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Archive for Monday, January 18, 2010

Obama visits Boston in bid to save Senate seat, health vote

January 18, 2010

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— His agenda at risk, President Barack Obama fought Sunday to save a struggling Democratic U.S. Senate candidate and the critical 60th vote needed for his health care plan. The White House and congressional Democrats scrambled to find a way to pass the bill quickly if Martha Coakley loses a special election Tuesday.

“Understand what’s at stake here, Massachusetts. It’s whether we’re going forward or going backwards,” Obama said during a rally for Coakley as he tried to energize his dispirited base in this Democratic stronghold. “If you were fired up in the last election, I need you more fired up in this election.”

The president made a direct appeal to independents who are trending away from the Democrat and sought to court voters angry over Wall Street abuses. He assailed GOP candidate Scott Brown, who downplayed his party affiliation during the campaign, as just another typical Republican who sides with special interests.

The unexpectedly tight race for the seat held so long by Edward M. Kennedy, in a state where registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by 3-to-1, reflects a nasty antiestablishment environment that threatens Obama’s support in Congress now and heading into this fall’s elections.

Brown, a little-known state senator, has tapped into voter anger and anxiety over budget-busting spending, expanded government and high unemployment under Obama to pull even with Coakley, the state’s attorney general.

“It’s us against the machine,” Brown said in Worcester, alongside former Boston College football star Doug Flutie and former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling. “The establishment is afraid of losing their Senate seat. You can all remind them that this is not their seat, it is yours.”

If elected, Brown says he would vote against Obama’s health care bill, robbing Democrats of the 60-vote majority needed to prevent Republicans from blocking it and other parts of Obama’s agenda.

In Washington, White House aides and Democratic lawmakers frantically hashed out plans to save the health care bill in case of a Brown upset. The likeliest scenario emerging would require House Democrats to accept a bill the Senate passed last month, despite their objections to several parts. Obama could sign it into law without another Senate vote needed. House leaders would urge the Senate to make changes later under a complex plan the would require only a simple majority.

Comments

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

When the lemmings in MA start to abandon the Democratic Party, then the times, they are a-changing.

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

I can't believe Massachusetts people are allowed to say the word republican. This is too fantasy to be true. In the end, I think the state stays democratic. But I got to give it to Brown, nice run. I would have never believed a republican would be in the lead a year ago.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

Massachusetts looks to be replacing dumb with dumber.

Stuart Evans 4 years, 11 months ago

should he really be campaigning on my tax dollars? but I guess that's all he really knows..

jaywalker 4 years, 11 months ago

"Massachusetts looks to be replacing dumb with dumber."

What a brilliant take, bozo. You came to that conclusion how? Brown's a Republican, therefore....?

georgeofwesternkansas 4 years, 11 months ago

Brown winning the seat of chappaquiddick fats would be hope and change in action....

repaste 4 years, 11 months ago

Scott Brown, blog.newsweek.com/.../gop-senator-s-racy-pics-don-t-matter-because-he-s-a-dude.aspx - , I think its true, a women that posed nude would be laughed at.

dizzy_from_your_spin 4 years, 11 months ago

Funny how the snake oil saleman is having trouble peddling that leftover 'hope and change' tonic, even in gullible Massachusetts.

repaste 4 years, 11 months ago

c'mon Barrys and tommys, what would you be saying if Coakley had posed nude? No issue?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

Brown has certainly won the mouth-breathers' endorsement.

repaste 4 years, 11 months ago

They saw the nude model pics, kind of like moths to flame

repaste 4 years, 11 months ago

tommy, barry, why does the man get a pass on the nude pics!

repaste 4 years, 11 months ago

Wait barry, you say orientation is genetic, not a choice? You've been outed as a progressive!

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"Do you breath through your nose even when you work out, assuming you ever work out? If you do, I must ponder, who's wise here and who's not?"

It's pretty widely accepted that even while working out, it's best to breath through the nose as much as possible.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

Voting against Democrats is actually a very sane choice. But voting for a Republican is the height of insanity.

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

Don't be suprised if a record number of Imaginary-Americans vote today in MA.

temperance 4 years, 11 months ago

"Think some Black Panthers and SEIU thugs are assembling for some voter intimidation?"

No, Tom, but I think you're a racist who gets childishly excited by the thought of racial violence.

Notice how "thug" has become the preferred substitute for the N word. This last year, white Republicans have truly embraced "thug" as the dog-whistle of choice.

The all-white Brooks Brothers rioters from 2000, of course, were the wrong skin color to be labeled "thugs" -- they were just All-American white, wealthy populists. Of course.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"Bozo, you must not be getting your heart rate high enough. And I must disagree, mouth-breathing is better when you're kickin' it…..with a heart rate getting over 150."

Unless you have problems with your nasal passages, you should still be inhaling as much as possible through your nose, especially in colder temperatures. That doesn't mean that with extreme exertion you won't also need to simultaneously inhale through your mouth, and exhale mostly through your mouth. This facilitates greatly in finding and maintaining a steady pace, and not hyperventilating.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

So tell me, Tom, and all you other Brown supporters, what is his plan for healthcare?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

What's truly scary is that I think you really believe what you just typed, Tom.

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

As long as "let 'em go" Holder is AG, voter intimidation (as long as the correct people are doing it) seems to be okay.

dizzy_from_your_spin 4 years, 11 months ago

Just because Obama-Reid-Pelosi have manufactured a crisis in order to facilitate the government takeover of healthcare doesn't mean Brown has to go along with it. Brown derailing Obama-Reid-Pelosi is a good enough healthcare plan in itself.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

Coakley losing could be a blessing in disguise. If that happens, Obama might just decide that playing footsie with the Republican-lite/DLC/Clintonites has gotten him and the country nowhere fast.

If he wants to beat the Republicans, he needs to stop acting like one.

dizzy_from_your_spin 4 years, 11 months ago

By the way, is Dennis Moore still hiding under his desk?

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

"Coakley losing could be a blessing in disguise." Correct, it may drive a stake through the heart of Dear Leader's current mad scheme on healthcare.

beatrice 4 years, 11 months ago

How sad that the best Republicans have to offer is the hope to filibuster and obstruct needed change. No ideas to improve the nation (which is the reason they are in the minority to begin with), just the desire to protect their own self interests, which, for Republican politicians, means the financial backing of the health insurance and pharmceutical companies.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

The Republican plan actually makes sense from their perspective. If the current bills in Congress fail, and Republicans regain control, then the financial backing of the health insurance and pharmceutical companies that the Democrats have "stolen" from them will return to the rightful owners.

