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Archive for Monday, August 16, 2010

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Chemical stump removal easy but takes time

If time is not of the essence, using a chemical stump decomposer is the most economical and least labor intensive method of stump removal.

If time is not of the essence, using a chemical stump decomposer is the most economical and least labor intensive method of stump removal.

August 16, 2010

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There are several ways to remove a tree stump from your yard. Depending on the age and size of the stump, some methods work better than others.

Hand digging works well for smaller unwanted shrubs and trees. Gas-powered stump grinders make quick work of larger stumps but can be expensive and difficult to operate in some cases. The most cost-effective and efficient method to remove older, inactive stumps is by using a chemical stump remover, such as Bonide’s Stump-Out.

Step 1: Cut the dead tree trunk so it stands about 6 to 8 inches from the ground. If you are using a chainsaw, keep the bar and chain away from the ground. Dirt will dull the blade immediately.

Step 2: Use a paddle bit to drill several 1-inch holes about 10 inches deep into the top of the stump. The larger the stump, the more holes you should drill. For stumps less than 4 inches in diameter, one hole will suffice.

Step 3: Starting 4 or 5 inches from the top of the stump, use the same paddle bit to drill an equal number of holes at a 45-degree angle into the side of the stump. The angled holes should be positioned to meet with the ends of the vertical holes drilled into the top of the stump. The angled intersection allows for proper ventilation and assures the liquid chemical does not escape.

Step 4: Following the manufacturer’s directions, fill each of the vertical holes with an appropriate amount of chemical.

Step 5: Let the stump sit four to six weeks. The chemical will speed the decomposition of the stump, making it more porous to facilitate its burning.

Step 6: After the stump has dried, fill the vertical holes with kerosene or fuel oil. Let the liquid absorb completely.

Step 7: Pour additional kerosene or fuel oil into one or two of the vertical holes and light the kerosene on fire.

The stump should begin to burn with a smoldering red glow and, eventually, it and its corresponding root system will turn into a pile of harmless ashes.

Comments

rbwaa 4 years ago

does this work with 'live' stumps that have been cut and started to re-grow, or, if not, how are those stumps killed?

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inklines 4 years ago

Are we allowed to burn yard waste inside the Lawrence city limits?

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