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Archive for Saturday, February 12, 2011

House committee OKs closing of Kansas center for disabled

February 12, 2011

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— A Kansas House committee has approved a proposal from Gov. Sam Brownback to close a center for the profoundly disabled and move the residents to community-based living areas.

Brownback says closing the Kansas Neurological Institute in Topeka and moving its 156 residents over the next two years would save the state about $659,000.

While approving the closing on Tuesday, members of the House Social Services Budget Committee recommended that appropriate funding follow individuals to provide services to them in their new residences.

The committee also recommended that the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services form a committee to develop a plan to move the residents.

Comments

Kathy46 3 years, 2 months ago

I am disgusted by the arrogance and ignorance of our state leaders for even considering such a thing as closing KNI. Why is it that the weakest among us always seem to be the most expendable? It always comes down to money, doesn't it? Hookers aren't the only ones who do it for the money. Kansas has had a proud history of its exceptional care given to the developmentally disabled. Please don't sacrifice the well-being of these people. There are no community agencies with the access to immediate medical care for these people who are also so medically fragile. Can you imagine their confusion and anxiety upon being torn from the only "family" they understand, taken to an unfamiliar, less professional environment and left to be at risk for any emergency that a community home was never designed for in the first place? NOTE TO LAW PROFESSORS AND/OR LAW STUDENTS: Would you consider taking on the state as an adversary to halt this process? I'm sure that the Kansas Statutes may have some provisons for stopping this. Perhaps the federal Americans with Disabilities Act might be applied here as well? I know of many people who would be more than willing to assist you in this endeavor. I hope someone will answer here.

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Bob Forer 3 years, 2 months ago

While I doubt that all the money saved by closing the hospital will "follow" those patients to the community, even if it does, I doubt they will receive the same high level of care that they do at KNI. Its simply an economy of scale.

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Ken Lassman 3 years, 2 months ago

First of all, there are no community facilities to take these folks--even if they are moved to Parsons, they will have to spend big bucks to upgrade since it's not wheelchair accessible.

Secondly, the wages paid in the community are around 8:50/hour plus $3 in benefits. KNI pays $12.50/hour plus $7 in benefits. In other words, the savings will be made on the wages of folks doing the hard work of supporting these folks. Annual staff turnover at KNI is around 15 percent; in the community it's over 50 percent. Becoming a CMA at KNI is mandatory due to the complexity of the supports; and KNI pays for this training. Not true in the community.

By the way, I got this information from a handout that was given to the Ways and Means Committee, so they know what they are doing. Closing KNI is lowering the level of supports for these folks big time, and you can be assured that morbidity and mortiality rates will skyrocket. Brownback and his administration know that these folks won't get anywhere near the same level of care, despite assuring Kansans in his State of the State speech that he will look after the most vulnerable and needy. You don't get any more vulnerable and needy than these folks, Sam.

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weeslicket 3 years, 2 months ago

"While approving the closing on Tuesday, members of the House Social Services Budget Committee recommended that appropriate funding follow individuals to provide services to them in their new residences." Read: you will get nothing. you are on your own. (maybe they meant "equitable". certainly not "suitable".)

why do christian republicans hate people so much?

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