And Republicans don't even have to pretend to care about anybody but millionaires-- all will be right with the universe again.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

Unfortunately, it's the same line of thinking that Rahm Emmanuel has-- he's kind of a Democratic version of Karl Rove.

diplomacy205 4 years, 11 months ago

bozo,

Scott Brown's plan to improve health care in the US is to introduce tort reform that caps the damages from malpractice and liability lawsuits. This action will reduce the amount of defensive and for the most part unnecessary tests that doctors and other medical professionals perform. This should decrease the medical expenditures greatly.

yourworstnightmare 4 years, 11 months ago

The filibuster has become a de facto supermajority requirement, when in fact a simple majority is the constitutionally-prescribed majority for legislation in the senate.

The filibuster is a congressional invention that has no constitutional basis.

Before you crazies use the "Well, the demon-rats did it when Bush was President" excuse, I was opposed to the filibuster then, too.

The filibuster subverts the intent of the constitution, which is a simple majority, and has become a de facto supermajority requirement. This needs to end.

yourworstnightmare 4 years, 11 months ago

He's "The Obama" now. And ouch! By the trainloads!

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"Scott Brown's plan to improve health care in the US is to introduce tort reform that caps the damages from malpractice and liability lawsuits."

In other words, he has no plan whatsoever to improve healthcare or reduce costs.

"This action will reduce the amount of defensive and for the most part unnecessary tests that doctors and other medical professionals perform. This should decrease the medical expenditures greatly."

So the Republicans have picked a "reform" against something that's a very minor contributor to runaway medical costs, malpractice payouts. This so-called reform won't even stop all the testing because the US is primarily a fee-for-service system-- the more tests you do, the more you can bill.

It's a win-win idea for them-- healthcare profits keep skyrocketing (along with contributions to Republican politicians) while they're on Fox News pretending to be doing something by going after their favorite bogeymen, trial lawyers.

sfjayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

It is disappointing that Mr Obama is participating in politics as usual. I was very hopeful that his message of change was legit. So far, no indication that anything has changed. It is unfortunate for everyone that such a opportunity has so far been squandered.

yourworstnightmare 4 years, 11 months ago

The tort reform issue should be considered as a part of an overall strategy to lower health care costs.

This must, however, be balanced with the long-standing American legal tradition of citizens being able to hold corporations/businesses accountable for errors.

As bozo points out, our fee-for-service medical culture will still result in unnecessary tests simply to boost profits.

Also, unless all legal responsibility is removed from doctors vis a vis malpractice, doctors will still feel pressure to do tests just to protect themselves. Malpractice is not a pleasant thing, and doctors will still want to avoid it even if damages are limited and their malpractice insurance premiums are lower.

jumpin_catfish 4 years, 11 months ago

If the bluest state in the union has reservations with the healthcare debacle then what's coming in November? Answer: a serious butt kickin' from the GOP which as a party is in a state of confusion. What's that say for the demorats?

diplomacy205 4 years, 11 months ago

bozo,

His plan is to reduce expenditures by eliminating unnecessary procedures. The unnecessary procedures that doctor are being forced to perform due to the minute chance that they will be sued and held liable for millions of dollars if they don't perform the service. The same effect as the rationing that Canada does but without the government interference.

Are you deliberately misunderstanding the advantages for the health care system? I thought you presented yourself as an intelligent person.

I will spell out one of the simplest concepts besides the reduced procedure count. If the cap amount for a liability claim is known, then malpractice insurance companies are able to better forecast the risk involved. This eliminates a variable in the equation and will allow for better cost estimates, therefore the malpractice insurance companies will be able to reduce their reserves and premiums to the doctors.

I do not know the national figures, but my doctor pays more for his insurance premiums than the combined salaries and benefits of his entire staff.

Lower doctor costs will result in lower patient costs.

I know that this is a foreign concept to you, but if you think about it really hard, you should be able to understand.

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

Maybe Dear Leader should promise to get the Olympics for Boston? Because that went so well for Chicago....

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

TomShewmon (Tom Shewmon) says…

"Think some Black Panthers and SEIU thugs are assembling for some voter intimidation?"

That would be teabaggers. Tom, you of all people should be able to tell the difference.

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

TomShewmon (Tom Shewmon) quotes a conservative blogger that said…

“But does what happen in MA really going to matter? The Boston herald reported that if Brown wins, the dems will try to swear him into office once Obamacare passes. But how? Don't the democrats need a key vote from MA? If they don't then it shouldn't really matter what happens in MA."

The blog you quoted is rife with conspiracy theories. Here's the straight scoop.

If (when) Coakley wins, the delay in seating her whether it is due to the statutory requirements or in an extended version resulting from a GOP challenge won't matter. Kirk would continue to cast his votes until that is resolved. The only real upside for the GOP in that scenario is that they might be successful in their challenge and take the seat. OTOH, if Brown wins, the Dems could challenge, at a minimum delaying his seating the same way Coleman and team GOP did in the MN race. In that scenario, Kirk still votes. Of course, these scenarios pretty much rely on the margin being less than 0.5%. I don't think Brown can pull that off. GOTV efforts in the past have been much more successful in MA for Dems with the fact that they outnumber GOP by 3 to 1. Also factor in that Dems that felt they might stay at home up to a few days ago have been energized by the way Brown's campaign has turned, although he got points for handshaking in Southie and outside the Bruins game and Coakley lost points for calling Shilling a Yankees fan.

Should be interesting, but if the GOP is tying the race to a referendum as they are, you'll hear the crickets or some serious backpedaling come Wednesday morning.

Liberty275 4 years, 11 months ago

obama can only sign a bill both the senate and the house have voted yea on.

Well, I guess he can sign anything, but at the moment it would carry the same weight as if I signed it.

diplomacy205 4 years, 11 months ago

porch-person

You obviously need to work on your reading comprehension skills. I talked about medical malpractice insurance lowering costs to doctors.

I believe that the restriction on health insurance companies operating across state lines should be removed and that the anti-trust exemption should be gone as well.

I talked about lowering healthcare costs, not health insurance costs.

