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Archive for Monday, November 8, 2010

Deer-mating season poses road hazards

Learn precautions for fall driving in Kansas

Deer feed on grass next to a road near Clinton Lake on Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010. Drivers should be cautious in November, as the amount of deer in and near roadways increases in the fall.

Deer feed on grass next to a road near Clinton Lake on Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010. Drivers should be cautious in November, as the amount of deer in and near roadways increases in the fall.

November 8, 2010

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State agencies recommend precautions

• Be observant for deer when driving near dawn and dusk.

• If you see one deer and miss it, others likely will be nearby.

• Drive slower near wooded areas, green spaces, such as parks and golf courses, and streams or ponds.

• Don’t swerve to avoid a deer. Stay in your lane. The most serious crashes happen when motorists take evasive action.

• Use bright lights and slow down when you spot a deer.

• Pull over onto the shoulder if you hit one, turn on emergency flashers and watch for traffic.

l To report a crash on a Kansas highway dial 47 or 582 on the Kansas Turnpike. If it’s an emergency, dial 911.

About this time every year, Ron King’s staff at his local American Family Insurance agency gets calls from customers who have hit a deer with their vehicles.

“It does seem like there’s been an unusual amount,” King said. “They happen every fall, but it seems like there’s even more than normal.”

Lately, the calls have come in at a rate of about one every other day.

And state transportation, law enforcement, insurance and wildlife officials have begun warning drivers, particularly those in northeast Kansas, about the dangers of deer near highways and roads in November.

Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks biologist Lloyd Fox said deer-mating season, known as the “rut” occurs in the fall and peaks in mid-November. It causes the deer to travel more, and deer are more active this time of year because trees and shrubs become more bare.

This causes issues during shorter days because they tend to move during peak travel times in the morning and evening, Fox said.

According to the Kansas Department of Transportation, 9,628 deer-vehicle collisions occurred in the state in 2009. Douglas County had 212, and 11 people were injured in those wrecks. The average vehicle-deer accident causes $3,000 in damage, according to AAA.

Comments

Seamus 3 years, 5 months ago

There'd be no threat from deer if they just built the damn SLT!

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Slaphappy 3 years, 5 months ago

I've swerved at several but haven't hit one yet. I need to use those tags this year or I'm going to start using my spear with a tomahawk coup de gras.

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blindrabbit 3 years, 5 months ago

I've heard that the peak day for deer hanky-panky here is November 18th; seems to be the same regardless of the weather that particular year.

I live off of Stull Road, and as bad as it is, it's nothing like about 5 years ago. I think the Fish and Wildlife has done something to diminish the herd.

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Mandi McNeer 3 years, 5 months ago

I hit a deer on Highway 24/40 out by Tonganoxie at 1020pm. I was coming around a curve and there he was. There was no avoiding it. SO to those that say its because of people not paying attention you may be right on some but sometimes you just cant avoid it. I totaled my car. The deer hit me I ramped a ditch and went through a fence into a field. it was very scare but luckily we were ok.

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riverdrifter 3 years, 5 months ago

Have not dumped my trail cameras since last Thursday but prior to that there had been a huge increase in activity beginning around Oct. 30. I'll check them today. It should be interesting.

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MarshmallowsFTW 3 years, 5 months ago

Take it from someone who has hit 2 deer in the past year: Don't just be aware during dawn and twilight. Or just during mating season. I hit one in the middle of summer at 5pm (when it's not even close to getting dark)

Be espcially careful on narrow two lane roads (like highway 40) and hills. A lot of times you don't see them until there right in front of you and you have no where to go.

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ronwell_dobbs 3 years, 5 months ago

During deer mating season you have to be more on the lookout for those horndogged-up Nebraska boys looking for some sweet, sweet deer-love. The good news is that the boys are big and white and usually wearin' checkered red plaid. On the other hand, they're a bit slow in the head and don't have very good reaction time.

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BigPrune 3 years, 5 months ago

I hit two deer mating in the middle of the road. Yes, the Beatles wrote a song about this from a deer's perspective, obviously.

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Kontum1972 3 years, 5 months ago

there was a small group up at the Boy Scout Lodge up on Kasold last night..they were up by the teepee...and i saw a buck and 4 females in tow with this stud....on my way to the office this morning....

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 5 months ago

Back when I was driving a lot at dawn and dusk, I had a set of the deer whistles on my car. It seemed like I had fewer close encounters after I put them on.

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Kam_Fong_as_Chin_Ho 3 years, 5 months ago

When I drive on K-10 during this time of year I always make sure to drive behind other cars so they can act as blockers, especially at night when deer are difficult to see.

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kernal 3 years, 5 months ago

I see the most deer on the Stull Rd route between Larryville and Topeka. Those of you who think you're too cool to go the speed limit, deer can be really sneaky and fast. They quietly sneak up to the edge of the highway, smell the scent of a doe and off they go, leaping and gambolling across the highway! All they've got on their minds is sex.

Get out of the way!

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number3of5 3 years, 5 months ago

No driver needs to be bothered with hitting deer. Pay attention to your driving, the road ahead, and go buy a set of deer warners and put them on your vehicle!!!!!!

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fan4kufootball 3 years, 5 months ago

It's not that people who own land do not want to allow hunting on their property but they are afraid of the "sue happy" people who might fall in a hole while hunting or if they are shot by another hunter that did not have premission to hunt, etc.

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CLARKKENT 3 years, 5 months ago

AS KANSAS NOW HAS PLENTY OF DEER, THE WILDLIFE PEOPLE NEED TO MOVE THE SEASON TO THE RUT. IF THEY WOULD ALLOW HUNTING DURING THE ACTUAL RUT, THE HERD WOULD BE THINNED.

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ralphralph 3 years, 5 months ago

It's always a good time to slow down, leave more space around your vehicle for stopping or turning to avoid obstacles, and all that jazz (did I mention using your &#%@&*!! turn signals, you idiot! ... sorry), and yet ... ... ... it is kind of a waste of effort, if the goal is to avoid hitting a deer.

Except in a few areas, here and there, which tend to resemble asphalt petting zoos, you couldn't go out and hit a deer if you wanted to. I've been trying for the last week, and I can't even get a coyote or raccoon. Turns out, it seems, that it all comes down to the math.

There are hundreds and thousands of vehicles out there (depending on the sample area), and only a very limited number of deer willing to come out on the highway. Statistically, your chances of hitting a deer while paying close attention in July are about the same as they are if you are texting while driving in November ... which is to say, effectively, 0 %.

Think I'm wrong? Try it, then. Go out this week and try to hit a deer. Come back and let us know how it went. (prediction: the numbers never lie. you can't do it)

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 5 months ago

My son did his part and removed an 8-pt. buck from the deer population with his bow two weekends ago. Nice buck, nice shot from a 15' tree stand. Guess who got to field dress it---in the dark----after a few bourbons? Talk about a buzz kill! We're getting the shoulder mount for him for his birthday---his first bow kill.

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Tom Shewmon 3 years, 5 months ago

Didn't the Beatles write a song about this.

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Flap Doodle 3 years, 5 months ago

Looking for love in all the wrong places Bambi is.

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Timothy Eugene 3 years, 5 months ago

If more tree huggin' liberals would let people hunt on their land, to manage the deer herds, it would lessen the amount of accidents.

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RoeDapple 3 years, 5 months ago

well of course it's hazardous. that should be goin' on behind closed doors.

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cheeseburger 3 years, 5 months ago

' Drivers should be cautious in November, as the amount of deer in and near roadways increases in the fall.'

Amount, or number?

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