the City must show that its policy serves an important governmental interest that out-weighs the First Amendment as well as that its policy is the least restrictive limitation on these rights that can achieve its important governmental interests.

Maybe the City can do this but it is not obvious that the City can. (1) The City so far doesn't seem able to articulate very well what its important interest is exactly. (And the burden of proof will lie with the City to prove the validity of its stated interest.) (2) Absent that, it's impossible to evaluate whether less restrictive but workable options are available. I'm not saying that the City definitely is violating the protesters civil rights. But I am saying that the City is opening itself up to a lawsuit whose outcome is not clearly in the City's--or the taxpayers'--favor.

In short: these Occupyers may look like vagrants to you but they do not look the same to the Constitution.

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deec 2 years, 6 months ago

There has been a great deal of misinformation about what the movement is fighting against. While the slogans specifically reference Wall Street, and the media has focused on the message of corruption of corporations, many in the movement are aware of, and equally upset with, the corruption in government. It all ties together. They are two sides of the same coin. A good analogy might be a working girl and her client. The problem is, it is virtually impossible to tell which is which. Both the 1% and government are guilty. Who is more guilty? The one selling their wares, or the buyer? Just one example of the corruption is that Congress members and their staff are exempt from insider trading laws. http://www.forbes.com/sites/kylesmith/2011/06/01/insider-trading-rules-that-dont-apply-to-congress/

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Benthic 2 years, 6 months ago

Cut your hair and get a job.

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happygolucky 2 years, 6 months ago

Just arrest them all at 11:31. If not, can we start smoking pot and hanging out with hookers? Why bend on one law if we can bend on others? What makes them so special that they are above the law? I get their point, but you still have to follow the law. Camp in your yard, not our park. I don't run my dog in your yard or let my kids run a play around your house, if you even have one.

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The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

"Didn't realize that spreading the message of something you believe in is considered nothing. " Engagedecoy

So, your plan is to sit in a park and hope people come to you for information that you have already mentioned several times is freely available on the internet? Quite the odd protest plan you have there.

When is your shift on here up this afternoon? I hope the next guy defending the South Park Sitters is nicer. If you a representative of the Sitters then I don't think there will be more than 30 people staying.

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autie 2 years, 6 months ago

The_Original_Bob(anonymous) says…

"Irrelevant. Everyone breaks the law, get out of here with your holier than thou attitude." EngageDecoy that should probably be "not relevant". But that is a whole other argument.

That's the dumbest thing I've read all morning. And I read some of Autie's posts on the OTS Get out of here with your holier than thou attitude. Go make me a rum ham.

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The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

"Even if Occupy Wall Street should evaporate, the fuel that's feeding it will not." Engagedecoy

I agree completely. And Occupy Wall Street will end because a better tactic will be utilized. The South Park Sitters are accomplishing nothing.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 2 years, 6 months ago

I accomplished more by occupying the water closet for 10 mins this morning than these people have by occupying South Park.

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The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

Hadley - They had performed service and didn't get paid. Nobody is going to give these cats out at the park anything by sitting on lawn chairs. The should at least march.

Although, it has provided loads of comedy via engagedecoy.

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Hadley_says 2 years, 6 months ago

Remember Bob, that even our Veterans have been required to "sit around and do nothing" (and receive criticism like yours) in a public park space to highlight economic injustice and broken government promises.

In fact is it kinda how this country got started in the first place.

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darthtaco 2 years, 6 months ago

The police are salivating at the thoughts of a Tieniman square style red state crackdown. You red staters have become the very evil this country was formed against. I hope the city gets entrenched in a massive lawsuit over this.

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The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

"Irrelevant. Everyone breaks the law, get out of here with your holier than thou attitude." EngageDecoy

That's the dumbest thing I've read all morning. And I read some of Autie's posts on the OTS.

So, sitting around doing nothing is going change something?

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kseagle 2 years, 6 months ago

Really simple solution. Load them all up into a van take them out to the country, preferrably 30 to 40 miles out, and dump them there. You want to "camp" do it where it is supposed to be done, not in the city park. So many solutions are then solved!!