On to the seating the Mass. Senator. I heard but have not verified, that the appointed senator ceases being a senator once the election is held and the candidate meets the eligibility requirements of citizenship and age 35, I don't know if this is accurate but we will all find out tomorrow or the next day,

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

"Massachusetts looks to be replacing dumb with dumber."

And I didn't even realize you were on the ballot, Herr Klowne.

"So tell me, Tom, and all you other Brown supporters, what is his plan for healthcare?"

For a start, wresting control of it back from Dear Leader.

And I thought you were against this bill becoming law, boohoozo? You've been criticizing it enough. Yet now you want it to pass - because that's what your Party masters want?

"In other words, he has no plan whatsoever to improve healthcare or reduce costs."

And the Democrats' plan accomplishes those things how, again, Herr Klowne? Oh, forgot - according to you, it's better if everyone can afford healthcare, even if that healthcare is unavailable.


temperance (Anonymous) says…

"Notice how “thug” has become the preferred substitute for the N word."

You mean - all SEIU members are "N"s?

Are you saying only people of color can be union members?

What a completely racist belief system you seem to have, temperance.


porch_person (Anonymous) says…

"Why would Brown “downplay his party affiliation” if that “party affiliation” wasn't a negative in Massachusetts?"

You really think it would be possible to "downplay" the fact that he's a Republican, poochie? Believe it or not, the people in Massachusetts actually do have TVs, radios, and newspapers.

And, um, according to Real Clear Politics - who you say is the ultimate authority - being a Republican doesn't seem to be such a negative in the commonwealth right about now. How strange, what with Dems outnumbering Repubs by about a million voters, in a place that already has mandatory insurance.

"Universal health care is currently outperforming us in outcomes"

I know you've already lost this argument a thousand times, pooch, but it's amusing to watch you try to spin it nonetheless. What objective measure of healthcare "outcome" are you referring to, again? Why don't you ask your new best-buddy boohoozo - I've been asking him that question for years now, and he still can't come up with one.

"There aren't a whole lot of tests that physicians do that aren't a good idea."

Gee, you just love bringing up old arguments you got spanked on, don't you? I posted the studies a long time ago, pooch-head, showing that all those tests actually result in poorer outcomes. Too bad they used big words you couldn't understand.

"where your tort reform fantasy runs up against the real world is that there is no reason for health insurance companies (which are exempt from anti-trust legislation) to “pass the savings down to you”, so to speak."

Now, pooch-head, since you're so knowledgeable about the Democrats plan and healthcare in general, why don't you take a whack at how that dynamic will change if Senate version of the legislation passes?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"I do not know the national figures, but my doctor pays more for his insurance premiums than the combined salaries and benefits of his entire staff."

Medical malpractice payouts account for less than 3% of overall medical expenditures. The US pays at least 80% more for healthcare than other comparable societies and economies. It's hardly rocket science to conclude that the Republican hysteria about malpractice insurance has any kind of there there.

That doesn't mean that malpractice insurance isn't too high. It's just that the insurance companies are using it to cover their stakes on their Wall Street Crap Games and not on medical malpractice payouts.

But rather than reign in the insurance companies, the Republicans would rather take away your right to sue a bad doctor for bad treatment if it ever happens to you, regardless of your party affiliation.

mr_right_wing 4 years, 11 months ago

You democrats really need to watch it. By your own logic, if anyone criticizes the Obama administration, they're a racist. Well, guess what; the Chairman of the Republican Party is a black man. So, using your own logic against you...all of your insults and criticisms are racist and hate speech. Shame on you!!

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

There's logic involved on your post, MRW. An extremely strained logic...

I take that back. There's no logic involved at all, unless you consider the illogical to be logical, simply because the word "logical" is used to describe the void thereof.

Mike Ford 4 years, 11 months ago

The only minorities that are in the GOP are the ones who agree with the majority view of racial politics. Tom Cole Chickasaw U.S. Rep from Oklahoma just said that using Honest Injun, a racist term was okay. Sellouts like him were the reason that the Chickasaws and Five Nations tribes had internal strife that the U.S. government used to divide conquer and remove tribal nations in the 19th century. The traditional peoples were ignored for the dollar as is the case now with minorities and the GOP. The GOP looks to recruit minorities that agree with their caucasian leadership and be historically devoid of an opinion.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

It's not prejudiced-- it's cynical. Of both the Republicans and their minority recruits.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

"Medical malpractice payouts account for less than 3% of overall medical expenditures. The US pays at least 80% more for healthcare than other comparable societies and economies. It's hardly rocket science to conclude that the Republican hysteria about malpractice insurance has any kind of there there."

Whereas the liberal/Democrat (and in Herr Klowne's case, Marxist) hysteria about the 3.4% profit the typical healthcare plan makes somehow accounts for the difference. Brilliant as always, boohoozo.

By the way, clown, it's not just the payouts. In some specialties malpractice insurance premiums can cost several thousand dollars - per WEEK. One of the worst areas to practice in is OB/GYN, not because there are more bad doctors, but because the mommies of the little crack babies have to blame somebody for their kid being born defective. Which is why it's getting more and more difficult to get an OB, and nearly impossible to get one to accept a high-risk pregnancy.

Why, if it keeps going the way it's going, it will get almost as bad as Canada.

In addition, boohoozo, some studies have shown as much as 40% of expensive diagnostic testing is unnecessary. The reason it's done is because practitioners are scared spitless of being sued, so they make sure that every possible test was done and every possible specialist referral was made.

It's not just the payouts that tort reform would help, Herr Klowne.

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

Looks like Obama is doing the same for Coakley's career as he has done for everyone elses in the nation.....nothing!

Except this time....it is a good thing.

jaywalker 4 years, 11 months ago

"Medical malpractice payouts account for less than 3% of overall medical expenditures. The US pays at least 80% more for healthcare "

And there's a 99% chance bozo pulled those numbers out of his rump.

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

Jaywalker, et al, As of 2007, the costs of malpractice insurance and litigation represented 1 to 1.5% of total medical costs. About 4 to 7% of those injured actually make a claim. State caps, already in effect in many states (including Kansas) typically run between $250k and $500k for non-economic damages. Managed care has brought the percentage of costs attributed to defensive medicine to between 2.5 and 3.5%. Bottom line, as the number of doctor visits since the 80s has increased dramatically, the number of claims has remained about the same and the percentage of costs related to malpractice compared to total cost has decreased.

