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Opinion

Opinion

Medical marijuana blurs legal lines

November 30, 2009

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— Inside the green neon sign, which is shaped like a marijuana leaf, is a red cross. The cross serves the fiction that most transactions in the store — which is what it really is — involve medicine.

The U.S. Justice Department recently announced that federal laws against marijuana would not be enforced for possession of marijuana that conforms to states’ laws. In 2000, Colorado legalized medical marijuana. Since Justice’s decision, the average age of the 400 people a day seeking “prescriptions” at Colorado’s multiplying medical marijuana dispensaries has fallen precipitously. Many new customers are college students.

Customers — this, not patients, is what most really are — tell doctors at the dispensaries that they suffer from insomnia, anxiety, headaches, premenstrual syndrome, “chronic pain,” whatever, and pay nominal fees for “prescriptions.” Most really just want to smoke pot.

So says Colorado’s attorney general, John Suthers, an honest and thoughtful man trying to save his state from institutionalizing such hypocrisy. His dilemma is becoming commonplace: 13 states have, and 15 more are considering, laws permitting medical use of marijuana.

Realizing they could not pass legalization of marijuana, some people who favor that campaigned to amend Colorado’s Constitution to legalize sales for medicinal purposes. Marijuana has medical uses — e.g., to control nausea caused by chemotherapy — but the helpful ingredients can be conveyed with other medicines. Medical marijuana was legalized but, Suthers says, no serious regime was then developed to regulate who could buy — or grow — it. (Caregivers? For how many patients? And in what quantities, and for what “medical uses.”)

Today, Colorado communities can use zoning to restrict dispensaries, or can ban them because, even if federal policy regarding medical marijuana is passivity, selling marijuana remains against federal law. But Colorado’s probable future has unfolded in California, which in 1996 legalized sales of marijuana to persons with doctors’ “prescriptions.”

Fifty-six percent of Californians support legalization, and Roger Parloff reports (“How Marijuana Became Legal” in the Sept. 28 Fortune) that they essentially have this. He notes that many California “patients” arrive at dispensaries “on bicycles, roller skates or skateboards.” A Los Angeles city councilman estimates that there are about 600 dispensaries in the city. If so, they outnumber the Starbucks stores there.

The councilman wants to close dispensaries whose intent is profit rather than “compassionate” distribution of medicine. Good luck with that: Privacy considerations will shield doctors from investigations of their lucrative 15-minute transactions with “patients.”

Colorado’s medical marijuana dispensaries have hired lobbyists to seek taxation and regulation, for the same reason Nevada’s brothel industry wants to be taxed and regulated by the state: The Nevada Brothel Association regards taxation as legitimation and insurance against prohibition as the booming state’s frontier mentality recedes.

State governments, misunderstanding markets and ravenous for revenues, exaggerate the potential windfall from taxing legalized marijuana. California thinks it might reap $1.4 billion. But Rosalie Pacula, a RAND Corporation economist, estimates that prohibition raises marijuana production costs at least 400 percent, so legalization would cause prices to fall much more than the 50 percent the $1.4 billion estimate assumes.

Furthermore, marijuana is a normal good in that demand for it varies with price. Legalization, by drastically lowering price, will increase marijuana’s public health costs, including mental and respiratory problems, and motor vehicle accidents.

States attempting to use high taxes to keep marijuana prices artificially high would leave a large market for much cheaper illegal — unregulated and untaxed — marijuana. So revenues (and law enforcement savings) would depend on the price falling close to the cost of production. In the 1990s, a mere $2 per pack difference between U.S. and Canadian cigarette prices created such a smuggling problem that Canada repealed a cigarette tax increase.

Suthers has multiple drug-related worries. Colorado ranks sixth in the nation in identity theft, two-thirds of which is driven by the state’s $1.4 billion annual methamphetamine addiction. He is loath to see complete legalization of marijuana at a moment when new methods of cultivation are producing plants in which the active ingredient, THC, is “seven, eight times as concentrated” as it used to be.

Furthermore, he was pleasantly surprised when a survey of nonusing young people revealed that health concerns did not explain nonuse. The main explanation was the law: “We underestimate the number of people who care that something is illegal.”

But they will care less as law itself loses its dignity. By mocking the idea of lawful behavior, legalization of medical marijuana may be more socially destructive than full legalization.

