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Archive for Thursday, June 3, 2010

Beehive makes unexpected appearance in Lawrence front yard

Terri Schwager, with the business Anthony’s Beehive, prepares to shake a swarm of bees into a box Thursday. The bees had gathered in a tree in the front yard of Lawrence resident Joyce Barrett. Schwager was there to remove and relocate the swarm to a safe place.

Terri Schwager, with the business Anthony’s Beehive, prepares to shake a swarm of bees into a box Thursday. The bees had gathered in a tree in the front yard of Lawrence resident Joyce Barrett. Schwager was there to remove and relocate the swarm to a safe place.

June 3, 2010

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A swarm of bees gather around their queen on a hive in a small tree in the front yard of a residence at 2908 Whitmore.

A swarm of bees gather around their queen on a hive in a small tree in the front yard of a residence at 2908 Whitmore.

Local beekeepers clear bees from resident's yard

Anthony's Beehive went to southeast Lawrence today to clear 10,000 bees from a resident's backyard. Enlarge video

At first, Lawrence resident Joyce Barrett noticed only a group of neighbor children gathered around a tree in her front yard.

Then she saw what they were looking at: a swarm of about 10,000 bees that had collected on a tree branch outside her home near Prairie Park School.

Barrett, who works at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, admitted it was “way cool” to see, but she figured she had to do something to get rid of her new neighbors, for their safety and for that of the playing children.

So off she went to The Community Mercantile Co-op to find a jar of honey with information about a local beekeeper who could possibly take the bees off her hands.

“I’m a biologist,” Barrett said. “And I didn’t want anybody coming out and harming them.”

So Barrett contacted Anthony’s Beehive, a beekeeping business that sells honey in local stores.

And, as they do eight to 10 times each year, Terri and Tony Schwager, of Anthony’s Beehive, got in their pickup truck and drove out to the swarm.

Terri shook the branch a few times and the bees fell into a box, where they’ll be taken back to join the 60 or so other hives that the company currently maintains.

Stings are rare, Terri said, as the bees are typically pretty docile. She’d heard, however, that one child had hit the swarm with a baseball bat.

Needless to say, that’s not recommended.

She and her husband relocate swarms back to a safe place for free, she said, out of concern for both the bees and nearby residents.

“I’d rather get them there than have them be exterminated or have somebody be injured because of their foolish antics,” Terri said.

Comments

ranger73 4 years, 6 months ago

Wow lighten up francis. What is wrong with a nice light human interest story?

christy kennedy 4 years, 6 months ago

Yeah, Nice story about people watching out for all their different kinds of neighbors.

George_Braziller 4 years, 6 months ago

I've seen natrural hives before but never one like that except in cartoons.

George_Braziller 4 years, 6 months ago

I've seen natrural hives before but never one like that except in cartoons.

KansasPerson 4 years, 6 months ago

You just shake the branch and the bees just fall into a box? Wow, that person must be the bee-whisperer or something! I've never seen that many bees in one place; I think I would have been a bit nervous....

hannahss 4 years, 6 months ago

Umm, bees were in the yard. Even a swarm of bees were in the yard. But there was NO beehive, and that was the problem. A swarm is a natural event, but a beehive appearing in a yard would be remarkable!!!

gphawk89 4 years, 6 months ago

"She’d heard, however, that one child had hit the swarm with a baseball bat."

Wow! Isn't that something that you teach your kid NOT to do at a young age? I guess I haven't specifically told my 3-year-old not to bash a ball of ten thousand bees with a baseball bat, but that should fall under the general "don't bother them..."

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