There's some facts for you.

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

Where is all the talk from the left about how stupid Coakley is, her wardrobe, and hair? Where are the 30 fact check lawyers pouring over her life events? Why, we don't even know if her children really are her children or not.

A little over a year ago these things were all of the utmost importance to the left.

Seriously I don't know if she wins or not, seems to me republicans winning in MA is pretty much impossible odds at this point in time.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

http://www.commondreams.org/cgi-bin/newsprint.cgi?file=/news2005/0707-02.htm

"Healthcare Indemnity, Inc. (HCI), an affiliate of HCA corporation, increased its premiums by $173 million, or 88%, while its claims payments fell by $74 million, or 32%. As a result, in 2004 it paid out only 43 cents in claims for each premium dollar it collected.

Lexington Insurance Company, an affiliate of AIG, reported that its net written premiums increased from $21.1 million in 2000 to 483.0 million in 2004—an increase of $461.9 million, or 2200%--while its net paid losses increased by only $52.9 million. As a result, in 2004 it paid out only 14 cents in claims for each premium dollar it collected.

ProNational Insurance Company, an affiliate of ProAssurance Corporation, increased its premiums by $87 million, or 79%, while its claims payments fell by $43 million, or 63%. As a result, in 2004 it paid out only 13 cents in claims for each premium dollar it collected. Medical Assurance, another ProAssurance affiliate, increased its premiums by $151 million, or 89%, while its claims payments fell by a third. As a result, in 2004 it paid out only 10 cents in claims for each premium dollar it collected."

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

The above post refers to medical malpractice policies.

jaywalker 4 years, 11 months ago

"As of 2007, the costs of malpractice insurance and litigation represented 1 to 1.5% of total medical costs"

Those are nice numbers, flock. Source?

Everyone that wants to downplay the role malpractice plays in skyrocketing healthcare costs tends to ignore the effect the simple threat of malpractice has on "overcare". That's where it holds the most significance; doctors prescribing tests and procedures that are unnecessary or unwarranted at a particular stage because they wish to appease the patient even though they know better. It's not the relatively few lawsuits that occur, nor the retainers or insurance to cover. It's the constant attempt to avoid malpractice claims that jacks up costs.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"Everyone that wants to downplay the role malpractice plays in skyrocketing healthcare costs tends to ignore the effect the simple threat of malpractice has on “overcare”."

Source?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

Excerpt of interview with Anne Underwood

http://prescriptions.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/31/would-tort-reform-lower-health-care-costs/

Q. But critics of the current system say that 10 to 15 percent of medical costs are due to medical malpractice.

A. That’s wildly exaggerated. According to the actuarial consulting firm Towers Perrin, medical malpractice tort costs were $30.4 billion in 2007, the last year for which data are available. We have a more than a $2 trillion health care system. That puts litigation costs and malpractice insurance at 1 to 1.5 percent of total medical costs. That’s a rounding error. Liability isn’t even the tail on the cost dog. It’s the hair on the end of the tail.

Q. You said the number of claims is relatively small. Is there a way to demonstrate that?

A. We have approximately the same number of claims today as in the late 1980s. Think about that. The cost of health care has doubled since then. The number of medical encounters between doctors and patients has gone up — and research shows a more or less constant rate of errors per hospitalizations. That means we have a declining rate of lawsuits relative to numbers of injuries.

jaywalker 4 years, 11 months ago

"Source?"

For starters, how 'bout anyone on this string, jackass? Have you considered defensive medicine in any of your posts? How 'bout the costs to doctors and hospitals for keeping attorney's on retainer or time cost lost in addressing suits? It doesn't take alot of imagination to understand that the suits themselves are only a small portion of the influence our malpractice system dictates to health costs. There's no citation of specific numbers, bozo, just opinion developed over time after studying various sources and then filtering them through myself. Radical idea for you, I'm sure, but here's sixty seconds worth of research for ya:

"Earlier research has provided a possible mechanism for a large effect. Kessler and McClellan (1996; 2002a; 2002b) find that the threat of liability from medical malpractice causes doctors to practice “defensive medicine,” performing extraneous (and expensive) tests and medical procedures to ward off the possibility of a malpractice suit."

http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/petrie-flom/workshops_conferences/2008_workshops/lakdawalla.pdf

"There are essentially two ways in which malpractice law alters health care costs: directly, through the costs of administering the malpractice system; and indirectly, through the effects of the malpractice system on providers behavior."

http://www.princeton.edu/~ota/disk1/1993/9329/932904.PDF

http://www.mccart.com/upload/File/Sep%20Articles/Tangible%20and%20Unseen%20Healthcare%20Costs.pdf

jayhawklawrence 4 years, 11 months ago

The Republicans are in a good position in they can con enough people into believing our problems are directly related to Obama.

It is a good time to review Reagan's presidency and compare it to now.

During the Reagan era, the US borrowed heavily and the national debt went from $700 billion to $3 Trillion.

The unemployment rate reached 10.8 %.

I loved Reagan for many reasons but he was far from perfect. He had to deal with a lot of challenges and some of his decisions were not good.

Obama is in a similar position. The success of the Republicans at this time is not that Obama is a bad President, but it is the power of their rhetoric in scaring the average voter.

What is their goal? It looks like their policies are designed to help the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.

Health care needs to be fixed. We need a forward looking energy policy that isn't controlled by big Oil. We need a better way of relating to the rest of the world. The arrogant bully approach doesn't work.

The Republican Party has not shown any initiative on these issues over the last decade.

georgeofwesternkansas 4 years, 11 months ago

If Brown wins it is over for Obama and the liberal takeover of America.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"For starters, how 'bout anyone on this string, jackass?"

You're such a lover boy (emphasis on boy.)

From the same interview with Anne Underwood.

http://prescriptions.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/31/would-tort-reform-lower-health-care-costs/

Q. But it’s not just the cost of premiums and litigation. What about the charge that it causes doctors to practice “defensive medicine,” ordering tests that are expensive and unnecessary?

A. A 1996 study in Florida found defensive medicine costs could be as high as 5 to 7 percent. But when the same authors went back a few years later, they found that managed care had brought it down to 2.5 to 3.5 percent of the total. No one has a good handle on defensive medicine costs. Liability is supposed to change behavior, so some defensive medicine is good. Undoubtedly some of it may be unnecessary, but we don’t have a good way to separate the two.

