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Archive for Monday, July 18, 2011

Courtroom full of police and detectives sees 21-year-old man sentenced for injuring Lawrence officer

July 18, 2011

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A Douglas County judge Monday sentenced a 21-year-old Lawrence man to serve more than five years in prison for injuring a Lawrence police officer in a February incident.

District Judge Kay Huff ordered the sentence for Louis G. Galloway Jr. in front of a packed courtroom full of about 30 Lawrence police officers and detectives.

“The court will sentence Mr. Galloway to the aggravated sentence of 69 months in light of the permanent injury to Officer (Jonathon) Evinger,” Huff said.

A jury in May convicted Galloway of punching and injuring Evinger in a Feb. 26 confrontation near 26th and Iowa streets. According to testimony at the two-day trial, Evinger and another officer, Stephen Ramsdell, were trying to arrest Galloway for driving on a suspended license. Galloway disputed that he was driving.

Evinger said in court that he has internal eye injuries that will never allow him to patrol again at night.

“This is an injury that greatly affects my career and everyday life outside of work,” Evinger said.

During a lengthy statement from Galloway that his defense attorney Michael Clarke read, the defendant briefly apologized to Evinger and his own family but also accused officers of profiling him because his father, Louis Galloway Sr., is in prison.

“I'm going to dislike the law even more and throw my life away easily,” Galloway Jr. said. “You can't put me in prison and expect a better person.”

Clarke asked Huff to sentence Galloway to serve a maximum 62 months in prison, and Clarke said Galloway could get treatment in prison for anger management and other issues.

But prosecutors had sought the 69-month sentence plus an additional three years in jail on three misdemeanor convictions related to the incident.

“He's here, if you would believe him, for every reason except for his own actions,” said David Melton, a chief assistant district attorney. “And that’s exactly why he's here, your honor. He's here because on the night in question he turned what should have been a minor, run-of-the-mill traffic stop into an incident where Officer Evinger was seriously injured.”

Huff did allow Galloway to serve his time for the misdemeanors while he was serving his prison sentence.

Comments

purplesage 2 years, 9 months ago

Police do not hold one another to the same standards that the general public obeys. A simple example is the matter of showing a badge if stopped for speeding.

That said, this is intimidation. The guns, badges, uniforms and the militarization of police make the presence of a large number intimidating - and they know it. This is more than a show of support. It is the "us against them" part of the police personality showing its public face.

The police officer was injured and bears the marks of the encounter with this man. But against whom did he commit a crime? On one level, against the individual who was injured; on another, he committed the crime against the society in the larger context. And it all started over a confrontation about who was driving a vehicle? Pretty high price to pay by all concerned.

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tanaumaga 2 years, 9 months ago

Crazy Larry, go back to your fireworks stand and remain quiet until next year please.

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sierraclub 2 years, 9 months ago

LOL, only in Lawrence can a murderer get probation and a person who hits an officer gets 5 years in jail!!! LOL And I always thought that murder was worse!! LOL

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mutualrespect37 2 years, 9 months ago

Ever notice the wingnuts who post on LJWorld threads are the first ones to attack others with trumped up(and patently false, bullying and cruel) mental health insults? Those "go take your meds" -- "You're crazy if you see things differently"--lines sure get old. Typically, especially in the twisted badlands of places like Douglas County and Lawrence, the guilty ones are the first ones to point fingers of blame. That's what makes law enforcement people so scary here. They're in cahoots with the town crooks in power and the wrong side of history. It takes a kook to know one. Lawrence people are even more charming in person than they are online. Seeing them though, it does surprise me that many here even can type.

