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Archive for Monday, March 28, 2011

McLouth senior Trevor Roberts who lost part of his leg after football injury will get special prosthetic to help with running

Trevor Roberts, a McLouth High School senior, lost the lower part of his leg after a football injury. Today, with the help of a prosthetic, he is playing on the McLouth High baseball team.

March 28, 2011

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Trevor Roberts, right, is playing spring baseball with McLouth High School.

Trevor Roberts, right, is playing spring baseball with McLouth High School.

Trevor Roberts warms up his pitching arm along the fence line during the McLouth High baseball practice Friday. Roberts lost his left leg in a McLouth football game last fall.

Trevor Roberts warms up his pitching arm along the fence line during the McLouth High baseball practice Friday. Roberts lost his left leg in a McLouth football game last fall.

Trevor Roberts took some pitching time on the mound during practice Friday. Roberts lost his left leg in a McLouth football game last fall.

Trevor Roberts took some pitching time on the mound during practice Friday. Roberts lost his left leg in a McLouth football game last fall.

Trevor Roberts, left, holds his bat at his side as he waits his turn to swing after McLouth teammate Wyatt Farris, center.

Trevor Roberts, left, holds his bat at his side as he waits his turn to swing after McLouth teammate Wyatt Farris, center.

If you ask Trevor Roberts if the road was difficult, you’ll get a quick shrug and a smile.

He’s over it.

“Just livin’ life,” he said.

The McLouth High School senior lost the lower part of his left leg last fall after a football injury.

A compound fracture of his tibia and fibula led to gangrene, and a doctor told him he’d either lose his leg or his life.

But today, he’s already back on the school’s baseball team and has plans to play even more sports.

And that’s thanks to the many people — both inside and outside the community — who extended a helping hand, Roberts and his guardians said.

“There are so many people, it’s just impossible to name them,” said Lisa Humerickhouse, Roberts’ legal guardian.

The donations have been coming from all over the place. Roberts got $3,000 from a man in California he’d never met, Humerickhouse said. A check came recently from the Basehor-Linwood school district for a fundraiser.

It’s not just money, either. The family has received videos of fellow amputees doing everything from driving a stick-shift car to playing golf.

“We’ve tried to send out thank-yous, but it’s almost impossible,” Humerickhouse said.

His baseball coach, Kevin Stewart, said Roberts is a full member of the team and participates in drills, practices and everything else. His good sense of humor keeps the team’s spirits high, he said.

Roberts said the only thing he can’t do is run. But he’s working on that, too. He’ll be going to Oklahoma this week to be fitted with a special prosthetic designed for running.

Still, hitting, fielding, throwing, pitching — he seems to have all that stuff down. Stewart said he’s just as coordinated and athletic as most of his teammates, even with a prosthetic.

“Going back, thinking about football, I mean, he was a great athlete then, but now you can really see how good of an athlete he is,” said Stewart, who also served as an assistant on the football team. “He’s hopping around on one leg, throwing people out, and he can pitch and do some other things. He’s a pretty special kid, and I definitely enjoyed coaching him.”

In the game in which he suffered his injury, Roberts had returned a kickoff for a touchdown, added two receiving touchdowns and had racked up 193 total yards — all in the first half.

Once he gets the prosthetic designed for running, Roberts said he’d like to try to participate on the high school track team.

Roberts and his guardians are still fighting an insurance company over a computerized knee, which would operate more smoothly than his current prosthetic. Still, his medical expenses have been nearly covered by the donations.

Now all that’s left is paying for college, Humerickhouse said, adding quickly that she didn’t think that was anybody else’s concern.

Roberts said he hopes to attend Kansas University next fall, though he still needs to take the ACT. He said he doesn’t yet know what he hopes to do with his life. He’s just taking it as it comes.

And what would he like to say to the people who helped him out?

“Just thanks,” he said. “I mean, they’ve been there since day one, and I still hear from them every now and again. It’s encouraging.”

Comments

christy kennedy 3 years, 8 months ago

Great kid! Seems like he'll do whatever he wants to do despite challenges. Best wishes to him and his family.

Bob Forer 3 years, 8 months ago

A tragic story with a good ending. This kid sounds like a real fighter. i wish him and his family the best.

rgh 3 years, 8 months ago

This is truly an amazing story. This same thing happened to a high school wrestler in Illinois and he has a great attitude as well. I wish both all the best.

Deja Coffin 3 years, 7 months ago

Trevor is awesome! I was leaving the track the other day sulking about my lack of running skills.... when I saw him and a friend shooting hoops and it made me realize that the thing I'm whining about is probably the one thing he would love to be able to do again. I will say that already it seems like he can do more on one leg without complaining then some of us can do on two legs. We're lucky to have such a great role model in our community.

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