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Archive for Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Kansas jobless rate down slightly in November

December 20, 2011

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— Unemployment was down slightly in Kansas in November to a seasonally adjusted rate of 6.5 percent, down from 6.7 percent in October and 6.9 percent in November 2010.

The Kansas Department of Labor report released Tuesday said the economy showed some signs of improvement, adding 5,000 new nonfarm jobs over the past month. The state also gained 4,500 private sector jobs in November.

Labor Secretary Karin Brownlee described the unemployment figures and work force increases as "positive news."

Labor Department economist Tyler Tenbrink said in a statement that more than 15,000 people joined the Kansas work force in the last three months, although some of the jobs are seasonal.

Comments

deec 3 years ago

Temporary seasonal retail hiring.

George_Braziller 3 years ago

Don't forget the block of people for the month who still don't have a job but also had their unemployment benefits end. They statistically no longer exist.

jhawkinsf 3 years ago

So do we blame Obama and give credit to Brownback or blame Obama and give credit to Brownback?

jhawkinsf 3 years ago

Whoops, messed that up, didn't I.

Armstrong 3 years ago

You are obviously very bright and insightful. Your above post is right on the mark. Excellent job

pavlovs_dog 3 years ago

Kochs hired some guys to put up Christmas lights on their vacation homes.

Tracy Rogers 3 years ago

I'll bet there isn't a November in history that unemployment numbers haven't decreased.

tolawdjk 3 years ago

Ask and you shall recieve.

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LASST20000003

Oct to Nov,

2001 - increase 2002 - flat 2003 - flat 2004 - flat 2005 - decrease 2006 - decrease 2007 - flat 2008 - increase 2009 - flat 2010 - flat 2011 - decrease

So, concerned1, you are wrong.

Further, its rather disgusting that when there is something as easy to obtain as this data that people immediate jump into their respective camps rather than investigating it themselves. Futher, the data is seasonally adjusted, so it removes the holiday swings, agriculture and other regional jobs issues and tries to get at the core of job creation and employment.

A little education can be a dangerous thing. Thankfully no one has ever claimed the general population is educated.

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