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Archive for Monday, February 28, 2011

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Remnant Rehab: Felt board kid-tested, mother-approved

February 28, 2011

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It’s been a long, cold winter. Parents can make this quick, easy, no-sew felt board for kids who may be getting restless.

I remember playing with a felt board like this when I was young, but I wanted to find out whether it would still entertain kids today, who have so many electronic distractions. I borrowed my friends’ 5-year-old daughter for testing purposes. She took to it immediately and illustrated many Disney stories for us, including “Aladdin,” “Cinderella,” “The Little Mermaid” and another story we were not familiar with, “Jasmine’s First Wedding.” (We didn’t get to the stories about any subsequent weddings.)

Tabitha Metts, 5, daughter of Christian and Ann Metts, Lawrence, tries out a felt board created by Katie Kritikos. This is an easy and cheap project to put together before spring break.

Tabitha Metts, 5, daughter of Christian and Ann Metts, Lawrence, tries out a felt board created by Katie Kritikos. This is an easy and cheap project to put together before spring break.

In the end, I asked her how she liked it. “Good,” she said. “I love it.”

Supplies:

• Small corkboard — I picked up mine for a couple bucks at Lawrence Antique Mall, 830 Mass.

• Felt — one piece large enough to cover your corkboard

• Scissors

• Stapler and staples

• Ribbon

• Glue gun and glue

Instructions:

  1. Measure the size of felt needed to cover the corkboard and cut it out.

  2. Staple the felt onto the corkboard.

  3. Cut ribbons to fit along each edge of the felt. You will glue it on to cover up the staples. For me, it worked best to spread a little section of glue and then press the ribbon down. If you don’t have a glue gun, fabric glue or regular glue may work, too.

  4. Cut shapes from other pieces of felt. The number, size and shapes are up to you. One friend recommended I cut out animals, but I can’t draw well, so I stuck with a variety of shapes. My tester requested some small pieces for eyes and noses, and also Ariel’s hair.

That’s all there is to it. More shapes can be added or altered as needed, and it provides young kids plenty of opportunity to use their imagination.

— Copy editor Katie Kritikos can be reached at kkritikos@ljworld.com.

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