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UNIKU 2 years, 9 months ago

Aaaaaannnd it returns....with another paranoid rant

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smitty 2 years, 9 months ago

pitbullgrandma, ex-LE, your karma ran over your dogma, Stop the arrogance and BS that you are better than the general public...you are complicit with the corruption by turning a deaf ear and a blind eye to your peers actions...as are your peers

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mutualrespect37 2 years, 9 months ago

It's sad this officer got hurt and I certainly don't condone violence, but in general the pack mentality of cops and their blue code of silence leads to double standards. It's ironic that the law is enforced by people who show such blatant disrespect for the truth and decent honesty. Police are allowed to lie to people they are questioning and do so all the time. Too often the goal becomes meeting arrest quotas and convicting people of crimes they are innocent of even to the point of relying on factual misrepresentations and tampered evidence.

I despise the authoritarian, punitive mentality that is the watchword of many in law enforcement. Ignorance and an authoritarian attitude can form a toxic cocktail. Things have gotten much worse since 9/11, and in places like Kansas "the suspects classes" bear the brunt of police brutality and misconduct. It's undignified that these officers are so hungry for vengeance they would all pile into to a courtroom to watch the hateful and incompetent local criminal injustice system at work--eye for an eye sentencing at its most unconscionable. Boo for the prison-industrial complex!

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smitty 2 years, 9 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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Paula Kissinger 2 years, 9 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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verity 2 years, 9 months ago

Not smart to resist arrest. Not smart to hit a police officer. Pretty simple really. Not a fight you're going to win.

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BlackVelvet 2 years, 9 months ago

Smitty must be on vacation. Oh wait, I said something to/about smitty. This post will now be deleted. ouch!

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jayarch 2 years, 9 months ago

why is it that child molesters get lesser sentences than this?

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akt2 2 years, 9 months ago

Just wondering what this guy has to offer society. And what he's done that he wasn't caught for. Add it all up and prison is the only outcome. Better sooner than later. Less chance of innocent people being caught up in his criminal behavior.

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monkeywrench1969 2 years, 9 months ago

After being shot and surviving why wouldn't someone take that as an omen to make your life right.

After reading some of these comments about how they cops are so evil, why shouldn't they back each other...it is easy to get jaded no one is going to back your from some of the posters here...blaming them for bad cops in other cities. The cops I know and live near are like everyone else except they step up and try and protect others. Why shouldn't they show support for their own.

As far as showing support in court they got ragged on for showing support to civilians too.

They can never win

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HollisBrown 2 years, 9 months ago

Giving my 9 year old niece a piggyback ride does not constitute child molestation. Oh, wait. It's 2011. I deny that ever happened. She only gets a wave and a smile. No physical contact whatsoever.

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Multidisciplinary 2 years, 9 months ago

Hollis, now you're calling us nosey hicks because we know how to look on the KDOC?

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HollisBrown 2 years, 9 months ago

KDOC, the Website for Nosey Hicks. The same folks who sit around listening to their police scanners all night. Oh, BTW, I haven't gotten around to beating my wife yet, but I know of a cop who did. He served a long suspension, but got to keep his job, thanks to the Union. Oh and hey, do you like a 40 hour work week with weekends or at least a day or 2 off? Do you you like paid holidays, health benefits, etc. Shake the hand of the next Union man you meet.

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Benthic 2 years, 9 months ago

Sad to hear an officer sustained a permanent injury during the line of duty. They are the ones who risk their personal safety in keeping the rest of us safe.

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ferrislives 2 years, 9 months ago

Yeah, Mr. Galloway is a good person alright: http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2009/nov...

And don't even get me started on dear old dad. Just look him up; he has the same name. The apple obviously didn't fall far from this tree!

Stop your bellyaching, and be glad that a repeat offender with not much of a future is in prison. Who knows what he'll do next time.

Remember, these are his own words:

"I'm going to dislike the law even more and throw my life way easily,” Galloway Jr. said. “You can't put me in prison and expect a better person.".

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RoeDapple 2 years, 9 months ago

69 months isn't so bad for a repeat offender, still think the same cops should be there when he gets released. Hey, if Casey gets a police escort out of jail . . .

Hey Hollis I got your back! Let's rock 'n roll outa this joint!

