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Archive for Thursday, January 6, 2011

Public officials warn against snorting bath salts to get high

January 6, 2011

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Bath Salts

  • Bath salts are legal, commercially available substances that contain a synthetic chemical, Methylene Dioxy Pyrovalerone, or MDPV.
  • When ingested, MDPV mimics the effects of amphetamines, and can produce a hallucinogenic high similar to ecstasy.
  • Brand names for the product include Cloud Nine, Red Dove, Vanilla Sky, Lunar Wave, Ivory Wave and Hurricane Charlie.
  • Negative effects reported include psychosis, self-harm, intense cravings, increased heart rate, as well as a potential for causing seizures and cardiac arrest.
  • The products can be purchased at stores or online, and costs about $50 for a 500 milligram supply.
  • If someone experiences negative effects after ingesting bath salts, officials suggest calling 911. For more information on bath salts, contact the Kansas Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222, or visit www.aapcc.org.

Last year Kansas and Missouri banned the synthetic marijuana-like substance K2 as the once-legal product gained popularity in the region. Manufacturers responded with altered versions such as K3.

Now public health officials are warning about the latest legal way to get high: snorting bath salts.

Salina police issued a warning about the practice following the death of a Kansas University student who was struck by a vehicle after running into traffic. Police found bath salts containing methylenedioxypyrovalerone, or MDPV, in the student’s possession and are awaiting toxicology results on whether he had ingested the substance prior to the incident.

Health officials report that the substance can cause delusions and confusion, in addition to increased heart rate and potentially seizures or cardiac arrest.

In 2010, family and friends of a Cameron, Mo., man who committed suicide attributed his death to an addiction to bath salts.

The active substance in the bath salts — which go by brand names such as Cloud Nine, Ocean Snow and Lunar Wave — is amphetamine-like and mimics the effects of ecstasy, said KU medicinal chemistry professor Tom Prisinzano.

“They’re basically just amphetamine derivatives,” he said.

Prisinzano said a legal chemical is applied to the bath salts in a similar way to how synthetic cannaboids were sprayed on herbal mixtures to make products like K2.

It amounts to a creative way to make legal versions of illegal drugs, he said.

“They’re getting around the drug laws,” Prisinzano said, adding concerns about what may actually be in the bath salts. “There’s no quality assurance.”

American Association of Poison Control Centers reported that the bath salts are crushed up and snorted, and even injected in at least one case.

Reports of bath salt ingestion are popping up around the country. Jessica Wehrman, a spokeswoman for the AAPCC, said poison control centers in the United States reported 232 calls about bath salts in 2010. Through Thursday, Wehrman said centers had already received 50 calls about bath salts in 2011.

A spokesman for the Kansas Poison Control Center said they have not received any calls about bath salts. But Julie Weber, director of the Missouri Poison Center, said that the center received eight calls about bath salts in 2010 and already five calls in 2011.

The AAPCC release came with stern warnings about not ingesting bath salts, which are labeled “not for human consumption.”

“This is an emerging health threat that needs to be taken seriously,” said Alvin C. Bronstein, medical director of the Rocky Mountain Poison Control Centers.

Law enforcement officials say they haven’t yet seen bath salts pop up in Lawrence.

“We are aware of it and know that it could affect us in the future,” said Sgt. Matt Sarna of the Lawrence Police Department.

It’s unclear whether the product is sold at any Lawrence-area stores, but reports have indicated that the product is widely available in the Kansas City area and can also be purchased online.

Comments

Starlight 3 years, 3 months ago

Our niece's two year old visited last weekend and was having great fun spinning around in circles till she fell down. Probably more fun when you're less than three feet from the floor to begin with.

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Kris_H 3 years, 3 months ago

What? If you want "delusions and confusion", just watch Glen Beck for more than five minutes.

The best natural high is still sex. :)

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CorkyHundley 3 years, 3 months ago

The "Conscience of Kansas" is at it again.

