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Archive for Monday, September 28, 2009

Leaders limit freedoms to block any rebellion

September 28, 2009

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— Honduras’ interim leaders late Sunday suspended key civil liberties in response to “calls for insurrection” by ousted President Manuel Zelaya, empowering police and soldiers to break up “unauthorized” public meetings, arrest people without warrants and restrict the news media.

The announcement came just hours after Zelaya called on supporters to stage mass marches today marking the three-month anniversary of the June 28 coup that ousted him. Zelaya described the marches as “the final offensive” against the interim government.

Zelaya, who surprised the world when he sneaked back into the country last Monday and holed up in the Brazilian Embassy, is demanding he be reinstated to office, and has said that the government of interim President Roberto Micheletti “has to fall.”

The government announced the decree in a nationwide broadcast, saying it was “to guarantee peace and public order in the country and due to the calls for insurrection that Mr. Zelaya has publicly made.”

Comments

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 2 months ago

"Honduras’ interim leaders late Sunday suspended key civil liberties in response to “calls for insurrection” by ousted President Manuel Zelaya, empowering police and soldiers to break up “unauthorized” public meetings, arrest people without warrants and restrict the news media."

This is hardly a new development-- the coup leaders have had these tactics in place from day one.

jonas_opines 5 years, 2 months ago

Informed: I am admittedly just catching up on this subject, which is a rather exhausting pursuit. I have noticed that the back and forth pretty much is you vs. Bozo, with various information sources of various questionabilities (I have doubts that is a word, but I'm tired, I hope it gets the point across). Anyway, I noticed on one of the articles you suggested that Bozo was operating ignorantly, listening to the media, and other corrupt sources of news all coming from Melaya's propaganda machine, and not the people of Honduras themselves, of which he had no knowledge.

Anyway, this claim seems to imply that you Do have some insider knowledge of the people of Honduras's will in the matter. However, I've only seen three sources that you've brought up so far. Two of them appeared to be American op-eds, and reading them it really seemed like once they got to "Marxist" they started simply assuming that it was against the country's will, because no country could ever truly and willingly elect a Marxist. Your third one, the lagringa blog, seemed to be an insider account. Is this the insider source that you are referring to, or do you have further information sources on this matter that you have been getting your information from?

I don't particularly want to come down in some crap partisan slapfest. I'm honestly interested in getting a clear picture of what is going on there, but going by your pre-provided sources, it's either that the entire international media, all of South America's leadership, a great deal of Europe, and our leadership are all lying to us and misrepresenting the events in that country. . . or alternatively one rather-obviously biased woman in Honduras is giving a potentially skewed reading of the situation on her blog.

Those seem to be the two alternatives that you have presented, and if I was a betting man I know which I would consider more likely. So rather than simply make that assumption, I'm asking if you can share any further information sources?

jonas_opines 5 years, 2 months ago

I did read it, informed, and I read a great many of her links, and most of them were about the disapproval of outside intervention in Honduran affairs, not opinions on the coup or on Zelaya himself, so I'd appreciate it if you drop the supercilious "get a clue" crap, as it's not appropriate or necessary.

So am I to just take your word on the existence of these sources and the impartial nature of them? Having seen you post for some time now, my inclination is that your personal sources are Not going to be impartial, because you are not impartial. Are these incapable of being linked to so I can judge for myself?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 2 months ago

"Since most people are refusing to look at the Honduran constitution and what it allows, they come up with assumptions of what has happened."

Not true-- any analysis of the constitution shows quite clearly that the forced removal of Zelaya from the office to which he was elected, not to mention from the country itself, was blatantly illegal and unconstitutional.

"They don't remember (or know) that Zelaya and Micheletti were actually members of the same political party when they came to office. Most people (outside of Honduras) don't know that Zelaya alienated pretty much everyone in Congress after he came to office by his drastic and dramatic move to the left and toward socialism."

Yes, Zelaya had the temerity to do such awful things as raise the minimum wage and lower school tuition for poor people, and the last straw was trying to have a non-binding referendum on whether to have a constitutional assembly. But that's politics, and just because his former compatriots didn't like his political actions doesn't justify a coup. That's what are elections for, but the coup has completely destroyed any chance for legitimacy for the elections scheduled for Nov. 29.

"They refuse to see that by allowing himself to be appointed interim president, Roberto Micheletti put aside his plan to run for president in this or future elections."

That's got to be one of the most strained rationalizations for a raw power grab that I've ever seen.

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