Comments

grammaddy 4 years, 10 months ago

Oh Jeez, George! Smoke a joint and chill out!Legalization is coming.

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unelectable 4 years, 10 months ago

He needs a nice legal completely non-hypocritical drink of alcohol.

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gr 4 years, 10 months ago

What's the difference between "dispensaries" and drug stores? Or liquor stores?

"If so, they outnumber the Starbucks stores there. " Now that you mention it, or caffeine stores?

"Colorado’s medical marijuana dispensaries have hired lobbyists to seek taxation and regulation,"

You mean, like cigarettes and liquor?

"State governments, misunderstanding markets and ravenous for revenues, exaggerate the potential windfall from taxing legalized marijuana."

Yep. Sounds like it.

"so legalization would cause prices to fall much more than the 50 percent"

Guess maybe the illegal drug traffickers would be lobbying against legalization. Got to keep those prices up.

"Legalization, by drastically lowering price, will increase marijuana’s public health costs, including mental and respiratory problems, and motor vehicle accidents."

No problem there. Same can be said about cigarettes and liquor and no one seems too concerned about them.

"the state’s $1.4 billion annual methamphetamine addiction"

Hey! "Medical meth".

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notajayhawk 4 years, 10 months ago

Anyone else notice the strong correlation between Obama supporters and the potheads fighting for legalization?

Just sayin'.

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chmmrx 4 years, 10 months ago

It is important to note the original instances that created our current problem. A racist push for department finances and special interests were the original reasons for marijuana prohibition. Alcohol prohibition had ended. The head of what equaled the DEA 70 odd years ago, needed revenue.. This is the original mindset and process that criminalized marijuana...

Harry J. Anslinger - most direct founder of marijuana prohibition:

“There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos, and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz, and swing, result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers, and any others.” “…the primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effect on the degenerate races.” “Marijuana is an addictive drug which produces in its users insanity, criminality, and death.” “Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men.” “Marihuana leads to pacifism and communist brainwashing” “You smoke a joint and you’re likely to kill your brother.” “Marijuana is the most violence-causing drug in the history of mankind.”

William Randolf Hearst - H.J.Anslinger's Yellow Journalism partner, San Francisco Examiner:

“Marihuana makes fiends of boys in thirty days — Hashish goads users to bloodlust.” “By the tons it is coming into this country — the deadly, dreadful poison that racks and tears not only the body, but the very heart and soul of every human being who once becomes a slave to it in any of its cruel and devastating forms…. Marihuana is a short cut to the insane asylum. Smoke marihuana cigarettes for a month and what was once your brain will be nothing but a storehouse of horrid specters. Hasheesh makes a murderer who kills for the love of killing out of the mildest mannered man who ever laughed at the idea that any habit could ever get him….”

Other nationwide columns:

“Users of marijuana become STIMULATED as they inhale the drug and are LIKELY TO DO ANYTHING. Most crimes of violence in this section, especially in country districts are laid to users of that drug.” “Was it marijuana, the new Mexican drug, that nerved the murderous arm of Clara Phillips when she hammered out her victim’s life in Los Angeles?… THREE-FOURTHS OF THE CRIMES of violence in this country today are committed by DOPE SLAVES — that is a matter of cold record.”

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chmmrx 4 years, 10 months ago

Furthermore:

"Hearst and Anslinger were then supported by DuPont chemical company and various pharmaceutical companies in the effort to outlaw cannabis. DuPont had patented nylon, and wanted hemp removed as competition. The pharmaceutical companies could neither identify nor standardize cannabis dosages, and besides, with cannabis, folks could grow their own medicine and not have to purchase it from large companies. "

After completing a two year plan to brainwash society using these sensationalist reports fostered by racist ideology and funded by special intrest, all these guys needed was evidence.. They of course did find their evidence - A two year campaign of manipulated media-opinion coverage was presented as documented evidence to a government committee..

The committee passed the legislation on. And on the floor of the house, the entire discussion was:

Member from upstate New York: “Mr. Speaker, what is this bill about?” Speaker Rayburn: “I don’t know. It has something to do with a thing called marihuana. I think it’s a narcotic of some kind.” “Mr. Speaker, does the American Medical Association support this bill?” Member on the committee jumps up and says: “Their Doctor Wentworth came down here. They support this bill 100 percent.”

