Archive for Friday, September 18, 2009

State unemployment numbers fell to 7.1 percent in August

September 18, 2009

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— The Kansas unemployment rate fell to 7.1 percent for August, down from an adjusted rate of 7.8 percent in July, officials reported Friday.

"The August Labor Report offers two positive economic signs: decreasing unemployment rate and a continued slowing in the rate of decline in total nonfarm employment," said Kansas Department of Labor economist Tyler Tenbrink.

But Tenbrink urged caution.

"While this (the falling jobless rate) is welcome news, we continue to see job losses in most industries, and some industries are continuing to lose jobs at an increasing rate.

"Despite the positive indicators in August, continued job loss is expected in the months to come. It remains to be seen whether the rate at which those jobs are lost will continue to decline or begin to pick back up," he said.

There were 222,219 continued claims for unemployment benefits in August, up from 208,715 continued claims in July, the Labor Department reported.

Just a year ago, in August 2008, the state unemployment rate stood at 4.7 percent.

The unemployment rate for Douglas County was 6.1 percent for August, down from the 6.4 percent level in July. It stood at 4.1 percent in August 2008.

Comments

Shane Garrett 5 years, 7 months ago

I love the positive "spin" on this story. "Despite the positive indicators in August, continued job loss is expected in the months to come. It remains to be seen whether the rate at which those jobs are lost will continue to decline or begin to pick back up," he said.

Hurray for the 545 people who run this country.

Daniel Kennamore 5 years, 7 months ago

Wally,

Even in a healthy economy job loss occurs; the question is whether or not new jobs are being created (hired) at a faster rate than we are shedding them. This is why even though we 'lost jobs' the unemployment rate went down.

sewandsew 5 years, 7 months ago

I don't believe those figures. That doesn't take into account the people that are still unemployed and their unemployment benefits have run out, or the people that have had to take part time jobs to get by until they can find a full time job.

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