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Bouncer 2 years, 6 months ago

Just offer the campers a job. That should chase them off. Maybe Mayor Cromwell should make such an offer. I will offer an 8-man tent to any homeless group that would like to counter the protest by moving in across the street permanently. The City officials round up the homeless and run them off or run them in. If you people really want fairness then encourage the homeless to occupy South Park permanently. Loring Henderson will make sure they don't go hungry.

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flux 2 years, 6 months ago

The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson

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rockchalk1977 2 years, 6 months ago

"Public Radio Host Fired After Involvement in 'Occupy D.C.' Protest"

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/10/20/public-radio-host-fired-after-involvement-in-occupy-dc-protest/

You malcontents could be next. And, how would 180 days in jail look on the old resume? Think about your future. Give up and occupy a shower stall.

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Fred Whitehead Jr. 2 years, 6 months ago

Where did I say or indicate any notion that money makes one above the law? Which laws are you referring to? What sort of outcome do you desire at this display of useless grandstanding? Give me some indication of just what you mean in your last post, what will be accoumplished? What sort of outcome do you expect? How will this do anyone any good?

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Fred Whitehead Jr. 2 years, 6 months ago

So now we really know the true intent of the protesters, to find a way to violate the law and be a public nuisance. I am sure that the people on Wall Street in New York are shaking in their boots to learn that the "Great Unwashed" of H.L. Mencken in Lawrence, Kansas are going to break the law to make their useless point. What a great day for this community! None of this absolute foolishness will make any difference whatsoever and it is most amusing to see these old hippies beat their heads against a concrete wall yowling about something that they have absolutely no control over nor comprehension of. I doubt that any of them have accounts with any financial institution that they so vehmently abhor.

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The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

"They're fighting for what's good for you and you and you."

By breaking the law sitting in a park doing nothing?

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John Pultz 2 years, 6 months ago

I don't get it. Aren't the Occupy Lawrence, Wall Street, etc., people fighting for what most Americans need at this point: A system that responds to the many and not the rich, a system that meets the needs of people and not banks and corporations. I for one am glad that these people have time to make a point I would make if I had the time to do it. Why so much anger at them? They're fighting for what's good for you and you and you.

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John Pultz 2 years, 6 months ago

I don't get it. Aren't the Occupy Lawrence, Wall Street, etc., people fighting for what most Americans need at this point: A system that responds to the many and not the rich, a system that meets the needs of people and not banks and corporations. I for one am glad that these people have time to make a point I would make if I had the time to do it. Why so much anger at them? They're fighting for what's good for you and you and you.

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akt2 2 years, 6 months ago

The more attention, the better they like it. They'll pack it in when the snow starts flying sideways. I'd also like to protest the fact that I wouldn't have the time or energy to protest anything even if I wanted to. Maybe I could pencil some time in for protesting after I take my daughter to school, go to work for eight hours, stop by the grocery store, fix dinner, and plan for the next days work and school. And everything else in between.

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BBalls 2 years, 6 months ago

It would be nice if the would OccupyAJob instead of OccupyLawrence.

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Barry Watts 2 years, 6 months ago

Go home, you are wasting your time. Those 20 just want to get arrested and make a big scene so they cry about the injustice of government and law enforcement... bla bla bla.

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ST3V3N 2 years, 6 months ago

How is ruining Lawrence and breaking the law going to change anything? Well I guess eventually it will change their arrest record. NYC is the last place any town should aspire to be like.

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thebigspoon 2 years, 6 months ago

As cold as it is getting at night I would guess they wouldn't mind spending the night in a warm jail instead of in those tents ????

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pepper_bar 2 years, 6 months ago

If the po-po don't make any arrests tonight, I suspect every hobo in Lawrence will move their stuff to South Park.

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foodforthought 2 years, 6 months ago

Maybe I'm wrong but the last time I checked All city property was owned by the citizens of that city! Not the commission.

