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Archive for Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Californians looking for the exit

Cindy Reilly, center, sets the dinner table for her children Isabella, 7, left, and Sierra, 4, and her husband, Mike, last week in the kitchen of their home in Nipomo, Calif. The family has decided to escape California’s high cost of living by moving to Colorado in February.

Cindy Reilly, center, sets the dinner table for her children Isabella, 7, left, and Sierra, 4, and her husband, Mike, last week in the kitchen of their home in Nipomo, Calif. The family has decided to escape California’s high cost of living by moving to Colorado in February.

January 13, 2009

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— Mike Reilly spent his lifetime chasing the California dream. This year he’s going to look for it in Colorado.

With a house purchase near Denver in the works, the 38-year-old engineering contractor plans to move his family 1,200 miles away from his home state’s lemon groves, sunshine and beaches. For him, years of rising taxes, dead-end schools, unchecked illegal immigration and clogged traffic have robbed the Golden State of its allure.

Is there something left of the California dream?

“If you are a Hollywood actor,” Reilly says, “but not for us.”

Since the days of the Gold Rush, California has represented the Promised Land, an image celebrated in the songs of the Beach Boys and embodied by Silicon Valley’s instant millionaires and the young men and women who achieve stardom in Hollywood.

But for many California families last year, tomorrow started somewhere else.

More residents leaving

The number of people leaving California for another state outstripped the number moving in from another state during the year ending on July 1, 2008. California lost a net total of 144,000 people during that period — more than any other state, according to census estimates. That is about equal to the population of Syracuse, N.Y.

The state with the next-highest net loss through migration between states was New York, which lost just over 126,000 residents.

California’s loss is extremely small in a state of 38 million. And, in fact, the state’s population continues to increase overall because of births and immigration, legal and illegal. But it is the fourth consecutive year that more residents decamped from California for other states than arrived here from within the U.S.; a losing streak that long hasn’t happened in California since the recession of the early 1990s, when departures outstripped arrivals from other states by 362,000 in 1994 alone.

In part because of the boom in population in other Western states, California could lose a congressional seat for the first time in its history.

Why are so many looking for an exit?

Among other things: California’s unemployment rate hit 8.4 percent in November, the third-highest in the nation, and it is expected to get worse. A record 236,000 foreclosures are projected for 2008, more than the prior nine years combined, according to research firm MDA DataQuick. Personal income was about flat last year.

With state government facing a $41.6 billion budget hole over 18 months, residents are bracing for higher taxes, cuts in education and postponed tax rebates. A multibillion-dollar plan to remake downtown Los Angeles has stalled, and office vacancy rates there and in San Diego and San Jose surpass the 10.2 percent national average.

Median housing prices have nose-dived one-third from a 2006 peak, but many homes are still out of reach for middle-class families. Some small towns are on the brink of bankruptcy. Normally recession-proof Hollywood has been hit by layoffs.

“You see wages go down and the cost of living go up,” Reilly says. His property taxes will be $1,300 in Colorado, down from $4,300 on his three-bedroom house in Nipomo, about 80 miles up the coast from Santa Barbara.

News gets worse

California’s obituary has been written before — “California: The Endangered Dream” was the title of a 1991 Time magazine cover story. The Golden State and its huge economy — by itself, the eighth-largest in the world — have shown resilience, weathering the aerospace bust, the dot-com crash and an energy crunch in recent years.

But this time, the news just keeps getting worse.

A state board halted lending for about 2,000 public works projects in California worth more than $16 billion because the state could not afford them. A report by Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., last month said the state lost 100,000 jobs in the last year and the erosion of home prices eliminated over $1 trillion in wealth.

“I don’t think the California dream, per se, is over. It has become and will continue to become grittier,” says New America Foundation senior fellow Gregory Rodriguez. “Now, perhaps, we have to reassess the California of our imagination.”

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is among those who say the state needs to create itself anew, rebuilding roads, schools and transit.