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HollisBrown 2 years, 9 months ago

The Unfriendeding has started, as expected. Begin the Beguine. Oh, and just a word about cop cams. They are the property of the police department. Have you ever seen what happens when a citizen legally records an arrest? All of a sudden you end up with piles of parking tickets on your car and getting pulled over for a broken wiper blade. Just recently some guy filmed some cops busting a couple of kids. He was immediately ticketed for jaywalking, which was then bumped up to disorderly conduct. I will say that he was also charged with possession of a very small amount of weed, but, even if true, there is often a huge diference between legal and illegal and right and wrong. On still another hand, the 1992 riots in L.A. turned out to be more about how much booze and TV's people could loot than it was about Rod King.

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HollisBrown 2 years, 9 months ago

I don't hate cops. You couldn't pay me enough to do that job. Yep, I've had a couple of DUI's, but it sure as hell wasn't a cop's fault, it was mine. Cops always get blamed for doing their job. In each case I made contact with the arresting officer after I sobered up and apologozed for the trouble and for being a jerk, if I was. Both times the officer was extremely polite and assured me that I wasn't a jerk and even asked how I was doing. I have no sympathy for dirt bags that assault cops. Plus, it isn't very bright, that and trying to run away. This person seems to have no accountabilty for his actions and will most likely be a lifelong offender. The point I was making is that the guy was convicted and was to be sentenced. I'm sure his friends and co-workers have stood by his side since the incident and will continue to do so, the mark of true friends. But I still think it was inappropriate and embarrasing to have a courtroom full of cops at the sentencing. Gang up on me all you want, I'm used to it.

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jweishaar89 2 years, 9 months ago

Wow....And Casey Anthony got away with murder, but 69 months for this? Ridiculous. Sending youth to prison is a great way of creating harder criminals when they are released. Way to go Justice system!

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Multidisciplinary 2 years, 9 months ago

wtfusa (anonymous) says… Cops are good, and cops are bad. It's because they are imperfect people.

On that same note, Galloways are good (needs references, I know, I know), and Galloways are bad.......

Just how many Galloways from DgCo are there on that KDOC list. Two, could get out next year. I wonder if jr's choises have anything to do with the others in lock up, or with histories?

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DRsmith 2 years, 9 months ago

Wow, dunkin donuts must have been a ghost town.

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wtfusa 2 years, 9 months ago

Cops are good, and cops are bad. It's because they are imperfect people. However, being a cop puts a overwhelming amount of power into one's hands. That is why we need to hold cops to the HIGHEST standards of law, and currently the exact opposite is true. The Blue Code exists and it is wrong, it is not what our nation is about.

but in this case everything seems to go as it should. Maybe think about the boy's point that a prison is no place to rehabilitate someone to be fit for society, I'd vote for giving this kid specialized community service, like 1000 hours helping guide the blind.

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Linda Endicott 2 years, 9 months ago

Just as a matter of curiosity...

Would this kid have gotten the same sentence if he'd hit anyone else, and not a cop?

And was it proven in court that he hit the cop with the intent of permanently injuring his eye?

Shouldn't intent have something to do with the sentence?

I've known guys that were hit in the eye (you probably have, too)...and it didn't result in a permanent injury...sometimes that's just the luck of the draw...strange things happen sometimes...doesn't mean that the kid intended to hurt him that way...

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consumer1 2 years, 9 months ago

jackbinkelman, The falling through the crack escape clause is so yesterday and overused. At some point a person must take responsibility for their own actions. The guy has a perfect role model for what not to do. He made the choice to behave like an idiot because of enabler's such as yourself.

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RoeDapple 2 years, 9 months ago

Now if the same cops were lined up outside the gate when he is released . . .

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jackbinkelman 2 years, 9 months ago

Seems like this kid has fallen through the cracks his entire life. This is the outcome.. Get involved.

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Multidisciplinary 2 years, 9 months ago

Careful there Hollis, statements like that, you never know, ..the unfriendededing may commence.