Q. Tell me more about the 1996 study.

A. It was published in The Quarterly Journal of Economics by Stanford economist Daniel Kessler and Dr. Mark McClellan, who was head of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services under President George W. Bush. For two types of heart disease — heart attacks and ischemic heart disease — the authors found that 5 to 7 percent of the additional costs in Florida, compared to other states with lower medical malpractice liability, could be attributed to defensive medicine. This was based on 1980s data.

Using that estimate, some politicians used to say that medical malpractice cost the system $50 billion a year. But you can’t blindly say that all diseases are the same as heart disease, and if you want a nationwide estimate, you can’t say every state is the same as Florida. Furthermore, the second study, published in 2002 in The Journal of Public Economics, found that much of the difference disappeared as managed care took hold in Florida in the 1990s.

continued

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

continued

Q. But many doctors complain about having to practice defensive medicine.

A. Doctors will say that. But when you dig down, you find that what’s really happening is that doctors tend to do what other doctors around them do. They go along with the prevailing standard of care in their region — which in many cases isn’t even a state, but a city or county.

Q. If medical malpractice doesn’t explain the high costs of our health-care system, what does?

A.A variety of things. The American population is aging. We’ve had advances in technology that are expensive. We’re also a rich nation, and the richer you get, the more money you spend on health care. And compared to other countries, we have heavy administrative costs from the private-insurance system.

Q. If it’s not true that medical malpractice is driving the high cost of medical care in this country, why won’t the argument go away?

A. It makes sense to people intuitively — in part, because they’ve been told it so often. And it’s a convenient argument for those who want to derail the process. Maybe it’s a deep political game. Maybe they’re raising it to say, we’ll back off tort reform if you back off the public option.

jayhawklawrence 4 years, 11 months ago

It is also appropriate to compare the Clinton era economic performance with George Bush.

http://www.ppionline.org/ndol/print.cfm?contentid=252964

One left office with a projected surplus.

The other left office with the ship of state sinking like the Titanic.

Why should we believe the Republicans are better money managers based on their performance? There is no evidence that they know how to manage the economy any better than the Democrats.

In fact, it appears that the Republicans are very good at increasing the national debt, cutting taxes for the wealthy and making it harder for the average American.

The #1 complaint I have heard from small businessmen over the last 20 years is the high cost of health care. We need to fix the system and the Republicans are the ones who are fighting it.

jayhawklawrence 4 years, 11 months ago

Currently, our health care system is controlled by special interests representing the wealthiest corporations in the United States.

The increases in health care and the loss of benefits has shown no sign of slowing down. It is far outpacing our annual incomes.

These are not signs of a "free market" at work. These are signs of a monopoly taking advantage of Americans and raking in as much profit as they can.

So far, the Republicans and their loud mouths on this blog have been fighting health care reform by making personal and unfounded attacks on Obama and the Democratic leaders.

It is time for people to tell the Republican leadership that we want a health care system that works for all Americans.

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

Jayhawklawrence: Poor wittle Obama...is the republicans mean to him????Awe.

The republicans are not incharge here. The dems have been running the big show and planned to have a bill signed by August. How did that work out? Well they had to pay each other off to get a vote. And the bills they are discussing? Not even the left want them. Unions run to be exempted....if it was so good why did they want to be excluded from the bill? Everyone knows healthcare has to be overhauled, we just got the wrong people working on it.

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

Don't be downhhearted, jay. If Dear Leader manages to take complete control of the economy, I expect he'll start making some changes to that pesky First Amendment. You don't want to be reported for communicating "fishy" information if that happens...

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

leedavid (Anonymous) says…

"Everyone knows healthcare has to be overhauled, we just got the wrong people working on it."

Guess the GOP in Congress didn't get that memo. You didn't hear that they intend to block any HCR measure?

jayhawklawrence 4 years, 11 months ago

I guess you are referring to the practice which the Republicans use which is to promise reform and then not do it or not fund it.

Bush made a big deal out of a very catchy term "no child left behind" and then conveniently forgot to fund it. He left it a burden upon the states.

In fact, there were many financial burdens he transferred to the states.

How ironic that the Kansas Republicans are shouting out about states rights.

They are not the idiots. We are for listening and believing what they tell us.

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

snap_pop_no_crackle (Anonymous) says…

"If Dear Leader manages to take complete control of the economy, I expect he'll start making some changes to that pesky First Amendment."

If that were to happen, which it won't, it would still pale in comparison to the ravaging of civil rights that was conducted during the last admin and GOP-controlled Congress.

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

my pleasure, Tom.

  • warrantless wiretapping, despite having FISA at it's disposal
  • "either you're with us or agin' us" - translation - shut up if you don't agree with us or be ostracized
  • extraordinary rendition and CIA black sites
  • redefining torture, thus making turnabout fair game globally
  • Congressional interference in the Terry Schiavo matter
  • Plame outing tit-for-tat - translation - if you say something that may undermine our goals, we'll retaliate
  • relying on bad or no intelligence to make critical decisions of great consequence
  • "nuclear option" GOP threat in Congress
  • conducting a war, government takeover, and "nation building" in Iraq while the much bigger threat was elsewhere, diminishing our capability to conduct that mission at considerable financial and humanitarian expense, not to mention the damage to our reputation globally
  • secret energy meetings, the coincidental FERC turning a blind-eye to illegal energy gaming, and the subsequent Enron scandal
  • politicizing DOJ
  • allowing financial institutions and market sectors (housing, in particular) to run amok and the resulting massive transfer of wealth and near collapse of the US (and world) economy

This list is by no means complete and, granted, contains some items (toward the bottom) that fall outside of civil rights issues. For many of the items, at least, it truly is a new day, lest we forget.

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

Try the top 5. The 5th one is tied to 1st Amendment.

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

Barry, it's odd that someone who would hopefully value liberty and freedom would manufacture a derogatory term to label instances of violating those very precepts. I guess, for you, liberty and freedom are just words.

That, my friends, is spin at its worst.

jayhawklawrence 4 years, 11 months ago

Here's another bullet point.

  • Revealing Valerie Plame Wilson as a CIA operative. We will never know how much this hurt our national security interests and who it may have compromised.

This was the kind of expediency for political gains that was practiced by Karl Rove and Dick Cheney.

jayhawklawrence 4 years, 11 months ago

My question is this?

