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Archive for Monday, September 6, 2010

Church: Stoning in Iran case ’brutal’

September 6, 2010

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— The Vatican raised the possibility Sunday of using behind-the-scenes diplomacy to try to save the life of an Iranian widow sentenced to be stoned for adultery.

In its first public statement on the case, which has attracted worldwide attention, the Vatican decried stoning as a particularly brutal form of capital punishment.

Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi said the Catholic church opposes the death penalty in general.

It is unclear what chances any Vatican bid would have to persuade the Muslim nation to spare the woman’s life. Brazil, which has friendly relations with Iran, was rebuffed when it offered her asylum.

Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani was convicted in 2006 of adultery. In July, Iranian authorities said they would not carry out the stoning sentence for the time being, but the mother of two could still face execution by hanging for adultery and other offenses.

Comments

deec 3 years, 7 months ago

Yeah, but we'd kill her in a civilized way. Like hanging...oh wait....

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jonas_opines 3 years, 7 months ago

I've only kept moderate attention on this case, so I may be in error, but isn't she a widow because her and her lover plotted to kill, and then murdered, her husband?

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yourworstnightmare 3 years, 7 months ago

The Vatican is correct to condemn stoning. Stoning is a medieval retribution that has no place in modern society or anywhere in the modern world.

Stoning is a great example of how religion can easily aid a person or group of people to commit atrocities with moral justification. Stoning is a great example of how religion is in opposition to a reasoned, free, fair, and modern society.

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beatrice 3 years, 7 months ago

"... Perhaps the closest parallel to today’s hysteria about Islam is the 19th-century fear spread by the Know Nothing movement about 'the Catholic menace.' One book warned that Catholicism was 'the primary source' of all of America’s misfortunes, and there were whispering campaigns that presidents including Martin Van Buren and William McKinley were secretly working with the pope. Does that sound familiar?

Critics warned that the pope was plotting to snatch the Mississippi Valley and secretly conspiring to overthrow American democracy. 'Rome looks with wistful eye to domination of this broad land, a magnificent seat for a sovereign pontiff,' one writer cautioned." ...

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/05/opinion/05kristof.html?src=me&ref=homepage

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independant1 3 years, 7 months ago

In 2006, Ashtiani was accused of involvement in her husband's slaying. She was acquitted on that charge but sentenced to 10 years in prison because the killing "disturbed the public order." A separate court then charged her with adultery. But on what grounds was she convicted? Ashtiani maintains that she was coerced into confessing. In addition, Iran's penal code permits judges to determine guilt based on their own "knowledge" if there is an absence of evidence. Three of the five judges deciding her case condemned her to death on that basis. Meanwhile, the man convicted of killing her husband is free after paying "blood money" to the dead man's family.

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beatrice 3 years, 7 months ago

"The fact is that it's near impossible to distinguish between the radicals and the others who only wish to practice their religion until it is too late."

Yes. They all look alike.

Freedom of religion ... as long as it is Christianity.

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 7 months ago

that is: "... alot of and patience and understanding.

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 7 months ago

BAA, you are relatively new to the forum. As you navigate through the discussions and spend some on the forum, you'll discover a startling anti-American sentiment with most of the posters, as they are far-left idealogues and are relatively clueless. They live in a dream world for the most part. They are typically very unhappy. I don't think they get out much or have been many places. Many, not all, are younger with limited life experience. I think they're largely uneducated--many probably don't even have a high school diploma. Most of them have little or nothing to their name and it's someone else's fault---another commonality they share----"it's someone else's fault". They are people who require alot and patience understanding.

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BornAgainAmerican 3 years, 7 months ago

Bozo: OK, I suppose that technically, you could call it totalitarianism... but to say it has more to do with enforcing totalitarianism, while not totally inaccurate is misleading. Muslims believe that the sole purpose of their life is to worship Allah and to follow the teaching of the Qur'an and their prophet Muhammad. Their politics are based entirely upon this concept. The method of enforcement IS Shariah Law. Totalitarianism is a form of government that has many applications. To use it to describe what is going on in Iran is misleading. The means of reigning in Muslim behavior to conform Muslim beliefs and practices is Sharia Law. Why are you deliberately trying to muddy the issue?

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 7 months ago

This has much more to do with enforcing totalitarianism than sharia law.

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BornAgainAmerican 3 years, 7 months ago

Shariah law in the US? I would like to hear from the libs on this one.

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