Advertisement

Archive for Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Statewide campaign starts to reduce domestic violence

Ten percent of women in Kansas have reported being a victim of domestic or sexual violence. Personal experiences are driving some advocates working for the victims.

July 1, 2009

Advertisement

Former Attorney General Robert Stephan on Wednesday speaks with media on Capitol grounds following news conference launching domestic violence awareness campaign. Stephan was honored for championing passage of Kansas Crime Victims' Bill of Rights 20 years ago.

Former Attorney General Robert Stephan on Wednesday speaks with media on Capitol grounds following news conference launching domestic violence awareness campaign. Stephan was honored for championing passage of Kansas Crime Victims' Bill of Rights 20 years ago.

Joyce Grover, with the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, speaks during news conference to kick off public awareness campaign. Beside Grover, from left, are Attorney General Stephen Six and former attorney general Robert Stephan.

Joyce Grover, with the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, speaks during news conference to kick off public awareness campaign. Beside Grover, from left, are Attorney General Stephen Six and former attorney general Robert Stephan.

— Advocates working to reduce domestic violence kicked off a public awareness campaign on Wednesday, hoping to get everyday Kansans to help stop abuse.

“There’s something that everyone can do to make a difference -- something as simple as knowing the Kansas Crisis Hotline number, 888-END ABUSE,” said Joyce Grover, general counsel with the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence.

“Someone you know will need your help,” Grover said.

The coalition and Governor’s Domestic Fatality Review Board started a “Believe It. Help Change It” campaign that includes radio and television public service announcements, newspaper and online ads, and a Web site, www.HelpChangeKansas.com, which features information on domestic violence and resources for victims.

“Domestic violence victims need the concern of the public and adequate laws and services to address their needs,” said former state attorney general Robert Stephan, who chairs the governor’s review board. “Without public awareness, justice will never be achieved for victims,” he said.

In 2008, domestic violence advocacy programs in Kansas provided 62,000 shelter nights and answered 45,000 crisis calls, the coalition reported. Nationally, on average more than three women per day are murdered by their husbands or boyfriends.

And a recent study found that three of every five victims in Kansas do not know where to go for services.

In Lawrence, domestic violence programs are provided at GaDuGi Safe Center and Women’s Transitional Care Services.

The awareness campaign was launched on the 20th anniversary of the enactment of the Kansas Crime Victims’ Bill of Rights, which Stephan championed. During a news conference, Stephan was presented with a proclamation and a plaque in his name that will be placed by a tree that was planted on the Capitol grounds in 1989 to commemorate passage of the victims rights measure.

Comments

CHANDLER007 5 years, 6 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

dandelion 5 years, 6 months ago

CHANDLER007 , These posters would be the first to call a guy a wimp who is being abused, and that's why many men who are abused by their wives don't do anything about it. Statistically more women are abused, because they are usually smaller than the man. And I wouldn't be surprised if these posters were abusers. They're the ones usually whining the loudest about feminists. Men who whine about not having any rights are sometimes really concerned, but I worked with a guy who joined some men's rights group, because he claimed his ex-wife didn't give him enough visitation and involvement with the kids. He was always ragging about her. Found out later he never showed up for parent teacher conferences, and half of his scheduled visitations. He didn't even call them on their birthdays. Guess he was just too lazy to practice his rights. It's easier to whine.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.