And on the basis of that lie, on August 2, 1937, marijuana became illegal at the federal level.

At this point the enforcement bodies are using similar tactics to maintain negative opinion on marijuana... Current public remarks, ads, and press releases do not contain the same racist sentiment - that is true.. usually... unless indirect... Although... the use of marijuana among users of all races here in the USA are proportionate, but for some strange reason arrests for possession is considerably varied when viewed by race...

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chmmrx 4 years, 10 months ago

No, it is FEAR they still publicly use... Disjointed ads that depict someone neglecting a child or whatever horribly bad imagery they can muster to hold your moral fiber hostage.. Tools of fear, these things are not directly related with marijuana use. There are plenty of people that neglect children with no influence of marijuana. Those are the same people whether they excessively watch TV, play some mmorpg, drink alcohol, abuse steroids, coach a high school football team - what ever - eat pizza every weekend.. the correlation might as well be any of that... Fact is, you would not want intoxication and care of a child together... General opinion supporting this is twisted into acceptance that marijuana makes this happen... Irresponsibility is the fiend, and marijuana did not create the irresponsibility. Imagine the same message blaming beer for causing the child neglect... Excluding propaganda, a seemingly more plausible scenario anyhow, blame seems naturally assigned to the drinker and not the drink... The changing factor is the shroud of "Reefer Madness". Just as in the start.. same old "Earth will plunge into Hell" fear mongering arguments... Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.

Of course, there are entities that benefit from marijuana prohibition and are also sworn to uphold it as part of their very job description.
To quote the DEA, the last time I was at their site:

"The short term effects of marijuana use include: Memory loss, distorted perception, trouble with thinking and problem solving, loss of motor skills, decrease in muscle strength, increased heart rate, and anxiety."

Now lets look at short term effects with alcohol, only briefly though because the list just goes on and on:

The short term effects of alcohol use include but not nearly limited to: Reduced Inhibitions,Loss of Muscle Control, Memory Loss and/or Blackouts, Trouble with Thinking and Problem Solving, Nausea, Vomiting ,Headaches, Hangovers, Stupor, Distorted Perception, Decrease in Heart Rate, decrease in Muscle Strength, Suicidal Tendencies, Anxiety, and Coma.

To put it mildly ..I personally do not think marijuana is addictive. Sources supporting otherwise say marijuana is addictive on a psychological level and not a physical level... So, you think you need it, but your body, including the brain, is not truly addicted.. Negative effects of detoxing for marijuana are as bad as anxious behavior/less patience.. Negative effects of detoxing for alcohol are as bad as death...

Rational individuals, who are agenda free, can not deny the dangers of alcohol.

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chmmrx 4 years, 10 months ago

With further investigation, the prohibition on marijuana is much worse for society than that of its legalization.

Suggest, if you will... Normal everyday citizen... They go to work, balance their check book, pay for things, raise children.. you know, live a normal life with one exception.. they ingest marijuana.. Barring any excessive usage/abuse, (which is clearly the same case as with many already legal substances), these people function fine... except respiratory issues when smoked... Do I need mention it is legal to "smoke"! Now lets look at when that same normal everyday citizen gets arrested for possession:

Prohibition can cause in short:

1) job loss 2) criminal charges 3) loss of children 4) denial of federal aid 5) financial downfall 6) life endangerment 7) loss of freedom

The cruel and unusual punishment list goes on... Point is, again, marijuana prohibition is worse for the individual/society than legalization... and not for a moment should we accept this "gateway drug" propaganda... Those whom do, think this plant is essentially the stepping stone to harder drugs.. This bothers me, the marijuana plant is really the first step of drug abuse, and punished as the worst class of drug? Seems to me, these already invalid arguments contradict themselves anyway... This is cruel and unusual punishment at its finest... You get caught with the first step, and you get punished as if you were on the last step.. Yes, the broad arm of enforcement claims it is favorable in the struggle to discourage usage of marijuana... so it wont draw you in, suck you up into a crazy world of drug culture, and expose you to other harder illegal drugs.. Even pretending this is real.. People still end up paying the exaggerated punishment while campaign results are grim. Prohibition is the fiend, and marijuana did not create the prohibition. Eliminate the black market distribution and good people will no longer need to be exposed to the black market.. Eradication and prohibition efforts have not accomplished this, and I dare say will not.. You have to give it up to the enforcement guys though .. They are charged with upholding this law and to do anything they can that will accomplish that. It is our job to change the laws.. then enforcement will be sworn to uphold the new ones.

