Lawrence and Douglas County

Lawrence and Douglas county

Sunflower Electric getting strong support in proposed plant’s home county

Holcomb 1, pictured above, is operating at 85 percent capacity. The Holcomb Station Project proposed by Sunflower Electric Power Corporation would add a second plant that would operate at 90 percent capacity.

Holcomb 1, pictured above, is operating at 85 percent capacity. The Holcomb Station Project proposed by Sunflower Electric Power Corporation would add a second plant that would operate at 90 percent capacity.

August 5, 2010

Advertisement

— Sunflower Electric Power Corp. received overwhelming support for its coal-fired power plant Thursday during a public hearing in the county where it would be built.

Comments taken

The period for the public to comment on the proposed permit is open until Aug. 15. To submit comments by e-mail, send them to SunflowerComments@kdheks.gov. The mailing address is Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Air, Attn: Sunflower Comments, 1000 S.W. Jackson, Suite 310, Topeka, KS 66612-1366.

More than 100 people attended the hearing in Joyce Auditorium on the Garden City Community College campus. Almost all who spoke were in support of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment granting a permit for the project.

Coal plant project gains hometown support

Residents of Garden City are in favor of a plan to expand a coal-powered energy facility. Sunflower Electric wants to build an 895-megawatt plant near Holcomb in Finney County. Enlarge video

Sunflower Electric wants to build an 895-megawatt plant near Holcomb in Finney County. Most of the power would be used by Colorado-based Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association for out-of-state customers.

Eric Depperschmidt, president of the Finney County Economic Development Corp., said the project would help the local economy, and advance the development of wind energy through the construction of more transmission lines.

Earl Watkins, president and chief executive officer of Sunflower Electric, said granting the permit comes down to whether it complies with the law.

“This is about the rule of law, not the rule of whim,” he said. “We believe the application meets the rule of law.”

Environmentalists oppose the project, saying its carbon dioxide emissions will harm Kansans’ health and environment and contribute to climate change.

James Cottrell of Meade said, “Colorado won’t allow a new coal plant to be built in that state so they want Kansas to carry the load.”

One more public hearing will be conducted but a date and site haven’t been picked yet.

Comments

Ricky_Vaughn 7 years, 2 months ago

Can anyone come up with a creative business name around here?

It's always Sunflower This or Free State That. Seriously?

Maddy Griffin 7 years, 2 months ago

Let them build this in Colorado or one of the states where the energy will be used. Why pollute Kansas any more for another state's energy consumption?

KEITHMILES05 7 years, 2 months ago

What a very old and tired suggestion building industry elsewhere. This is hardly novel yet it is very dumb.

Try again grammaddy!

Maddy Griffin 7 years, 2 months ago

Sorry but I've been a tree-huggin' hippie most of my life. I just don't see why Colorado and the other states can't build this in their own states. It may provide a few jobs during construction but those will disappear as soon as it is completed.We need clean energy NOW and this will just put that on the back burner again.

MyName 7 years, 2 months ago

Well yeah, except that, considering the fact that most of the power will be used in Colorado, Kansas is the "elsewhere", and we shouldn't have to be. If you think this is tired and old, then maybe you're just cranky.

sharong 7 years, 2 months ago

The people in FInney County want it because all of the toxic fumes will head east due to the jet stream carrying it from west to east. Its a bad idea to pollute the air when wind turbines do the same job with no pollution. Its all of us east of Finney County that will have the bad air quality.

blindrabbit 7 years, 2 months ago

Sharong: I'm thinking like you, but cannot figure why the residents of Finney County don't understand the West to East weather pattern. You would think that they would place the plant East of Garden City instead of 10 miles West. The smell of the SO2, NOX, Mercury, Particulates and the look of a yellow plume must have dulled their senses. Or perhaps was it the smell of $$$.

That was evidenced in Douglas County a couple years ago when a County Commissioner living downwind of the Lawrence Plant didn't know what county he lived in.

blindrabbit 7 years, 2 months ago

Kansas will eventually "pay" for any new coal plants when USEPA begins to regulate air emissions from such. We will become part of a "air emission transport region", adding our junk to that produced further East and contributing to polluting the Upper Midwest and East Coast.

Does not make long term sense.

newmedia 7 years, 2 months ago

The folks in the Garden City area are probably looking forward to having a few more high paying private sector jobs. Country will no doubt need all the additional electric power it can produce to support all those coal fired Chevy Volts that will be sold.

Steve Bunch 7 years, 2 months ago

Human life in southwest Kansas is not sustainable, and every measure we take to attempt to make it so (i.e., jobs, irrigation, agricultural subsidies, etc.) hastens the time when it will all come crashing down.

blindrabbit 7 years, 2 months ago

Alf: Your concept about the sustainability of human life in SW Kansas is supported by the book "Buffalo Commons" by Popper. People out there will eventually realize this by continuing to plant crops that require much irrigation further depleting the aquifer. The addition of coal fired units, which are major water users, will additionally hasten this .

Commenting has been disabled for this item.

loading...