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Opinion

Opinion

Special man

In many ways, Jim Seaver set a high standard for community and academic leadership.

March 18, 2011

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Kansas University has lost one of its academic giants with the death of Jim Seaver. He was the epitome of a university faculty member, quiet and highly respected. The longtime faculty member was a powerful force on and off the campus, not necessarily because he injected himself into contentious issues, but because he was held in such high regard by those genuinely interested in the betterment of the university and the community.

Seaver was the perfect example of the true renaissance man. He was a scholar in every respect with varied interests in Western civilization, history, architecture and music. He was a nationally known opera commentator and a frequent foreign traveler. He was a skilled and successful collegiate athlete and counseled and advised thousands of university students. He was a powerful, thoughtful and effective speaker, a superb bridge player and served as president of KU’s Faculty Senate. He was interested and knowledgeable about the political scene and … he was a very nice person.

Times, conditions and the environment change, but few KU faculty members have left such a mark on the university as did Jim Seaver. The university needs more faculty members and Lawrence needs more residents like Jim Seaver.

Comments

gilly 3 years, 9 months ago

Dr. Seaver taught my Western Civ II class, and for lecture he played a bit of of Machievelli's opera (vinyl on a phonograph player, that archaic technology!) for us to listen to. He was always gracious. I'm sad he is gone.

Bob Forer 3 years, 9 months ago

A true gentleman. Sad to see him gone. However, we can celebrate the fact that he lead a long and wonderful life, and was lucid and active until his demise. We should all be so fortunate.

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