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chmmrx 4 years, 10 months ago

In conclusion it appears to me there is big money at work - alcohol, textile, oil, enforcement agencies, drug cartels, etc, all benefit. The rest of us seem to be pawns... that is:

Unless we speak up and let our voice be heard for change in the current law, and against any individual that would have you believe "A law is a law - it does not matter if it is wrong or right!".

The latter happens to be against a founding principle of this great country. Stop wasting resources on this plant. Record eradication every year - as well as - record growth and availability. This is a money pit for something that is no worse than alcohol.

To those whom are against marijuana - free your mind of arguments attached to fear mongering please.

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erck85 4 years, 10 months ago

If its that big of an issue that dispensaries are not delivering compassionate care and are simply out for profit, why isn't there more regulation of the product? Require more product knowledge and perhaps licensure to be a dispensary. Medical Marijuana and full legalization could be great, as long as we don't make a mockery of them during the process. All in due time.

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meggers 4 years, 10 months ago

"So says Colorado’s attorney general, John Suthers, an honest and thoughtful man trying to save his state from institutionalizing such hypocrisy."

Nice objective analysis, Mr. Will. Or not.

And to equate pot usage with meth and the problems assosciated with it is like comparing a One a Day vitamin to steroids.

What happened to limited government, personal choice, and states' rights, Mr. Will? Not to mention the rhetoric we've been hearing lately about about the government getting between a person and their physician. If a physician prescribes marijuana for medicinal purposes, why should government feel that they are in a better position to define the appropriate treatment for that particular patient?

Oh, the hypocrisy.

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jimmyjms 4 years, 10 months ago

Uh, yeah.

"Small government! Let the states decide!"

"Wait, they decided the way I didn't want them to?"

"Legislate morality, I tells ya!"

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kmat 4 years, 10 months ago

jimmyjms (Anonymous) says…

Uh, yeah.

“Small government! Let the states decide!”

“Wait, they decided the way I didn't want them to?”

“Legislate morality, I tells ya!”


Thank you, Jimmy!!!!!!

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lounger 4 years, 10 months ago

Man George. Leave the little people alone that just want to smoke a joint after work or whatever. The reality is a LOT of peeps smoke mary jane-sick or not. It does help the sick and it does help the healthy stay healthy. Its a crazy world....

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Satirical 4 years, 10 months ago

Uh, yeah.

"Big government is the solution to all of life's problems!"

"Wait, they decided the way I didn't want them to?"

"States' rights! States' rights!"

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Satirical 4 years, 10 months ago

Impeccable logic…

Cumulative affects don’t matter.

Anything that is as harmful as alcohol should be legalized.

If I want it, then it must be good for society!

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jonas_opines 4 years, 10 months ago

(Our often baseless guesses on possible) Cumulative affects don’t matter.

Fixed that for you.

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jimmyjms 4 years, 10 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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jimmyjms 4 years, 10 months ago

Jesus, it gets better!

Satirical makes a (baseless and nonsensical) entreaty against so-called "big government," and then advocates for exactly that with his just plain stupid "cumulative affects" (sic) post.

Take a break, buddy.

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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 10 months ago

Marijuana is wrongfully classified as a "Schedule I" drug under the Controlled Substances Act for a number of political, not medical, reasons. The ludicrous nature of this placement is easily discerned when comparing it to other drugs and compounds on those schedules

It should be rescheduled appropriately....as a Schedule III or IV substance.

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Satirical 4 years, 10 months ago

Jonas_opines… “(Our often baseless guesses on possible) Cumulative affects don’t matter.”

And how convenient that most define “baseless guess” as anything which may contradict their preconceived notions.

Your statement holds true for both positions - Some say legalizing marijuana is the end of civilization, other say it will have no negative net affect. Maybe the truth is somewhere in the middle. But we should probably just ignore any studies which don’t support or narrow view...

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Satirical 4 years, 10 months ago

Jimmyjms… “Satirical makes a (baseless and nonsensical) entreaty against so-called “big government,” and then advocates for exactly that with his just plain stupid “cumulative affects” (sic) post”

Nope, just pointing out a little hypocrisy.

