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Archive for Tuesday, October 26, 2010

New Amazon species discovered every 3 days for a decade

October 26, 2010

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— Scientists searching the Amazon have discovered new species — creatures such as a baldheaded parrot, a blue-fanged tarantula and a bright red catfish — at the rate of about one every three days for the past 10 years, the World Wildlife Fund reported Monday.

Scientists searching the Amazon have discovered new species, including a blue-fanged tarantula (Ephebous cyanognathus) — a remarkable-looking spider discovered in French Guiana in 2000, the species is entirely brown except for two vivid blue fangs- at the rate of about one new species every three days for the past 10 years, the World Wildlife Fund reported on Monday.

Scientists searching the Amazon have discovered new species, including a blue-fanged tarantula (Ephebous cyanognathus) — a remarkable-looking spider discovered in French Guiana in 2000, the species is entirely brown except for two vivid blue fangs- at the rate of about one new species every three days for the past 10 years, the World Wildlife Fund reported on Monday.

The 4-meter-long Eunectes beniensis, the first new anaconda species identified since 1936.

The 4-meter-long Eunectes beniensis, the first new anaconda species identified since 1936.

Martialis heureka, which translates roughly as “ant from Mars,” because it has a combination of characteristics never before recorded.

Martialis heureka, which translates roughly as “ant from Mars,” because it has a combination of characteristics never before recorded.

“What we say now, and we’re very conservative, is one in 10 known species is found in the Amazon,” said Meg Symington, a tropical ecologist and the fund’s managing director for the Amazon. “We think when all the counting is done, the Amazon could account for up to 30 percent of the species on Earth.”

The great diversity of life in the Amazon includes species and habitats that have direct benefits for people worldwide, Symington said. Compounds found on the skin of the poison dart frog, for example, turned out to be important for anesthesia and other medical products.

The World Wildlife Fund reviewed scientific literature and counted more than 1,200 new species — including 637 plants, 257 fish, 216 amphibians, 55 reptiles, 16 birds and 39 mammals — that were discovered in the Amazon from 1999 to 2009. The full count would be much higher, because the report didn’t include the vast majority of newly found invertebrates.

Comments

mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

Are you trying to make our environmental extremists suicidal??

First the gulf was going to be utterly destroyed (and it's doing alright, thank you), and now instead of species going extinct every three days for a decade you're talking "new" species?!?

How does any of this help fundraising?? They need a huge environmental disaster. Is there a way man can 'mistakenly' change all the water on earth to hydrochloric acid?

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 9 months ago

Since you seem to be a bit confused, discovery doesn't mean creation. It's probable that all of these species have been around for thousands, or even millions, of years. Only problem is that they're going extinct just about as fast as they are being discovered. We'll likely never know how many went extinct before they could be discovered.

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

But your day would be so very routine if it weren't for my satiric comments. I know you secretly look forward to them...your liberal 'guilty pleasure'. Our secret. (Well...along with the likes of 'bozo' and 'beatrice' 'grammady' et al.)

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 9 months ago

How many of these newly discovered species taste good if you BBQ 'em?

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 9 months ago

I'll pass on the video. My delicate nature hardly allows me to watch eggs being scrambled.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 9 months ago

What a stupid comment. There is nothing in this article that suggests that whole species, even newly discovered ones, aren't going extinct at an alarming rate. But they are.

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ajmag 3 years, 9 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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bearded_gnome 3 years, 9 months ago

that's cool!

according to the headline, they're finding lots of new forms of female warriors!

world needs more.

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Seth Peterson 3 years, 9 months ago

This is stuff is awesome, while the Amazon while life is still revealing so much there are many places which still have yet to be studied in depth. Given the rate of new discoveries that would probably be made as we continue to do deep-ocean study as well would show how few of the total number of species there are that we know about.

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ivalueamerica 3 years, 9 months ago

I was just there a couple months ago, seeing the pink dolphins, the worlds smallest monkeys, rat like creatures that purr like a chainsaw when you pet them about a foot tall, butterflies of every color under the rainbow, pirañas, bugs as big as my hand, parrots, tucans, Manate..

And saw a couple square miles of it disappear right before my eyes.

I have always and continue to denounce PETA and environmental terrorists, but I have to say, i wept, literally, thinking about how fast we are loosing the rainforest...and how as fast as we discover something knew, something else disappears.

Right wing and Tom ....FAIL

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booyalab 3 years, 9 months ago

It's very unnatural to value other species so much over your own, you know that don't you?

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

But we're the parasites destroying this world.

Take every human off this planet and you'd have an Eden.

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ivalueamerica 3 years, 9 months ago

I don´t.

It seems very natural for you to accuse me of things that are not true though...I wish you could evolve.

I see what have much to gain from the rainforest and hence, can damage our existence by destroying those opportunities.

It then suggests that it is you who does not value our species.

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

I love the "evolve".

Which one of us considers monkeys to be his great grandmommy and pappy? (You do have the advantage of only having to visit the nearest zoo for your family reunion though...)

Not me.

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