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topflight 2 years, 9 months ago

Oh my goodness? HollisBrown is so delusional it hurts. You feel sorry for a guy who punched a police officer? Really? I would also like to know why you were in the courtroom when the officer was getting charged? Oh wait, you hate cops, that's right. What happened? Get in a little trouble did we? I am betting you smacked you wife around or something. Just a guess though. Or maybe this is something someone told your friend that told their friend that told you. No facts. And to be completely honest, I feel the exact opposite is true. If a cops gets a DUI, I think it is even harder for them to be found innocent just because they are a cop. A guilty cop should be spanked just like everyone else. Additionally, what does a cop getting a DUI have to do with a cop getting punched in the face? NOTHING.

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HollisBrown 2 years, 9 months ago

"Law enforcement officers are a tight-knit brotherhood"

True. It's called the Blue Code. It's been working well forever in New Orleans, especially during and since the hurricane.

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HollisBrown 2 years, 9 months ago

Reminds me of a case years ago where a cop who'd gotten a blatant DUI went to court to save his neck and his job. Same scenario, courtroom filled with fellow officers. When he was pronounced not guilty, some hick stood up, slapped his holster hard and hooted out "Not guilty!!". Rubes. And you'll never see a cop get a DUI in the county where he works, unless it unvolvoes a fatality accident.

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HollisBrown 2 years, 9 months ago

I seriously feel for the guy, but I think the police presence in the courtroom was gratuitous and down right rube-ish. Harkens back to Macon County Line and Sugerland Express. This state, even Lawrence, earns a lot of the hick stereoptypes it gets.

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Forever 2 years, 9 months ago

Kansasredleg I know this officer and family. He WAS an outstanding officer. Shame on you for putting down fellow employees who took there time out to support a fellow officer who by the way put his life on the line to protect and serve our community.(That would include protecting you). Just so you know this officers career is now over. He will no longer be able to serve and protect you.

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Richard Payton 2 years, 9 months ago

Jr and Sr will not be in the same prison will they?

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moot 2 years, 9 months ago

30 police officers showed up at his sentencing! Talk about intimidation.

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bootlegger 2 years, 9 months ago

Dont care if does not become a better person; he will do the time; and when he gets out; if he screws up again; he will do more time............just that simple.........so profile this.....

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ksjayhawk74 2 years, 9 months ago

“You can't put me in prison and expect a better person.”

Tip: Don't tell the parole board that.

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UNIKU 2 years, 9 months ago

A Smitty rant is imminent....brace for it...

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kansasredlegs 2 years, 9 months ago

While the hearing is certainly open to the public and I applaud anyone who takes an interest to show up, the disturbing thing here is that Chief Khatib went to the City Commission to request 5 more police officers due to shortage of personnel for "our safety" but here we have 30+ officers taking the time from protecting the community for their own self interests. Be interesting to learn whether the 30 officers and detectives drove their own vehicles or caught a taxpayer ride in their patrol cars and detective undercover cars.

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Adrienne Sanders 2 years, 9 months ago

"“You can't put me in prison and expect a better person.”"

He's right about that, though.

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Flap Doodle 2 years, 9 months ago

The miscreant will still be in his 20s when he gets out. Plenty of time to re-offend and get another, perhaps longer, trip to the Crossbar Hotel on the public's dime.

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faceit 2 years, 9 months ago

Shame on the police to show up and try to intimidate a new judge. Huff is still struggling to get comfortable (she's not a natural at this and honestly is not a good fit as a judge) with court room leadership. She struggles with details and procedures on a daily basis. Seems she is always playing catch-up.
Obviously, Galloway has not accepted responsibility for his actions, so I do agree with the sentence.

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consumer1 2 years, 9 months ago

The mindset the Galloway's have for authority is 100% hateful. Jr. trying to say he was being profiled because of his father is just wrong. This family is the author of their own problems.

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