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FalseHopeNoChange 2 years, 6 months ago

(From a source)

Occupy's busting out on a new path ... So Adbusters is asking people all around the world to march on Oct. 29. "We want to send a clear message that we the people want to slow down this global casino." And Adbusters does have one specific demand, a 1 percent tax on financial-sector transactions (perhaps stocks, bonds, foreign-currency trades and derivatives). Some form of that idea, known as the "Robin Hood" tax, has been around for a while and might actually fly. – Jerry Large/Seattle Times

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demonfury 2 years, 6 months ago

Here's what really needs to happen. Mayor Cromwell (such as he is) should issue a public apology to this group (such as they are). He needs to issue a public apology to the good people of Lawrence for openly allowing this group to protest without the required permits, thereby authorizing them to break the laws that he is required to see are upheld. He then needs to instruct his Chief of Police to offer only 1 opportunity to this group to come into compliance (because of his faults). Then he needs to voluntary step down as Mayor for his blatant disregard of the laws that he is elected to uphold. He failed the Occupy Lawrence Organization, his own legal dept., he failed the police dept., and he failed the law abiding citizens of Lawrence. He is a disgrace, and does not deserve to represent the good people of Lawrence. His behavior is reprehensible, irresponsible, and downright neglectful of his office. Anything less would be another crime against the people of Lawrence.

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Michael Rowland 2 years, 6 months ago

Got an excellent chant for Occupy Lawrence protestor until they nail down exactly what they're protesting for: "Give me Liberty or give me something else!"

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progressive_thinker 2 years, 6 months ago

From my perspective, city officials have done an incredibly good job of addressing the situation with the campers. There has been no “knee jerk” reaction or unwarranted use of force that would only serve to strengthen the case of the protesters. Instead, the city has wisely chosen a slow, deliberate, thoughtful, and diplomatic approach to a problem involving citizens. City officials would be correct in concluding that, because there is no immediate threat to public safety, there is no reason to risk injury to any person by undertaking a forced eviction at this time.

The city is to be commended in this regard. I hope that the city will continue to use a well measured response which avoids the unnecessary use of tax dollars on arrest and incarceration of protesters, or potential litigation regarding unnecessary use of force.

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engagedecoy 2 years, 6 months ago

Population, 2010 87,643 Okay, so that is an accurate estimate. I am stand corrected. Back to the topic, you say "This is a nation of laws". I can almost 100% Guarantee, at some point in your busy day, you are breaking 1 or more laws, should we arrest you and throw you in jail over something stupid like speeding?

I am amazed that instead of just ticketing the offenders and trying to remain as peaceful as the protesters have been, our city would rather WASTE even more tax dollars by arresting these peaceful people and locking them further into the system and spending more tax dollars that way.

Ticket them and leave them alone.

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Armored_One 2 years, 6 months ago

Again, I ask what about the rights of those that might wish to use the park without having to deal with their nonsense?

What is the point of having laws if there is no enforcement of them?

20 people out of what, 70-100 thousand people in this city, give or take a couple grand, and those 20 are allowed to flaunt a law that the rest of us have to abide by 24/7/365 or face stiff penalties. We are still a nation of laws and those laws need to be observed.

And as to this nonsense that corporations control the government...

Nothing says you have to vote for biggest pee'er in the pool, so to speak. There are usually a few different options, plus the ultimate opt-out, which is the write in vote for whatever canidate you wish. If there was TRULY this much dissatisfaction, the entire sitting membership of Congress would be ousted within a couple of years, 5 at the most.

This is more about people feeling left out of something, or maybe left out of everything and feeling the need to participate since they haven't participated in anything since the civil rights movement. We all learned about Rosa Parks and Dr. King but anyone born in the mid 70s and later never learned what was truly causing it because we grew up in a world that was moving past those times.

If you feel left out, maybe it's because your apathy has left you with little to no options.

This is a nation of laws, but 99 out 100 never truly utilize those laws. 50 years ago, everyone knew them and used them, so there wasn't this huge gap between everyone. We stopped and wanted everyone else to do it for us, instead of sticking our nose into it. You brought it on yourselves.

