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Archive for Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Temperatures hit 111 degrees in Lawrence, just shy of all-time record

August 2, 2011

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Temperatures in Lawrence have risen to 111 degrees — a mere three degrees below Lawrence's all-time high of 114 degrees. The mercury hit its apex at 2:52 p.m., on a day when the temperature was already 84 degrees shortly before 8 a.m.

However, because of the dry air — drier than what the region has had lately, anyway — temperatures outside felt like a brisk 110 degrees.

An excessive heat warning from the National Weather Service continues through Wednesday evening, and highs are expected to be between 95-110 degrees Wednesday.

The record heat has been blamed for a number of heat illnesses in the area. Kansas Department of Health and Environment spokeswoman Miranda Myrick said Tuesday that Kansas hospitals have reported more than 400 people have gone to their hospitals with heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion. KDHE also says that the heat has contributed to the deaths of 3 Kansans so far this summer. Belinda Rehmer, an Lawrence Memorial Hospital spokeswoman, said the hospital saw 31 patients in July because of heat-related issues, and six of them had to be admitted for observation.

The heat wave gripping Kansas also has taken a toll on animals.

The manager of a Great Bend operation that picks up dead cattle from feed yards and ranches says he may run seven days a week to keep up.

Lee Seder of Central Kansas Rendering says the company picked up 148 dead cattle Monday, up from the normal 60.

Comments

Clark Coan 3 years ago

Now, some weather "experts" say the heat wave will last until September.

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4chewnut 3 years ago

It's official: We are living in hell with Satan Sam at the helm!

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CreatureComforts 3 years ago

Ah yes...only on LJW could one find a way to attack Brownback even on an article about the temperature...

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K_dub 3 years ago

I would be interested to know what date Lawrence's temperature hit 114.

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grammaddy 3 years ago

Bet it was in 1980. I remember a similar heat wave that year.

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Jonathan Kealing 3 years ago

It was a July day in 1934. I don't have it off hand, but I'll see if I can find it.

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kernal 3 years ago

"... felt like a brisk 110 degrees."

At least we're one degree cooler than Yuma, AZ and two degrees cooler than Death Valley!

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thelonious 3 years ago

p>Weather.com shows Lawrence's previous official all-time high as 111 set in July, 1954. They seem pretty accurate - they also show all-time highs of 114 in Wichita and Topeka, which matches other sources for those two cities. I, too would like to know on what date Lawrence's temperature hit 114, and I would also like to know what is the LJW's source for their statistics. Seems that NWS official statistics would be the guide. Grandpa Simons' notebook of readings he took on his Hires Root Beer thermometer on the south side of the barn does not count. :-)

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thelonious 3 years ago

I'm very familiar with weather underground - can't find any 114 degree day in Lawrence there either. Even if I did, the official statistics are those of the National Weather Service...and as far as I can determine, those show an all-time high of 111 in Lawrence, KS in July of 1954. If that is not the case, someone please cite a source, instead of just posting smack. Factual data should be factual - no response yet from the LJW - they apparently can't find any source for their 114 degree all-time high in Lawrence, either. J. Kealing, what say you? I say, sloppy journalism.

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Jonathan Kealing 3 years ago

Our source was the Kansas State Climatologist, Mary Knapp. The NWS has only kept records for Lawrence since the 50s, and the state has temperature records for Lawrence going back much farther.

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thelonious 3 years ago

Jonathan -

Thanks for citing the LJW's source - I am not sure if the records of the "Kansas State Climatologist" are considered "official" or how they were measured and compiled, but at least we have the source of the 114 degree claim. I have no doubt based on the historical record in other locations such as Topeka that if there ever was a 114 degree day, either 1934 or 1936 could have been the years.

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Erin Graham 3 years ago

That's pretty sweet! Thank you for NOT using weather.com as a source!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (If I could bold, underline, italicize -and- give you a fistbump through the screen, I definitely would.)

Out of sheer curiosity- did they state anywhere what their method of measurement was? Rural/Urban, handheld thermometer/mounted, height of measurement?

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Erin Graham 3 years ago

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/mpp/index.html#MR For anyone curious enough- you can dig pretty deep on the NCDC site. In related internet-wanderings- Drought Impact map from the Ntl Drought Mitigation Center: http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years ago

The hottest I remember it in Lawrence was sometime in the early/mid eighties, when it hit 112°.

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thelonious 3 years ago

So if NWS official statistics are that the all-time high for Lawrence is 111 in July of 1954, where is the LJW/Channel 6 getting their "Lawrence's all-time high of 114 from"? I'll believe it if someone can cite a source, please. Or can we all just make up whatever we want to believe in now?

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David Roberts 3 years ago

What's the record for the largest high-low temperature in a given year in Lawrence?

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Unreal 3 years ago

I feel so sorry for anyone who has to be in this heat, but especially the animals. They have no say if their owner thinks they need to go for a run with them at 5:30 in the sweltering heat, or if their owner leaves them chained outside in the sun, or the poor cows who are stuck on those disgusting feedlots in western KS with no shade, no ponds and no way of getting cool. Hopefully Mother Nature will give us a break soon!

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Curtis Lange 3 years ago

I, too, was under the impression that Lawrence's all-time high was 111°...which we tied. Topeka's all-time high is 114°.

