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Archive for Saturday, June 18, 2011

Regional EPA administrator Karl Brooks eager to tackle Kansas’ challenges

June 18, 2011

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Karl Brooks, regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, acknowledged that his job is getting harder.

Eighteen months into his career at the regulatory agency, Brooks said he is eager to take on the global environmental challenges the country faces.

“It’s scary, but, frankly, it’s really exciting,” he said. “It’s a ride into a future that none of us were really anticipating and all of us are responsible for creating.”

Brooks, an environmental studies associate professor at Kansas University prior to joining the EPA, is responsible for EPA region 7, which includes the Missouri-Mississippi basin, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and nine tribal nations.

He spoke at the Lawrence Public Library, 707 Vt., on Saturday and answered questions from the audience. State Sen. Marci Francisco, D-Lawrence, and Douglas County Commissioner Nancy Thellman both attended.

Brooks said he wants to continue reducing water and air pollution and build a healthy relationship with the state’s large agriculture industry. He said one of the biggest challenges the agency faces is decreased funding.

“Clearly, state agencies have to do a lot of work with less funds than they had a year ago,” Brooks said.

Comments

Jimo 3 years, 6 months ago

Poor fellow. He's about to meet thousands of Kansas bubbleheads who have been brainwashed into believing that clean air is bad. Bad because it results from regulation. Bad because clean air costs jobs. Bad because if God wanted us to have clean air He'd have given it to us. Or some other similar nonsense.

American exceptionalism, at its worst.

Mike Ford 3 years, 6 months ago

snap keep burying your head in the sand. don't all of you do that?

Richard Heckler 3 years, 6 months ago

A mammoth confrontation is before us. Mother Nature trying to fend off Global Warming has become more than a 24/7 occupation.

In the last ice age there was not:

*a damaged ozone layer

*300 billion people

*billions of cars/trucks

*billions of homes

*millions of large downtown commercial/office structures

*tons of coal fired plants

*tons of nuke plants

*millions of manufacturing plants

*tons upon tons of toxic lawn/landscape chemicals spread upon millions upon millions upon millions of yards trying to create the un-natural yard

*a huge polluting USA government

*a quite large polluting oil industry that dos not give a damn

*a large unknown amount of depleted uranium weapons dust being spread around the world

*millions of americans who don't give a damn and believe what misinformed politicians tell them

Flap Doodle 3 years, 6 months ago

"...tons upon tons of toxic lawn/landscape chemicals spread upon millions upon millions upon millions of yards trying to create the un-natural yard" The lawn care industry has a lot to answer for. Doing away with the planet killing internal combustion lawn mowers would be a good first step.

Flap Doodle 3 years, 6 months ago

merrill, the mammoths are long gone, kinda like your relevance.

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