Sports

Sports

Texas claims mythical crown

June 13, 2010

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Texas claimed nearly a third of the regular-season sports championships offered by the Big 12 Conference in the 2009-2010 school year.

The Longhorns’ seven titles were enough to hold off the rest of the league and secure the Journal-World’s mythical conference all-sports championship this year.

How long UT and its mighty athletic budget, which was around $125 million in 2009, will stick around the Big 12 to defend its crown remains in question. Reports have indicated the Pac-10 could make an offer to Texas (along with Texas Tech, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Texas A&M) as early as this week.

For fans, it’s a wait-and-see scenario that will be the college sports story of the summer.

Final standings

Overall

Texas: 191

Texas A&M: 179.5

Nebraska: 166

Oklahoma: 161.5

Texas Tech: 121

Iowa State: 120

Missouri: 116

Oklahoma State: 114

Baylor: 110.5

Kansas: 93

Kansas State: 83.5

Colorado: 71

Men

Texas: 85.5

Texas A&M: 83.5

Oklahoma: 79

Oklahoma State: 67.5

Nebraska: 65.5

Texas Tech: 57.5

Baylor: 54.5

Missouri: 51.5

Kansas State: 42.5

Iowa State: 37.5

Kansas: 33.5

Colorado: 31

Women

Texas: 105.5

Nebraska: 100.5

Texas A&M: 96

Oklahoma: 82.5

Iowa State: 82.5

Missouri: 64.5

Texas Tech: 63.5

Kansas: 59.5

Baylor: 56

Oklahoma State: 46.5

Kansas State: 41

Colorado: 40

As in years past, the Journal-World’s all-sports tabulations used the following formula to determine the all-sports winner: 12 points were awarded for a regular-season league championship, 11 points for second place, 10 points for third and so on. No points were awarded for unsponsored varsity sports.

In instances where sports don’t keep regular-season standings (cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field, swimming, wrestling, rowing, gymnastics and golf), the Big 12 championship for those respective sports was used to award points.

The Big 12 had 22 championships in 2009-2010 — 12 for women and 10 for men.

Texas earned 191 overall points, which edged runner-up Texas A&M (179.5) and third-place Nebraska (166). The Longhorns won league titles in football, volleyball, men’s swimming, men’s tennis, rowing, softball and baseball.

Kansas University, despite winning a league title in men’s basketball, had a rather uninspiring overall finish of tenth (93 points). Both the men and the women finished in the lower division of the Big 12. The Jayhawks’ women had an eighth-place showing (59.5 points), while the KU men placed 11th (33.5 points).

KU’s only league title this past year was in men’s hoops. A big reason for the Jayhawks’ low total was due to last-place finishes in football, men’s and women’s golf, women’s tennis and softball. KU’s next-best finish was third in rowing, but only four schools raced in the Big 12 rowing championship in 2010.

For the most part, the Big 12 South dominated the standings. Four of the top five in the standings (in order from first: Texas, Texas A&M, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas Tech) were South schools.

Iowa State was sixth, followed by Missouri, Oklahoma State and Baylor. Kansas, Kansas State and Colorado brought up the rear.

Comments

Pray4Peace 4 years, 10 months ago

This is the REAL scandal of Lew Perkins' reign. One of the highest paid ADs in the country, with overall responsibility for KU sports, and the overall result has not improved.

The one new development is that the LJW finally is reporting this embarrassment, even though it's too much in love with Lew to lay the responsibility where it belongs.

Let's hope the new AD supports all the programs and all those wonderful athletes, not just men's BBall and football.

iquilt 4 years, 10 months ago

Maybe Big Lew has the right idea on spending more money.......Texas spends the most on athletics and finishes first, Nebraska spends the second most and finishes third. Just sayin.............everyone complains about Lew spending more money and yet they also complain about the low finish of KU in the sports arena of the Big 12?!?!

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