When we know how dirty politics is, how can we justify the kind of cult like obedience Americans have toward their political parties.

We need to take a step back and reflect on how much we are being influenced by the rhetoric going on in politics today.

What is true and what isn't?

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

"What is true and what isn't?" Dear Leader giving himself a B+ for the dog's breakfast he's made of his first year in office would fall into the latter category. Or maybe that's simply delusional....

jaywalker 4 years, 11 months ago

"(emphasis on boy)"

Oooo. Another zinger.

"This was based on 1980s data."

Excellent rebuttal, bozo. Data from the '80's when the gigantic leaps in costs has occurred in the last 15 years. Not to mention virtually everything Underwood says about defensive medicine is her own speculation, or that the study she uses for support is based on ONE ailment. Gee, I wonder what the numbers might add up to if ALL the diseases, treatments, procedures, tests, office visits, and specialist referrals were considered. For every state. Yeah, I'll take my sources from Princeton and Harvard studies over your Newsweek correspondent any day.

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

jaywalker (Anonymous) says…

'“This was based on 1980s data.”

Excellent rebuttal, bozo'

That was only for one of the several studies referenced. The rest are more recent. BTW, she even speaks to the single disease limitation of that study. She provides multiple references, not just opinion. If you disagree with them in a substantive way, please furnish your reasoning. Otherwise, you are just a one-trick pony that can't even seem to get the one trick right.

I see, just because one study of several cited happens to be dated, but covers a relevant point, ignore the rest. Reasonable people would find that "logic" foolish.

"Yeah, I'll take my sources from Princeton and Harvard studies over your Newsweek correspondent any day. "

Rather, you will use them because they fit your POV and ignore anything else. Let's hope any others who might be following this thread are more willing to carefully consider all relevant information and draw more informed conclusions. There is no convincing you because your mind is already made up.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

"That puts litigation costs and malpractice insurance at 1 to 1.5 percent of total medical costs."

Congratulations, genius, for failing to realize that there's more to the issue than just the cost of litigation - even after I spelled it out for you.

Since you apparently need to have things repeated to you, there's also the cost of malpractice insurance (which, you were nice enough to point out, are skyrocketing), the cost of unnecessary procedures performed out of fear of being sued, and, BTW, the cost of all those settlemets that were never litigated.

BTW, boohoohoozo - why would you think a 14 year old study is applicable, given your own numbers that demonstrate how much malpractice insurance has increased just in the past year?

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

"$500 BILLION - amount that Americans spend annually on unnecessary care"

http://www.aarpmagazine.org/health/health_care_costs.html

And yes, I realize this is just a lowly article in AARP. I am on my way out of the office and don't have time to find the links for you, but I strongly suggest you investigate the findings of John Wennberg, former director of Dartmouth’s Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, that are referenced in the article. If someone can't show boohoozo and flock how Google works so they can find the studies themselves, I'll post the links later (I've posted them before).

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

A Flock of Jayhawks....did you miss out on the last election? The dems are in total control of congress and could pass any bill they wanted. Republicans had nothing to block with. The left has the president, 60 senators and full control of the house, how did we block anything?

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

With 29% of the precincts counted, Scot is up 52% to Coakly at 47%. Looking good so far.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Looks like Dear Leader's visit helped about as much as it did with the Olympics.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

(CNN) - Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin, a Democrat, told CNN Tuesday that the decision to seat the winner of his state's closely watched special election ultimately rests with the United States Senate.

"The United States Senate is the judge of the qualifications of its own members," Galvin told CNN's Rick Sanchez. "In other words, they get to decide who is seated and when. "

Sen. Paul Kirk, who was appointed by the state's governor to be the interim replacement for the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, will serve until the Senate decides to swear in either Martha Coakley, a Democrat, or Scott Brown, a Republican.

"Senator Kirk will serve until his successor has qualified, that means sworn in," Galvin said.

Though the ultimate decision rests with the Senate, Galvin also said Tuesday that if the results of Tuesday's voting are decisive, he will announce those unofficial results as soon as he can.

"A decisive result would be one that would be beyond the margin for a recount, which would be one half of one percent," Gavin said. "I would also want to make sure that it was outside the margin of uncounted absentee ballots."


And, with about 70% of the vote counted, the margin is 6-1/2 points. Let's see if he keeps his word.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

CNN just called it for Brown.

What, no breaking news ticker on the award-winning LJW?

Liberty275 4 years, 11 months ago

Marcia, Marcia, Marcia has conceded defeat. The Brown guy wins. Obama has failed again.

XXXXX XXXXXXXXX (D), are you listening yet?

Boeing 4 years, 11 months ago

Should be interesting to see what kinda junk the Dems pull with his seating now...nothing at all would surprise me.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Sigmund (Anonymous) says…

"Brown Teabags Coakley"

I can't claim to be too knowledgeable about this one, Sig, but from my understanding, in order to be physically possible, it would have to be the other way 'round.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

My sincere thanks to the people of the Commonwealth, BTW, for remembering their heritage as patriots.

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

Bye bye health care, so long Cap and Trade. Finally rational minds prevail. We now can be the party the dems have called us this year, obstructionist. YES!!!!!!

scott3460 4 years, 11 months ago

Well, mission accomplished.

Whenever, in the future, you hear the claim of liberal bias in the mainstream media, please recall this naked campaign to create a story and then accomplish this result.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Hmmm, this is a little odd.

This story, which was the number one 'Most Discussed' when I made my posts around 8:30, has dropped entirely off the 'Most Discussed' list.

Must be the LJW's editors don't want to be implicated in contributing to mass suicide ...

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

Obama and the Democrats have performed miserably, so the voters have chosen to end their misery once and for all by committing suicide by electing the idiot Republican (instead of the idiot Democrat.)

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

Bozo....Coakely has been elected in MA and she beat democrats to get the nomination. Not exactly idiot material. This was about the state of the country, not so much her.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"This was about the state of the country, not so much her."

And what the hell is this guy gonna do except more of the same idiocy that got us here in the first place? (not that she would have done much different.)

