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Archive for Friday, May 1, 2009

Pork producers prefer ‘H1N1

May 1, 2009

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— No matter what you call it, leading experts say the virus that is scaring the world is pretty much all pig.

So while the U.S. government and now the World Health Organization are taking the swine out of “swine flu,” the experts who track the genetic heritage of the virus say this: If it is genetically mostly porcine and its parents are pig viruses, it smells like swine flu to them.

Six of the eight genetic segments of this virus strain are purely swine flu and the other two segments are bird and human, but have lived in swine for the past decade, says Dr. Raul Rabadan, a professor of computational biology at Columbia University.

A preliminary analysis shows that the closest genetic parents are swine flu strains from North America and Eurasia, Rabadan wrote in a scientific posting in a European surveillance network.

“Scientifically this is a swine virus,” said top virologist Dr. Richard Webby, a researcher at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. Webby is director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Studies on the Ecology of Influenza Viruses in Lower Animals and Birds. He documented the spread a decade ago of one of the parent viruses of this strain in scientific papers.

“It’s clearly swine,” said Henry Niman, president of Recombinomics, a Pittsburgh company that tracks how viruses evolve. “It’s a flu virus from a swine, there’s no other name to call it.”

Dr. Edwin D. Kilbourne, the father of the 1976 swine flu vaccine and a retired professor at New York Medical College in Valhalla, called the idea of changing the name an “absurd position.”

The name swine flu has specific meaning when it comes to stimulating antibodies in the body and shouldn’t be tinkered with, said Kilbourne, 88.

That’s not what government health officials say.

“We have no idea where it came from,” said Michael Shaw, associate director for laboratory science for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Everybody’s calling it swine flu, but the better term is ‘swine-like.’ It’s like viruses we have seen in pigs, it’s not something we know was in pigs.”

On Wednesday, U.S. officials not only started calling the virus 2009 H1N1 after two of its genetic markers, but Dr. Anthony Fauci the National Institutes of Health corrected reporters for calling it swine flu. Then on Thursday, the WHO said it would stop using the name swine flu because it was misleading and triggering the slaughter of pigs in some countries.

Another reason the U.S. government wants to ditch the swine label is that many people are afraid to eat pork, hurting the $97 billion U.S. pork industry. Even the experts who point to the swine genetic origins of the virus agree that people can’t get the disease from food or handling pork, even raw.

“Calling this swine flu, when to date there has been no connection between animals and humans, has the potential to cause confusion,” Chris Novak, chief executive officer of the National Pork Board, said in a news release.

Comments

gr 5 years, 8 months ago

Hope they remember this for any avian flu because you can bet the poultry industry will object to that.

So now we call things by numbers to keep things clouded so it becomes just another news item, unless the powers tell you to do such and such and then you do it without thinking.

Flap Doodle 5 years, 8 months ago

Starting the countdown to Nick claiming that he was just fooling everybody with his hysteria over H1N1.......

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