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Archive for Monday, December 5, 2011

Leavenworth Penitentiary distributes nearly 200,000 lbs. of prisoner-grown produce

December 5, 2011

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— Produce grown by inmates at the U.S. Penitentiary in Leavenworth helped more than 21,000 people this year.

Brian Habjan, a spokesman for the program, says 198,778 pounds of produce was given away free of charge this year.

The program started in 2010. The inmates grow the produce and volunteers pick it up for distribution around the Leavenworth area.

Habjan says 21,823 people received the produce this year. He says an average of 334 families and 839 individuals received the fruits and vegetables each week.

The Leavenworth Times reports that some inmates in the program receive apprenticeship program credits through the Department of Labor that can be converted into college credits.

Comments

justfoodks 2 years, 4 months ago

math,

We certainly take donations of all kinds: food & money! You can bring the deer meat by our warehouse at 1200 E. 11th Street and we'll be happy to take it off your hands. We'll weigh it and give you a donation receipt. Thanks for your support of our program. We have provided more than a half million meals for Douglas County residents. If you have questions, call me. 785.856.7030.

Sincerely, Jeremy

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irvan moore 2 years, 4 months ago

my cousin worked on that farm while he was there, the interesting thing was that he was in there for growing produce to distribute

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justfoodks 2 years, 4 months ago

1southernjayhawk,

It is happening. We received several shipments from Leavenworth that we distributed here in Douglas County to the more than 2,500 clients we serve through our food pantry. This fresh produce was also made available to our 20+ partner agencies (including Ballard Center, Salvation Army, Trinity Interfaith Food Pantry, Willow Domestic Violence Center, and various other churches and agencies) at no cost.

If you have any questions, I would love to talk to you about it!

Sincerely, Jeremy Farmer Executive Director, Just Food 785.856.7030 jfarmer@eckan.org

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1southernjayhawk 2 years, 4 months ago

I really like this idea that the felons are learning a trade and doing something productive while poor people are getting good quality, locally grown food. I hope this is what is actually happening.

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Clark Coan 2 years, 4 months ago

At least they'll have a skill when they get out. Farm work is one of the few jobs they could get with a felony record.

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kawrivercrow 2 years, 4 months ago

Why can't the consumer pay market value for the produce?

How are produce growers in the private sector supposed to compete with a subsidized workforce and operations site

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