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

He can't do anything, we don't have the numbers. But he can block or slow down this train of spending, health care, Cap and Trade. As far as getting the economy back on track....he will have little to do with that. That will require leadership from a much higher pay grade.

jumpin_catfish 4 years, 11 months ago

Its official, the voters in Massachusetts just gave the Obama, Reid and Pelosi healthcare debacle the flying bird and a big two thumbs down! It's called the will of the people bozo. THE most liberal state in the union is saying no thanks to Obama. Mr. Obama is one and done.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"He can't do anything, we don't have the numbers."

Do what? The Democrats suck, and our only alternative is the Republicans, who are corrupt to the core, and spend most of their time denying the existence of the most serious problems that confront us. Needles to say, they have absolutely no ideas about how to solve them.

Haiti is looking better and better all the time.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

"And what the hell is this guy gonna do"

Stop the madness.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"Stop the madness."

And this coming from the poster voted most likely to go postal.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

“... Republicans, who are corrupt to the core, and spend most of their time denying the existence of the most serious problems that confront us. Needles to say, they have absolutely no ideas about how to solve them."

And just what were the Democrats doing about it, except making it worse, boohoohoohoozo?

You've done nothing but complain about this legislation, and now that there's a realistic chance of stopping it you're STILL whining.

"Haiti is looking better and better all the time."

When are you leaving? I'll bet there are plenty of your fellow LJW message board members who'd chip in on the ticket.

Sigmund 4 years, 11 months ago

Sigmund (Anonymous) says…“Brown Teabags Coakley”

notajayhawk (Anonymous) says… "I can't claim to be too knowledgeable about this one, Sig, but from my understanding, in order to be physically possible, it would have to be the other way 'round."

For your reference .... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teabagging

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

"And this coming from the poster voted most likely to go postal."

Voted by you and your new best friend porchie, Herr Klowne?

scott3460 4 years, 11 months ago

Still here, Tom, ain't going anywhere & proud to be a left wing zealot. The right wing and the monied interest have won the day, but this guy will show his true colors soon enough.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Sigmund (Anonymous) says…

"For your reference …."

Gee, you can find anything on Wiki!

As I said, I couldn't claim to be an expert, Sig - I had the general idea, but for some reason I thought the term referred to the receiver ...

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"Voted by you and your new best friend porchie,"

You nominate and vote for yourself in nearly every post. How many veins and arteries have you burst today?

I hope you keep your scrip for blood-pressure meds filled.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

scott3460 (Anonymous) says…

"this guy will show his true colors soon enough."

We can only hope.

By the way, scott, who did the "monied interest" vote for in the last presidential election?

scott3460 4 years, 11 months ago

"By the way, scott, who did the “monied interest” vote for in the last presidential election?"

McCain and Palin, of course.

Sigmund 4 years, 11 months ago

notajayhawk (Anonymous) says… "Gee, you can find anything on Wiki!"

Gee, if you can find things on Wiki, why didn't look first before asking?

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

"You nominate and vote for yourself in nearly every post. How many veins and arteries have you burst today?"

My blood pressure is just fine, Herr Klowne. Oh, excuse me - Herr Doktor Klowne (I didn't know they gave PhDs in Buffoonery, but if you insist on your honorific ...). They say laughter is the best medicine, which is why I so enjoy coming here every day to read your posts.

But I'm worried about you, boohoohoohoohoozo. It must be so difficult to be you - so full of vitriol. Almost 15000 posts, and every one of them a whining complaint - as mentioned, you've done nothing but b* about the proposed legislation and yet you can't stop yourself from b*ing about its imminent demise.

I suppose I'd be almost as full of spite and sputtering hatred as you, Herr Klowne, learning as you have that even the citizens of the People's Republic of Massachusetts are rejecting your Marxist dogma. Must really s*** to be you.

jaywalker 4 years, 11 months ago

"The right wing and the monied interest have won the day, but this guy will show his true colors soon enough."

Scott, l know we share a mutual respect and have found common ground. Considering how we started, I think that's pretty cool. You are a smart guy despite the Lawrencian Conspi-ranoia virus you refuse to acknowledge. My brother, don't be that guy. Don't be the guy that wrote the above. Don't be so partisan that the other side is always wrong, always inept, always the enemy.
I've seen you decry Limbaugh and Hannity for their narrow-mindedness.........and you want to join their ranks?
You can do better, bro.

scott3460 4 years, 11 months ago

but I believe each and every word of that quote, jaywalker. This guy is just another antichrist republican in sheep's clothing. He will do nothing for the benefit of the vast majority of citizen's he purportedly represents, but will dutifully march in lockstep with the crazy right wing of the republican party. Mark my words.

jaywalker 4 years, 11 months ago

"Rather, you will use them because they fit your POV and ignore anything else. Let's hope any others who might be following this thread are more willing to carefully consider all relevant information and draw more informed conclusions. There is no convincing you because your mind is already made up"

Flock,

Talkin' 'bout yourself? Did you actually believe you said anything with that post? Underwood's conclusions were that there were no conclusions. The data was limited, and the complexity of compiling such isn't anything anyone wants to undertake. Gee, I wonder why that might be? Because it's so freakin' widespread, perhaps? Rest easy, though. You're superior. Your minds' not made up at all.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

scott3460 (Anonymous) says…

"McCain and Palin, of course."

Oops, sorry, no cigar. I'd tell you the correct answer, but it would be kinda' anti-climactic.

"He will do nothing for the benefit of the vast majority of citizen's he purportedly represents, but will dutifully march in lockstep with the crazy right wing of the republican party."

Gee, you're oh-for-two in identifying the correct party tonight, scott. Weren't you referring to the (formerly) 60 Democrats who voted for proposed legislation that almost 60% of the people they supposedly represent oppose?

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Sigmund (Anonymous) says…

"Gee, if you can find things on Wiki, why didn't look first before asking?"

Um, maybe because it really wasn't such a big deal to me, Sig?

Sorry, guy, didn't know this was a subject you take so seriously.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Dems cast blame at each other over Senate campaign

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100120/ap_on_el_se/us_massachusetts_senate_blame_game

WASHINGTON – The buck stops ... Well, it was hard to tell just where the buck stopped Tuesday when it came to the Democratic party's loss of the Massachusetts Senate seat that had been held by Edward M. Kennedy for nearly half a century.

Days before Republican state Sen. Scott Brown officially captured the seat over Democrat Martha Coakley, Washington to Boston began dodging blame and pointing fingers at each other.

