Archive for Friday, January 30, 2009

Weapons expert takes aim at history

Shawn Faulkner, a military history professor at Fort Leavenworth, holds a rifle during a presentation at Kansas University’s Military Science building. Faulkner offered historical tidbits about weapons to about 100 KU ROTC cadets, instructors and others on Thursday.

Shawn Faulkner, a military history professor at Fort Leavenworth, holds a rifle during a presentation at Kansas University’s Military Science building. Faulkner offered historical tidbits about weapons to about 100 KU ROTC cadets, instructors and others on Thursday.

January 30, 2009

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When Gen. George Custer and his men were wiped out in the 1876 Battle of Little Big Horn, they were more than just outnumbered by the American Indians they faced.

Many of the Indians had obtained Henry repeating rifles, which had a faster firing rate than the single shot Springfield rifles used by Custer’s 7th Cavalry.

That was just one of many historical weapon tidbits offered by Fort Leavenworth military history professor Shawn Faulkner during a presentation Thursday at Kansas University.

“What I invent today may be obsolete by tomorrow,” Faulkner said, as he summed up the evolution of military weapons before about 100 KU ROTC cadets, instructors and others in the Military Science building.

Faulkner’s lecture began with what he jokingly referred to as the “model 1” rock and proceeded through the use of swords, muskets, repeating rifles and weapons of today.

About 20 guns were displayed on tables. Among them were a primitive handgun on a long wooden stick, World Wars I and II rifles and a Thompson submachine gun. Also on display were modern machine guns used for ROTC training.

“He brings history alive,” Army Lt. Col. John Basso, an ROTC military science professor, said of Faulkner.

In the Middle Ages, when long bows and swords were used, combat was “about manpower, horsepower, weapon power and muscle power,” Faulkner said. “The first handgun didn’t amount to much, but they are going to give ideas about what they can do.”

Today’s military personnel can learn from the use of the early weapons and how they affected combat tactics, said Army Capt. Aaron Cornett, assistant military science professor in the KU ROTC program.

“If gunmen understand how they were used in the past, they’ll be more effective in the future,” Cornett said.

Comments

Omegatron 6 years, 5 months ago

“What I invent today may be obsolete by tomorrow,” ... Or still in use...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Browning_M2

compmd 6 years, 5 months ago

I have a small collection of military weapons, and the newest technology in them is from WW2. One pistol's design traces back to 1903, and a rifle back to 1891. Newer versions of that rfile designed in 1891 are in use today by troops in the former Soviet satellite countires in Asia. Even today those old rifles can be devastatingly effective at long range.

bondmen 6 years, 5 months ago

Very interesting presentation I wish I could have attended.I'm struck by the use of the term 'evolution' when describing the gradual improvement of firearm technology over time. Did they not improve as men worked on making the operating mechanisms and structures better, faster and more efficient?Why would we not describe this process as intelligent design if it were not we're all in the habit of using the term evolution.

chzypoof1 6 years, 5 months ago

Tumbilweed....really. Don't you have something better to do today? Like complain about the wetlands or something. If it weren't for weapons, you would probably be saluting the swastika and/or the Flag of the Rising Sun. Get over yourself. History is history. Deal with it......poof

stuckinthemiddle 6 years, 5 months ago

"If it weren't for weapons, you would probably be saluting the swastika and/or the Flag of the Rising Sun."~chuckle~ this kind of silly stuff always makes me chuckle...and... so... without weapons the guys with the swastikas and/or the rising sun were going to take over the United States of America with their bare hands...?

Jim Phillips 6 years, 5 months ago

Besides your museum excursion, why shoud we believe you over a military historian? Oh yeah, because he's with the military! Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigt!

drake 6 years, 5 months ago

log- Why is it you can't seem to post anything without spitting your vile hatred of the "rightwing"? It does seem to cloud your judgement most times. You are such a bitter little person. Your life must suck.http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-little-bighorn-were-the-weapons-the-deciding-factor.htm"There were 2,361 cartridges, cases and bullets recovered from the entire battlefield, which reportedly came from 45 different firearms types (including the Army Springfields and Colts, of course) and represented at least 371 individual guns. The evidence indicated that the Indians used Sharps, Smith & Wessons, Evans, Henrys, Winchesters, Remingtons, Ballards, Maynards, Starrs, Spencers, Enfields and Forehand & Wadworths, as well as Colts and Springfields of other calibers. There was evidence of 69 individual Army Springfields on Custer’s Field (the square-mile section where Custer’s five companies died), but there was also evidence of 62 Indian .44-caliber Henry repeaters and 27 Sharps .50-caliber weapons. In all, on Custer’s Field there was evidence of at least 134 Indian firearms versus 81 for the soldiers. It appears that the Army was outgunned as well as outnumbered."

Rusty Coffey 6 years, 5 months ago

Gotta remember.... Custer got Siouxed!!!!

smartparts 6 years, 5 months ago

logrithmic, what you probably remember from the museum is the guide saying, that Custer had better technology. This would be refering to his Gatling Guns, which he had but did not use at the battle. He also did not think there were 10,000 indians, he also thought most of these were women and children, who would put up little fight.

beatrice 6 years, 5 months ago

Hey Abbott, look at this old gun I found!

Flap Doodle 6 years, 5 months ago

"Conyvelts rockets" may be a misspelling of Congreve rockets.

gl0ck0wn3r 6 years, 5 months ago

"RETICENT_IRREVERENT (Anonymous) says…Guns on campus?"I'm sure it took hundreds of forms in triplicate.

Harpo 6 years, 5 months ago

I agree with Logrithmic. This "military history professor" Shawn Faulkner (if that's really his name) is clearly just a rightwing plant by the Ulysses S. Grant administration spin doctors.

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