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Archive for Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Lawrence Memorial Hospital board awarded 3 percent pay hike to CEO

May 20, 2009

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The Lawrence Memorial Hospital Board of Trustees conducted its annual evaluation of LMH President and Chief Executive Officer Gene Meyer Wednesday morning.

The board awarded him a 3 percent raise, taking his annual salary to $422,224. The 3 percent was the same percentage increase given to general employees.

The board consulted several independent compensation studies in determining the appropriate pay for Meyer.

“It is essential that our CEO’s pay is competitive,” Joe Flannery, board chairman, said in a press release. “In these difficult times, we must have a leader who can guide the organization and continue to produce results. Lawrence needs a strong hospital, and Gene can help ensure that we stay a strong hospital.”

Meyer has served in his position since May 1997. He has nearly 20 years of experience as a hospital CEO. He serves as a member of the American Hospital Association’s Regional Policy Board.

Comments

Jean1183 5 years, 6 months ago

"The rich get richer while the poor.........."

Get laid off or their hours cut.

thelonious 5 years, 6 months ago

Do you think the difference between $409,946 & $422,224 will impact his quality of life? No, probbaly not, but giving an extra $1,500 per year to a nurse making $50,000 annually would.

I'm ready, and it's time, for more of the spoils to go to the little and middle people and less to the big shots. They'll get by - but lots of little and middle people are not. That's why the economy is such a mess.

Kam_Fong_as_Chin_Ho 5 years, 6 months ago

Jean1183, LMH hasn't laid off a single person, so your comment doesn't really apply.

Thelonious, read the article again. That nurse in your example received a 3 percent raise as well.

Christine Anderson 5 years, 6 months ago

Kam: Where in the article does it say a nurse got a 3% pay raise also? Whether or not LMH has laid off any employees recently, for me, is beside the point. Folks, hospitals are kept running due to the selfless efforts of those who do the "hands-on" patient care. That means nurses, nursing assistants(yes, they work their butts off), lab personnel, radiology techs, unit clerks, food service, environmental services, etc, etc, Please forgive me for leaving anyone out. Yes, Thelonius, a 3 % pay raise would make one hell of a difference for a nurse, or for anyone in the above catagories. It makes me sick that CEO's- of this company and so many others, just keep padding their wallets, and padding, etc.... Hey wait-I know someone who told me that the number of cardiac monitor techs had recently been reduced, and this person was being farmed out to other areas in order to get their hours. Real smart, Mr. CEO. Cut the number of experienced monitor techs who are critical to patient well-being.

Jaylee 5 years, 6 months ago

shoulda spent that money to hire an epidural doc without trifocals and parkinson's!!

Homey 5 years, 6 months ago

I am glad the Trustees of LMH gave him a raise. The article says "the 3 percent was the same percentage increase given to general employees." Why should the CEO get less or no raise when everyone else got one. I suspect that most of the posters here, like me, have no idea what skills are required to run a hospital. However, if you read every article about LMH for the past 10 years the improvements are obvious. These changes have happened since this CEO has been here. I assume the Trustees know better than the rest of us whether the CEO merits this small raise which is far less than the total dollars paid to all of the deserving workers who got a 3% raise. Congratulations to the CEO AND the Staff at LMH for making our community hospital one of the best in the country. Keep up the good work. Thank you Trustees for retaining the right CEO.

thelonious 5 years, 6 months ago

"Thelonious, read the article again. That nurse in your example received a 3 percent raise as well."

I realize that. I am suggesting they should get an extra 3%, and the CEO nothing.

"Why should the CEO get less or no raise when everyone else got one."

Because at $400k plus, he is already more than well enough compensated for doing an admittedly good job. Who else does a good job - those nurses getting 50k a year. It's simply time that the bottom and the middle get more, and the top less. I'm not actually suggesting anything really radical - just let the top dogs get along on their (already) generous pay at current levels for a few years, and give the raises to the staff. Might help, you know, heal the economy a little bit. And the big dogs, like Mr. Meyer, they will be just fine. Really. They'll somehow make do. I've seen it. You can get by on $400k a year, even if you are a hospital CEO.

Homey 5 years, 6 months ago

"And the big dogs, like Mr. Meyer, they will be just fine. Really. They'll somehow make do. I've seen it. You can get by on $400k a year, even if you are a hospital CEO"

Under this logic someone earning $25K a year will complain about giving a raise to nurses who earn $55K a year. Because you can get by on $55K a year, from the perspective of someone earning $25K.

That misses the point, you are paid based upon the value you bring to an organization and what other organizations are willing to pay you for your services. IF LMH's nurses are underpaid they will go work in Topeka or Kansas City. If that is not happening it is because nurses at LMH are a) making a life style choice b) getting paid as much as they can make in other markets or both.

But why compare the CEO to nurses, why not doctors, you have to make more than $500K to live in the Masters, or Foxfire, or the Reserve, etc. where most of the Doctors live. They make far more than the CEO of LMH, it just doesn't get published in the paper. Under your logic those doctors should live in Gaslight Village and donate their fees to the LMH Endowment to pay nurses. The Doctors, Nurses and CEO of a hospital ought to make as much as they can -- provided that the quality of the hospital is improving and the market will pay them that much. It appears that the Trustees gathered independent market information and decided that they needed to pay the CEO a modest 3% to reward him for the positive results of the hospital. I hope they continue to pay him to stay here because our quality of life depends on excellent leadership at our community hospital, particularly in these hard times.

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