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PleaseStopPPL 3 years, 3 months ago

Whens this gonna stop? this system is so screwed up that it's just a vicious cycle that will never end! this is whats gonna happen, not what i THINKS gonna happen. this "drug" is gonna get too much attention by awsome reporters like this who describe it as "LEGAL high" this report wont warn nobody just make more curiosity out there, which will then result in more use then more deaths and damage, then to a nation wide ban, and then were moving on to the next legal way for it to start all over. First of all to the reporter BAD RESEARCH! they're not really bath salts, thats what they have to be sold as for thats the use this stuff was cleared for sale (the loophole in the legal sale of this) that and the wonderful fda clearing the chem MDPV but anyways i have LOTS to say about this so if your really concerned or you wanna know more about this please don't hesitate to e-mail me at guynextdoor746@AIM.com for i have done my research on this fully with no shortcuts or taking peoples word on it. just please try not to post or comment or put anything on the web about this stuff being a drug or legal high or anything that will intice people more because people looking to get high dont look at the horrible things it does they just see "wow i can go to the gas station and get a legal jar of meth"...by the way i'm not from around here not sure what newspaper im posting in just catching the poor reporting about this(which is everywhere) and trying to make it right!

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Scott Kaiser 3 years, 3 months ago

Snorting bath salts? Goodness, what's next? Licking toads?

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MacHeath 3 years, 3 months ago

Heck, there are those that get high and die huffing gas and paint. You can make that illegal. BTW...I knew a girl....years ago...that snorted some comet my mistake. LOL

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Kontum1972 3 years, 3 months ago

mountain lion droppings will give ya a buzz too

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Kontum1972 3 years, 3 months ago

try Comet...those blue crystals will pulverize ya!

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ranger7272 3 years, 3 months ago

I love bath salts!! In my bath.....

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somedude20 3 years, 3 months ago

I am just going to throw this out there, do not drink radiator fluid for a high as it does not work and leaves you with green vomit and it aint easy being green yuns guys

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northtown 3 years, 3 months ago

What does bathsalts do when you use it in your bath???

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OldEnuf2BYurDad 3 years, 3 months ago

I really need to work on my reading comprehension. I just went through a whole bag of driveway ice-melt.

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CloveK 3 years, 3 months ago

This is getting ridiculous. For the love of God can we just legalize pot? Tax it, control it, yadi yadi yadi... it has all been said before. People are not going to stop trying to find ways to beat the system. It is a fact of life.

I would much rather people be using a regulated substance for recreational purpose than trying out the next new concoction that will get them high and not show up on a drug test.

There is no logic in the legislation, only BS politics and money.

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pizzapete 3 years, 3 months ago

One more reason to legalize the weed?

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grimpeur 3 years, 3 months ago

Effervescence, indeed!

Also, 'nother news flash for ya: glowing ember enemas, while fashionable nowadays, are not as cleansing as they sound.

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dumbkansans 3 years, 3 months ago

doing bumps of this stuff as i type. got a few rails lined up for later tonight!

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milkman_dan 3 years, 3 months ago

I tried bath salts once. Lawrence Welk would have been jealous of my colonic effervescence.

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greenworld 3 years, 3 months ago

i thought sex was like getting high isnt it?? And isnt it safe??

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CorkyHundley 3 years, 3 months ago

The "Conscience of Kansas" is all over this.

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 3 months ago

Sounds like a self-correcting problem.

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ronwell_dobbs 3 years, 3 months ago

Didn't Darwin weigh in on this several centuries ago?

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Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 3 months ago

This is going to do wonders for the sales of bath salts. Just like K2, it was something that very few people had even heard of until they read about it here.

Free advertising in the newspaper. Was it on the front page of the print edition?

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Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 3 months ago

I think you can get a buzz from drinking beer, I wonder how much longer beer will be legal.

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Fossick 3 years, 3 months ago

I'd like to warn against smelling my finger to get high. Not only does it not work, it smells.

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greenworld 3 years, 3 months ago

I wonder what K3 is?? I heard of K2 but good lord this all is becoming very mind boggling and making me paranoid. I better stop talking about it. So i wonder what will happen when the number gets up to K9 , is that when you sit around and get your dog high??

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edjayhawk 3 years, 3 months ago

Ban gasoline because you can get high snorting that.

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dncinnanc 3 years, 3 months ago

Whatever happened to just letting Darwinism do its thing... snorting bath salts?? Really??

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thebcman 3 years, 3 months ago

I hear you can get high by being satisfied with who you are.

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candyapplered 3 years, 3 months ago

I hear you can get high smoking spanish peanut shells and banana peels.

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Erin Graham 3 years, 3 months ago

Yes, it's a problem.. but people are always going to find a way to get their kick, if that's what they choose to do. Let's ban nutmeg, too while we're at it!

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