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Archive for Thursday, June 16, 2011

Statehouse Live: Regents approve Kansas University tuition increase

Kansas University Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little comments on the tuition increase approved Thursday by the Kansas Board of Regents.

June 16, 2011, 9:33 a.m. Updated June 16, 2011, 12:20 p.m.

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— The Kansas Board of Regents on Thursday approved $26 million in tuition and fee increases for public universities, including Kansas University, and several board members blamed the Legislature for decreasing its tax dollar commitment to higher education.

“I wish we didn’t have to do this,” said Christine Downey-Schmidt of Inman. “This is the option we have left until our partners come back and help us with this process.”

“Everything is going up except state funding. The question is who is going to pay for it,” said Dan Lykins of Topeka.

For now, the answer is students will have to pay more.

Starting this fall at KU, tuition and required fees will increase from $4,012 to $4,234, a $222 or 5.5 percent increase for an undergraduate taking 15 hours.

The tuition for a non-Kansas resident will increase from $9,504 to $10,179, a $675 increase or 7.1 percent. Graduate students will face a 5.5 percent increase for residents and 5.9 percent for non-residents.

Tuition and fees under the KU Compact — for first-time, degree-seeking freshmen — will increase from $4,366 to $4,611, or $245, which is a 5.6-percent increase. That cost will be fixed for four years. Nonresident students will see an increase from $10,769 to $11,304, or 5 percent.

Since the KU Compact has been in effect for several years, 65 percent of returning under-graduates will see no tuition increase, according to KU.

Students at KU Medical Center will see a 4.9 percent increase.

All the regents schools were granted increases. For a resident undergraduate, the tuition and fee increase at Kansas State will be 3.8 percent; Wichita State, 5.1 percent; Emporia State, 6.8 percent; Pittsburg State, 6.5 percent; and Fort Hays State, 3.6 percent.

Regents members said the tuition increases were needed to cover increased costs in utilities and employee health insurance, pay for increased mandates from the Legislature, and make up for continued budget cuts.

The budget signed into law by Gov. Sam Brownback allocates an estimated $744 million to higher education for the fiscal year that starts July 1. That is down from the $753 million for the current fiscal year. During the two years prior to that, higher education was cut by approximately $100 million as the state reeled from the recession.

Regent Jarold Boettcher of Manhattan said the tuition increases are tied to the decreasing state commitment to higher education. “It’s not an accident. It’s not a coincidence. It’s a fact,” he said.

KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little said the increases at KU were needed to make up for increasing costs, such as in health insurance and utilities, and also will be used to give raises to top faculty, increase the availability of high-demand classes, and for student retention support services.

She said private universities and public universities in faster growing states are trying to lure away faculty.

Additionally, about $400,000 of the increase will be added to the $10.3 million in need-based grants.

“We are going to continue to do everything we can to make sure students who want to come to KU, who can do college work, have an opportunity to do that,” she said.

Comments

tomatogrower 2 years, 10 months ago

More and more middle and low income students will be locked out of upward mobility, but will still be paying taxes for those upper income kids to go to college and get a job they probably would have gotten anyway, because Daddy or Mommy has the right connections.

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yourworstnightmare 2 years, 10 months ago

I have argued for a long time that KU should become a private university.

KU receives about ~25% of its expenditures from the state, the other coming from tuition (~25%), research grants (~25%),and other sources (~25%).

A doubling of tuition would make up the difference right away, and would still make KU a competitive price relative to other state universities and a bargain compared to other private universities.

Then, the state could start paying KU for the "services" it now receives, such as law enforcement training.

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George Lippencott 2 years, 10 months ago

You know there is anothere way to reduce tuition- cut services.

The University argues that the demand is there. If it is in fact the students making these demands then the students should pay - not the retired farmwife.

Frankly, the state should consider focusing the state contribution on credentials that benefit the state - those paying for them. In fact, is that not what our governor has done with the initiative on engineering??

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bobberboy 2 years, 10 months ago

they say browncrack increased funding for his buddies at k-state.

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kusadgirl 2 years, 10 months ago

I can't believe I chose KU over CU.

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scarletbhound 2 years, 10 months ago

I am tired of KU officials claiming that other universities are trying to lure away faculty. I want specifics. I want names of the targeted professors. While I have no doubt that a few high flyers -- those with huge research contracts -- are attractive to other schools, I sincerely question that it's a widepsread problem in most departments. I keep up to date with higher education and I know of no state that is not experiencing severe financial stress -- just look at California, New York, Illinois etc., all of whom are making deep cuts in colleges. The fact is that KU and other schools are going to have to do more, do it better and do it with less money. If the current chancellor refuses to accept that obviously difficult challenge, she should consider a different career, because such is the reality in higher education for at least the next decade.

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yourworstnightmare 2 years, 10 months ago

Methinks Ashford might be acting as a representative of Ashworth College on this site, furthering its commercial interests. This is a no-no.

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ashford 2 years, 10 months ago

The question mark (?), not a big deal.

Would Kansas University guarantee quality education for students which students are paying for, and would they guarantee jobs after graduation for paying all the high tuition fees?

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ashford 2 years, 10 months ago

Would Kansas University guarantee quality education for students which students are paying for, and would they guarantee jobs after graduation for paying all the high tuition fees. I suggest that students should study online at Ashworth College and pay 50% less and still get quality education at their own pace without the pompt and pagentry of KU hype and astronomical cost for college without anything to show for it.

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thepianoman 2 years, 10 months ago

Good god. I just Can't fathom the cost of college these days. I graduated Washburn in 2005, so I started in 2000.

How in the %$# do people afford this???? I just don't get it. 4200 pers semester???? It's just jaw-dropping.....

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booyalab 2 years, 10 months ago

Once again college tuition increases much faster than general inflation.

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Kim Murphree 2 years, 10 months ago

Interesting...the reason we started public universities was to guarantee all high school graduates in Kansas a college education...how far we have come from that....not may kids in Kansas will be able to afford a college education at Kansas University any more. What a shame for our kids. now the University exists to promote itself.

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consumer1 2 years, 10 months ago

Big deal when have the ever not approved a tuition increase?

" demand from students to continue to improve the university."

Like what? What improvements???? Name some improvements the students are demanding.

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consumer1 2 years, 10 months ago

Big deal when have the ever not approved a tuition increase?

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consumer1 2 years, 10 months ago

Big deal when have the ever not approved a tuition increase?

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