Archive for Monday, September 14, 2009

With school fundraisers, less may be more

Corpus Christi school on track to raise same amount with just 2 events a year

Corpus Christi Catholic School kindergartners Jacob Boydston, left, and Joshua King clap their hands with their classmates during music class Thursday, Sept. 10 at the school. In addition to a spring auction, school officials have decided to consolidate school fundraising efforts into one event, "The Big Bazoohley," with a target goal of $33,000 that will go to the school's general fund.

Corpus Christi Catholic School kindergartners Jacob Boydston, left, and Joshua King clap their hands with their classmates during music class Thursday, Sept. 10 at the school. In addition to a spring auction, school officials have decided to consolidate school fundraising efforts into one event, "The Big Bazoohley," with a target goal of $33,000 that will go to the school's general fund.

September 14, 2009

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With school fundraisers, less may be more

Corpus Christi school is on track to raise same amount as usual with just two events this year. Enlarge video

The big bazoohley

The drawing for The Big Bazoohley, a cash raffle, will be at 2:30 p.m. Friday at Corpus Christi Catholic School, 6001 Bob Billings Parkway. The winner will receive $10,000.

At one time or another, Corpus Christi Catholic School students have sold everything from wrapping paper to trash bags to raise money for their school.

Sometimes children and parents were participating in up to four fundraisers each semester. But this year, school and parish administrators took a cue from the parents and are scaling back.

“Over and over again I have heard, ‘Please don’t nickel and dime us,’” Principal Mary Mattern said. “With the economy, it’s a smart decision.”

The school will now have just one fundraiser a semester. Still, school leaders are hoping for the same amount of green, starting with their fall fundraiser, The Big Bazoohley, a cash raffle.

“We need to get to 3,000 tickets sold for us to come up with the same value of what we would have had if we did several little fundraisers,” the Rev. Mick Mulvany said. “The revenue dollars so far are following suit.”

Students are asked to sell one book of 10 tickets at $10 per ticket. With just a few days of sales remaining, the $30,000 goal has almost been reached. In a drawing Friday, one lucky winner will walk away with $10,000.

School administrators are getting a positive response from parents.

“They have been overjoyed with it,” Mattern said. “What I’ve seen with the switch and going to the more simple aspect of it is parents really buying into it and it being a big team approach.”

The simplicity of the raffle is paying off in other ways, too — notably in savings of time and effort from the students and their families.

Previous sales were turning families into delivery drivers. “You end up with 75 cartons of trash bags sitting around the school that kids have to drag out to cars,” Mulvany said. “(Families) really helped make us aware that every time we do one thing, there’s a piece at the beginning and a piece at the end.”

Mulvany said with any given fundraiser in the past, around half of parents and students would participate. By cutting back to just two events a year, he’s hoping that everyone in the Corpus Christi community will get on board.

“We have prizes set up for our children so everyone is vested,” Mattern said. “Together, it’s a team community effort to do what’s best for our children.”

Mulvany noted that parochial schools ask a lot of their parents, including spending time volunteering. Cutting back on fundraisers is another way to make all of their tasks a little easier to handle.

“It made a lot of them smile when we said we were doing it this way,” Mulvany said. “You’re not handing (parents) four other projects and saying, ‘In addition to what we’re already expecting, can you help us with this?’

“We found that (the new fundraising plan) was really a better use of their time and their resources. It’s really helping all of us get a better understanding of the stewardship we’re calling people to.”

Comments

flux 5 years, 8 months ago

I never understood the whole trash bag idea. What ever happened to cookies?

cowboy 5 years, 8 months ago

After raising four kids I always thought it would be easier to just make a straight cash donation and save us all lot of trouble

webmocker 5 years, 8 months ago

On first look, this raffle does not appear to be legal, but perhaps there are details that make it so.

Illegal Gaming FAQs from http://ksracing.org/index.php?id=19

The Kansas Constitution and criminal statutes establish that lotteries are illegal. A lottery is any game, scheme, gift, enterprise, or similar contrivance wherein persons agree to give valuable consideration for the chance to win a prize or prizes. The limited exceptions to illegal lotteries include licensed bingo games, tribal gaming, licensed parimutuel racing and wagering, and the state lottery (including casino gambling).

...

The second important rule is that there is no "charitable exception" to conduct raffles. That is, Kansas's criminal law entails that even the most worthy causes cannot use illegal raffles to raise money.

papergal 5 years, 8 months ago

Yes, there is an exception.

No purchase is necessary to participate, which makes this a legal enterprise.

From the same statute you will find the clause, "The Kansas Attorney General has previously rephrased those exceptions with the clarification that if "no purchase is necessary for participation in the game" then "the game does not include the element of consideration and therefore is not an illegal lottery." KS AG Opinion 1997-26. Whether a proposed raffle or "sweepstakes" actually satisfies the consideration element can only be resolved on the facts and circumstances of the particular game, and with the guidance of your own counsel."

Be certain that this is a entirely legal.

webmocker 5 years, 8 months ago

Cool. So where do we get our free raffle tickets? :-)

middlemgmt 5 years, 8 months ago

I always make a cash donation to the PTO to avoid selling wrapping paper. They get the money they are looking for and I don't have to push it on my neighbors and co-workers!

stjohnscares 5 years, 8 months ago

Having sold candy bars and cookie dough and fiesta tickets and fried fish....I say AMEN!!!! to the idea!

Gary Denning 5 years, 8 months ago

I'd rather pay cash rather than have Boy Scout popcorn, Girl Scout cookies, or any of the other things sold by legitimate organizations.

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