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Boston_Corbett 4 years, 10 months ago

The_Original_Bob (Anonymous) says…

Nota

These people would disagree.

Tom Shewmon

Marion Lynn

STRS

Me

TOB

Boston Corbett

Robert T. Stephan, former Kansas Attorney General

What were you “Just sayin'.”? Never mind

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acg 4 years, 10 months ago

I can't even believe people r still arguing about this issue. What a no brainer.

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Satirical 4 years, 10 months ago

acg... "What a no brainer."

How appropriate, when discussing the affects of marijuana.

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Stuart Evans 4 years, 10 months ago

I'm not an Obama supporter, and I am fully in favor of legalization and taxation. decriminalization will do nothing for the problem. that problem being the billions of dollars which are funneled into Mexican cartels and the criminal element that marijuana smokers are forced to deal with. regulate marijuana as you do cigarettes and alcohol. you will see a decline in underage users, and an increase in tax revenue as well as regular money that stays in our communities, instead of funding a war south of the border. by government tally, there are 15 million known regular marijuana smokers in this country. over 800,000 people are arrested every year. It costs the government more than $12,000,000,000 per year to fight this war that has no end and has shown no progress, ever. There are more people smoking/using marijuana today than ever before. so what are those billions of dollars really doing? They are beefing up a non-effective government entity that resembles more of a para-military police state. This war on American citizens must end. marijuana has never been the soul cause of death in anyone, ever. meanwhile, tobacco kills nearly half a million annually in the US alone. Alcohol (not counting accidents) accounts for another 50,000. and prescription drugs kill off another 10,000 or so. These are the legal alternatives to the marijuana plant. the original laws were based on racism and propaganda lies for corporate benefit. We need to rewrite these laws to benefit society, not to benefit DuPont, or Budweiser, or the paper companies.

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Stuart Evans 4 years, 10 months ago

Anyone who wants to educate themselves even slightly on the legalization of marijuana should check out Judge Jim Gray. he's got several videos up on YouTube. This guy is a non-toker who understands the situation with a clear perspective.

pt. 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RWfCw... pt. 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meciIV... pt. 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfwJTg...

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staff04 4 years, 10 months ago

C'mon guys, lay off--notajayhawk probably just got caught up in the theme of Will's editorial: Sweeping generalization after sweeping generalization...

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Calliope877 4 years, 10 months ago

Wow...it's after 3:00 and Practicality hasn't posted on this topic yet...

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jimmyjms 4 years, 10 months ago

"Nope, just pointing out a little hypocrisy. "

Again, you can't really be this stupid?

You yourself have now taken both sides...so the only hypocrisy is your own.

You do understand this, right?

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Satirical 4 years, 10 months ago

Jimmyjms… “You yourself have now taken both sides…so the only hypocrisy is your own.”

I have presented both sides. You have presented a fallacy of false alternatives. Not everything is black and white.

You do understand that you are a hypocrite for attacking conservatives who support federal criminalization of marijuana, and fail to recognize there are liberals (including yourself) who are suddenly in favor of states rights when it supports their beliefs, right? You attack others for being a hypocrite when you are the biggest of them all.

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HogJiver 4 years, 10 months ago

I'll have a comment after 4:20pm

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jimmyjms 4 years, 10 months ago

"I have presented both sides. "

Kinda done playing with you, little guy.

Tell us about the supposed "both sides" you've presented.

You won't, because you have done no such thing.

"You have presented a fallacy of false alternatives."

Um, please show me some quotes where I did anything of the sort.

"You do understand that you are a hypocrite for attacking conservatives who support federal criminalization of marijuana, and fail to recognize there are liberals (including yourself) who are suddenly in favor of states rights when it supports their beliefs, right?"

Read the above again. I have never attacked conservatives for supporting federal criminalization of marijuana (it's already "criminalized"). I attacked a conservative writer who is on the record for decades advocating "states rights" but then suddenly, on this issue, is not for states rights.

Similarly, this isn't my issue (I don't smoke the stuff), and even more to the point, first you're against "big government" and then you're for it.

You don't even seem to know what you're talking about.

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Flap Doodle 4 years, 10 months ago

Expect sales of Cheesy Poofs to skyrocket.