Cool-headed analysis of what was driving independents from Coakley to Brown? No. The issue was who botched Democrat Martha Coakley's Senate campaign more: her state people or national Democrats.

Most spoke the classic Washington way, under the cloak of anonymity. But President Barack Obama's senior adviser took precise, public aim at Coakley's camp as Brown closed in on the late Sen. Edward Kennedy's seat.

"I think the White House did everything we were asked to do," David Axelrod told reporters. "Had we been asked earlier, we would have responded earlier."


Let the infighting begin!

Mixolydian 4 years, 11 months ago

Tonight the real losers, the people who are hurting, are the citizens of Nebraska and Louisiana.

Everyone else is doing great.

You can almost hear Nelson and Landrieu give a collective, "ahhhh gawd dangit,"

a_flock_of_jayhawks 4 years, 11 months ago

TomShewmon (Tom Shewmon) says…

"a flock and the rest of you far-left zealots…….are you OK?"

Doing fine, Tom. Thanks for asking. Not a far-left zealot, but it's no surprise that you would try to label me that. Life goes on, it just gets a bit more interesting. Every day is a new opportunity.

Credit to Brown. He ran a good, pretty clean campaign, which is refreshing for a change. Just proves that you cannot take the electorate for granted. You have to earn it every time. I approached every day with that in mind when I served (in a conservative region, btw). And that's the way it should be. Maybe it will serve as a wake up call for everyone in Congress, especially the Dems, given that most mid-terms historically favor the party out of power. As much as many people might be frustrated and criticize our form of government, it is the gradual, deliberate, and most importantly, peaceful way our government can change itself to address the needs of the American people that make America what it is and the greatest nation in the world, despite our problems.

It would be nice to see the parties collaborate for the good of the people. Instead, we may drift back into gridlock and not get away from the politics of personal destruction that has been the rule for so long.

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

A Flock of Jayhawks:

"...It would be nice to see the parties collaborate for the good of the people. Instead, we may drift back into gridlock and not get away from the politics of personal destruction that has been the rule for so long."

Here, Here. Seems like a simple, reasonable thing to ask for. Yet with the exception of rare occassions...completely unachieveable by any level of our government.

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

A quotation from Conan seems appropriate this morning: "Mongol General:... Conan! What is best in life? Conan: To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women." {laughter}

beatrice 4 years, 11 months ago

Tom" "Biggest political news of the past several dacades."

um, hyperbole much?

If the best Republicans have to celebrate and their biggest political news of several decades is being in a minority of 41 - 59, I can live with that.

The Dems in Congress have done a terrible job of not sticking together and passing the needed health reform legislation when they had the chance. When you add the Nebraska back-room nonsense, then they deserve to lose a few seats in Congress. It is still a very strong majority that won't change with the next election.

So, without getting ugly or calling anyone or any group of fellow Americans "disgusting humans," I'll just say, congratulations to the Republicans on this win. Nice to see that you may actually be back in the game.

Question is, will it matter? Will anything now get accomplished? I figure, it won't be long before we get back to arguing over flag-burning and gay marriages, instead of worrying about the real issues that are dragging our country into the toilet, like the need for health care reform.

leedavid 4 years, 11 months ago

Beatrice I agree with much of your post. My exception is will we work on the need for health care reform. There is much to be done with health care reform. However, the most need is the economy. Put people to work, le them get their health care at work, and we can then look to help those remaining. We have to stop the bleeding before we can work on the health of the patient.

Tom: I also saw Brown last night as sounding like someone on a presidential ticket.

monkeyhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

I expected to see the msm (and, of course the masters of this forum) play down the significance of this win in the staunchest of blue states. One of the few who gets it is Chris Matthews. Anyone see his reaction to Maddow's blathering last night? Classic.

The results weren't due to the "clean, articulate male", or the "terrible campaigner" Coakley. It is the people (many dems, BTW) who made a choice - and the people are just getting started. They are not rolling over, and they are coming for the incumbents.

Some day some of you will understand that the ones you are disparaging are a mighty group and a far stronger force than you figured them for. You are only fueling the fire.

Who would have ever thought that the despicable Bush could be surpassed by an even more despicable administration? The best thing you, Pelosi, Reid, Obama, et al can do for your progessive cause is to continue to be exactly who you are. It is too late for redemption.

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

beatrice (Anonymous) says…

"If the best Republicans have to celebrate and their biggest political news of several decades is being in a minority of 41 - 59, I can live with that."

Can you say "beginning of the end," dearie? Sure, I knew ya' could.

You'd have somewhat of a legitimate point if this had been the mid-terms and the Republicans had only picked up a single seat. But it's not the mid-terms. It was the only seat at stake yesterday, and it was one the Dems have held for over 40 years.

It was the first time the public has had a real opportunity to demonstrate their rejection of the Democratic administration's policies, and they did so loudly. They also sent a clear message, one that can't fail to be received, to the other Democrats in congress - after seeing what happened to Coakley, and how the administration and the party left her twisting in the wind, do you really want to side with that administration and that party and try to force through legislation against the will of the people, just 10 months before you face re-election yourselves?

The fact that it was the seat held by Ted Kennedy is even more significant after the Dems shamelessly used the old 'Let's win this one for the Teddie' routine in the healthcare debates (and even had robocalls from his widow going out in a failed attempt to salvage this election).

The fact that you fail to see the significance of this event is the best news of all, bea, dear. That so many liberal/Democrat kool-aid drinkers remain so utterly clueless only means that 1) it will be that much easier for the voters to correct their mistake from November '08, and 2) it will be ever so satisfying when we do so.

Flap Doodle 4 years, 11 months ago

I wonder if Dear Leader has a new appreciation for 19th Century French novels now that he's had a taste of Balzac.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 4 years, 11 months ago

"Who would have ever thought that the despicable Bush could be surpassed by an even more despicable administration?"

So, monkeyhawk, what makes Obama "more despicable?" Is it merely the "D" that designates his party affiliation?

notajayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus (Anonymous) says…

"So, monkeyhawk, what makes Obama “more despicable?” Is it merely the “D” that designates his party affiliation?"

Why don't you ask the voters in the Commonwealth, Herr Klowne? 'Cause I don't think that's why they so clearly rejected his policies.

mr_right_wing 4 years, 11 months ago

Darwin will punish those who support Obama Care. (It is unDarwiny) Repent of your evil ways saith mighty Darwin. (Or perish...!!)

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