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catfishturkeyhunter 2 years, 6 months ago

Its going to take another civil war to straighten this country out.

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campblood 2 years, 6 months ago

these comments are hilarious! thanks everyone...

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The_Original_Bob 2 years, 6 months ago

"Facism."

Fantastic. At least it is an ethos.

There are 20 of them? They are just sitting there with their hands in their pockets.

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nut_case 2 years, 6 months ago

What are they actually protesting again?

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kernal 2 years, 6 months ago

Ok, campers. I take it that the 20, or so, of you who are considering not leaving the park don't have jobs to lose, can afford to pay the attorney, court costs and a fine (court costs and fine will NOT be waived), have adequate funds to keep up your rent payments, cell phone and internet fees and utilities in addition to the aforementioned and don't have classes at KU. If that's the case, then go for it! Just make sure this is truly a cause that will be worth the hassles you will be facing. Personally, I don't think it is and you've already made your case.

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lunacydetector 2 years, 6 months ago

"A Marxist ... logically proceeds to the revolution to end capitalism, then into the third stage of reorganization into a new social order of the dictatorship of the proletariat, and finally the last stage -- the political paradise of communism."

Saul Alinsky (1909-1972)

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Phillbert 2 years, 6 months ago

“I think people are realizing that a film screening or going door-to-door isn’t enough,” Bova said. “If that was enough to create change, we wouldn’t be here. Sometimes extreme times call for extreme measures. That’s really what this movement is about.”


What IS the movement about? If it is about enacting actual changes in laws, then going door-to-door registering voters and getting them to vote for candidates who support your views is more than enough.

Right now the local movement (and OWS in general) seems to be more about getting attention for itself rather than taking the steps needed to enact actual change.

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fancy80 2 years, 6 months ago

pent, please don't speak for all of Lawrence. Thanks!!

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pentiuman 2 years, 6 months ago

Campers - please don't think that city representatives are representitive of the greater public here in Lawrence, as we do care about people and relevant issues.

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classclown 2 years, 6 months ago

Does that park have sprinklers? Perhaps the grass could use a good watering.

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Richard Heckler 2 years, 6 months ago

The larger issue is Wall Street fraud which goes unchallenged by the legal system. Wall Street fraud negatively impacted millions upon million upon millions and took down the nations economy beginning in 2007. 11 million employed became unemployed.

Yes there are larger issues. Too bad the entire world must demonstrate to get justice.

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darthtaco 2 years, 6 months ago

I see it now, a city hard core crackdown...Tieniman square right there in lawrence....with hundreds of screamin braindead redstate teabaggers yelling it on...lol hahaha let em occupy....

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Eride 2 years, 6 months ago

"Several were writing in magic marker on their forearms the telephone number of an attorney who previously had told the crowd that he would represent any protesters who were arrested."

LOL

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ljwhirled 2 years, 6 months ago

Here is the story where the Chad Lawhorn stated:

"Mayor Aron Cromwell says the city has no intention of kicking the occupiers out any time soon, at least so long as they continue to be peaceful." http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/oct...

Now they are getting kicked out?

Is this just Chad getting one on one quotes with various folks and playing them against each other for a story? Did the city change its position all of a sudden? If so, when was the change made and where was the public discourse? Was this the reason for the behind the scenes meeting between the Commission and the legal dept last night?

So many questions, so few answers.

Here are my 0.02$:

Ticket the protesters, but don't arrest them. Then have the city commission forgive the fines on a one-time-only basis.

This enforces the law, but grants clemency. That way if the Phelps clan sets up camp, you can still ticket them ($1,000/Camper/Night) and ......oh, no.......no clemency for bigots.

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Jimo 2 years, 6 months ago

And the Lord hardened the heart of Pharaoh, and he hearkened not unto them; as the Lord had spoken unto Moses.

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ljwhirled 2 years, 6 months ago

So Mayor Cromwell says they can stay, but the legal dept and the police department say they have to go.

Who is in charge in this city? The elected representatives or the city manager (ex-head of the legal department)?

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