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ksdivakat 4 years, 10 months ago

AreUNorml said it and hes so right! We could pay off the national debt if we tax it, or at the very least, pay down big time on the debt, and it would stop underage users for the most part, and its not as lethal as tobacco. He hit the nail square on the head, why would Government need to research it, its so simple that its not even funny.

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Satirical 4 years, 10 months ago

Jimmyjms…

“Tell us about the supposed “both sides” you've presented.” – jimmyjms 3:48

LOL, you were the one who brought it up: “You yourself have now taken both sides…” – jimmyjms at 3:08

Seems like you forgot what you were previously arguing, so let me help you: “Your statement holds true for both positions - Some say legalizing marijuana is the end of civilization, other say it will have no negative net affect. Maybe the truth is somewhere in the middle. But we should probably just ignore any studies which don’t support our narrow view…” – Satirical at 12:34 p.m. (replying to jonas_opines)

“Um, please show me some quotes where I did anything of the sort.” - jimmyjms 3:48

You made the assumption that there were only two sides in your statement: “You yourself have now taken both sides…” – jimmyjms at 3:08

There are many “sides” to this debate. By claiming someone has taken “both sides,” assumes there are only two. That is called a fallacy of false alternatives since your implication precludes any option other than the two you state, when in fact, there are multiple positions one could take. You should have done a little research into my claim prior to making a fool out of yourself.


“I have never attacked conservatives for supporting federal criminalization of marijuana (it's already “criminalized”) “ - jimmyjms 3:48

So you can’t support the status quo or something that already a law, when others are opposing it? Nice stoner logic...


“I attacked a conservative writer who is on the record for decades advocating “states rights” but then suddenly, on this issue, is not for states rights.” - jimmyjms 3:48

And you failed to realize that you are a well known liberal who opposes this conservative writer who supports states rights, but then suddenly, on this issue, is for states rights. Again, you are a hypocrite.


“first you're against “big government” and then you're for it.” - jimmyjms 3:48

When did I say I was for and/or against “big government” on this post?


“You don't even seem to know what you're talking about.” - jimmyjms 3:48

Yeah, I’m the one who doesn’t know what he is talking about…I think all of your “medicine” has definitely had an impact.

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fastwalker 4 years, 10 months ago

it is the healing of the nations

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denak 4 years, 10 months ago

If medical marijuana is to be legalized across the board then I think there should be certain restrictions in place to make sure that the people using it are using it for a legitmate purpose. I think there should be three steps put in place:

1) Medical marijuana should be prescribed only by a specific doctor who specializes in whatever the person is supposedly suffering from (ie an oncologist for a cancer patient, an opthomologist for a glaucoma patient etc) General practictioners should not be able to prescribe it.

2) It can only be despensed by a liscensed pharmacy. No stores on the corner. A legitimate pharmacy.

3) The individual should pay for it with a "pre-paid" debit card. In other words, if the oncologist believes that the patient should smoke 2 joints a day for the duration of the chemo, then the debit card would have the equivalent on the card. Say 2 joints for 3 days so the card would have 6 joints available. The patient would give the card to the pharmacist and the pharmacist would give the patient the 6 joints. Once the card is empty, then the patient would have to go back to the oncologist and either have the card refilled if it is time for their next round of chemo or tell the onocologist why he or she feels they need more overall. All debit cards should be linked to a central data base so that patients can't jump from doctor to doctor to get more.

I think legalizing marijuana for medicinal purposes is the wrong message to send but if the US is going to go down that road, then, in my opinion, it should be rigidly controlled.

Dena

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jonas_opines 4 years, 10 months ago

Satirical: "And how convenient that most define “baseless guess” as anything which may contradict their preconceived notions."

Oh, in terms of convenience I'd put it somewhere as more convenient than attempting to cover every semantic eventuality within one post, but somewhat less convenient than, say, adding extra explicit politicial qualifications that we're not included prior.

But, on reflection, "baseless" was not the right term. There can be a base. (though, of course, this is counteracted by the inclusion of "often")

Perhaps "our frequently hysterical and often ignorant in nature" is better.

Again, needing no extra political qualifications.

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Stuart Evans 4 years, 10 months ago

Dena Says: "legalizing marijuana for medicinal purposes is the wrong message to send"


I agree. We should not be focusing on medicinal marijuana, we should be focusing on full legalization for all adults.

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