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thelonious 3 years ago

Thank you. Topeka is not Lawrence (thank goodness), and until someone cites a source for this 114 degree all-time hign in Lawrence, I've got to go with the 111 that appears to be the high in July of 1954. Please, someone cite a source, or else quit reporting information as fact that may not be.

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jonas_opines 3 years ago

You take your weather very seriously

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thelonious 3 years ago

I do, but actually I just like to see statements of factual data in news articles cite authoritative sources, such as "according to official National Weather Service statistics, the all-time high temperature for Lawrence is x on such and such date", and so on. Then at least readers know where the information is coming from, and the quality of the source, etc. Without that, it's almost like passing on hearsay.

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thelonious 3 years ago

Interesting...in 2006, the LJW published a story where the same Kansas State Climatologist said the hottest day in Lawrence of 114 happened twice, in August 1934 and August 1936. I am curious whether these Kansas State Climatologist records can be considered official, and also would like to see verification that the NWS has only recorded official weather statistics for Lawrence since the '50's. Here's the link to the 2006 LJW story... http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/apr...

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Finnbar1 3 years ago

jaysus thelonious let it go already..

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thelonious 3 years ago

It's not about letting it go or not letting it go - I just think that if jkealing says "NWS has only kept records in Lawrence since the '50's", he ought to back up that statement. Just saying something doesn't make it so, and journalists and newspapers are supposed to check their facts before just stating stuff. That's all I'm saying.

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beatrice 3 years ago

From someone who lives in Phoenix and is used to high temps, of your 111° temperature let me be the first to comfort you with the standard ... but its a dry heat!

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xclusive85 3 years ago

Beatrice, it is very dry comparatively to the norm for here. Really, when it was a lot more humid and about 100-105 i was much more miserable than I have been today! Thanks for the comfort though.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years ago

I was looking at the hourly temperature forecast a little bit ago.

At 7 am tomorrow, it'll be down to 79°, but nearly 90% humidity-- just short of raining.

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Jimo 3 years ago

haha I was in Chile about a week ago where the big weather news was the Chilean Army's efforts to rescue people trapped in record snow drifts. So take heart --- winter is coming! (You should have seen the KCI TSA lady's eyebrows raise when she pawed through the wool topcoat in my suitcase on my connecting flight to Miami.)

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riverdrifter 3 years ago

The wind went to the WNW around 530pm. This "cold" front will drop us into the mid-90's tomorrow.

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thelonious 3 years ago

Good points - what I was trying to get across was that the only "official" reading would be the NWS temps at their official monitoring station, with their professional instruments, etc. There certainly will be different readings all over town, but every city typically has one (some more) "official" NWS station, and that is typically what is reported by news outlets and is identified as such. As far as I can tell based on all of the posts, we tied the "official" NWS highest temperature ever from 1954 at 111, but fell short of the "unofficial" highest temperature ever of 114 from either 1934 or 1936 (or both).

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Erin Graham 3 years ago

Right on thelonious! To go a step further. Official surface readings are taken continuously from huge ASOS stations located at area NWS and airports (not every airport, but a good deal of them). Anyone that hasn't seen one, go check it out at the one we've got at our airport. It's pretty sweet. Upper air info is taken in about 100 places nationwide. KS has two upper air stations- Topeka and Dodge. Those things and some very tedious equations come together to give forecasters models to look at to begin analysis. Certainly it's not perfect, but considering where we were 75 years ago, it's absolutely remarkable. Few fields of study have grown so rapidly.

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Erin Graham 3 years ago

"What doesn't kill us weatherwise will turn us into freezing cowards on the first 70 degree day in September." - (<--- hehe. Thanks for that- You know we'll all be wearing jackets and hoodies!)

111 was measured from the weather station at Lawrence Municipal Airport. That data feeds directly to NWS for Lawrence's official reading. (If you click this link in the next 2.5 days, the max reading from today will show up) http://www.weather.gov/data/obhistory/KLWC.html In any case, it's too bloody hot! Mid-90s will be a welcome "break". Here's to hoping the dewpoint takes one as well!!!

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riverdrifter 3 years ago

My weather station in BC recorded plus 100 degrees from 1120am to 730pm today. Peak was 111 at 435pm. That's over 1/3 of today at temps above 100. Today was the belly of the beast -we hope.

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KrisSDE 3 years ago

I, too, was under the impression that the record high was 111. Also, I don't know how many other people got this number, but from KU (myself, and many others I know), as well as at my home using my personal weather station & digital thermometer (placed on the porch, in the shade), the highest temperatures we recorded throughout the day were from 112-115, with a humidity reading of 15%. Meaning that was pure heat -- no index factor. I also had a reading of 113 from my Jeep's thermometer, and it was parked on our completely shaded street all day. Yesterday the highest temperature my station recorded was 109.

Where is 110-111 coming from?

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think_about_it 3 years ago

And yet we are still cooler than in 1934 and 1936 which was before global warming was invented.

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riverdrifter 3 years ago

"Where is 110-111 coming from?"

You can observe temperatures from Jeeps, bank themomometers, the one on your back porch and all kinds of other thermistors. I trust in the NWS. From my own and others who have weather stations 111 is the number and I've never seen such unanimity in a daily high temperature. 111: believe it.

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riverdrifter 3 years ago

Actually, BTW, I recorded 111.4 but that still rounds to 111.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years ago

I like the symmetry of "111." Especially from a cool, shady spot.

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ahhs 1 year ago

Cable6 also cites aug 14, 1936 at 114 degrees.

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