“We’ve lived off the investments our parents made in the ’50s and ’60s for a long time,” says Tim Hodson, director of the Center for California Studies at California State University, Sacramento. “We’re somewhat in the position of a Rust Belt state in the 1970s.”

Comments

Flap Doodle 5 years, 3 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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Flap Doodle 5 years, 3 months ago

The official clown shoe of California is the Whoopie! Shoes "Flub-a-Dub Classic" model (brown with green polka dots).http://www.timeforpie.org

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madmike 5 years, 3 months ago

On the bright side...If you own land on the eastern side of the San Andreas Fault, you may have future beach front property!

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autie 5 years, 3 months ago

the problem with California is that it is full of Califonians.

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Flap Doodle 5 years, 3 months ago

The official state spark plug of California is the Champion Silvertip Supreme.http://www2.squidarebad.comThe official state pencil of California is the Ticonderoga No. 2 (yellow).http://'www.cheeseandtaxidermy.org

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invictus 5 years, 3 months ago

For the most part “only stupid people are breeding.”

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invictus 5 years, 3 months ago

If high fertility rates were good for the economy then Haiti should be a power house by now. Europe knows that quality is better than quantity.

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max1 5 years, 3 months ago

"Send maxipad back to the left coast!" -madmikeI have offers to move back all the time, and it would sure beat the hell out of living around cranky old white people.The Future of American PowerHow America Can Survive the Rise of the Rest by Fareed ZakariaThe U.S. economy has been the world's largest since the middle of the 1880s, and it remains so today. . . Most estimates suggest that in 2025 the United States' economy will still be twice the size of China's in terms of nominal GDP. . . Europe has one crucial disadvantage. Or, to put it more accurately, the United States has one crucial advantage over Europe and most of the developed world. The United States is demographically vibrant. . . Nicholas Eberstadt, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, estimates that the U.S. population will increase by 65 million by 2030, whereas Europe's population will remain "virtually stagnant." Europe, Eberstadt notes, "will by that time have more than twice as many seniors older than 65 than children under 15 . . . In the United States, by contrast, children will continue to outnumber the elderly. . . The effects of an aging population are considerable. First, there is the pension burden -- fewer workers supporting more gray-haired elders. . . The United States' potential advantages today are in large part a product of immigration. Without immigration, the United States' GDP growth over the last quarter century would have been the same as Europe's. Native-born white Americans have the same low fertility rates as Europeans.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 3 months ago

oh, wait, apparently that was difinitive, more or less, I looked it up on the Tool site without realizing it was the real Tool site, and that's what maynard had submitted.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 3 months ago

labmonkey: Great song, of course, but I'm almost positive that there's an error in there. I'm almost positive that it says this:"Mother's gonna fix it all soon. Momma's gonna drown it and put it back the way it ought to be."Mother, in this case, I imagine to be mother nature or mother earth, which makes more sense in the context of the song than man-made bombs.Tool songs are tough to transcribe, ne?

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macon47 5 years, 3 months ago

infestation of illegal immigrantsplain and simple.even while the liberals love themthey caNnot afford them eitherbut obamba will bail out theillegals and give them some of your tax money

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madmike 5 years, 3 months ago

Send maxipad back to the left coast!

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jaywalker 5 years, 3 months ago

I've got two unmarked pennies I'm throwin' into a jar to kick off the "Help Maxie Get a Life Fund". Anyone feelin' generous?

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tumbilweed 5 years, 3 months ago

Everybody has to live somewhere. If you go totally nomadic, you are never really are from anywhere and then the commenters can't touch you with their stereotypes. When you eat beef, you are eating the granola and the tofu that the farmer fed to the beef. Go hippies!

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max1 5 years, 3 months ago

Statistics from the FBI Uniform Crime Rate (2004 database), and the US Census BureauNew York, New York Murder/NNH: 7.0 per 100,000; a property crime rate of 2113.1 incidents per 100,000New York City (census 2000) Non-Hispanic White 35.1%; Hispanic or Latino 27.4% Kansas City, KansasMurder/NNH: 25.3 per 100,000; a property crime rate of 8926.3 incidents per 100,000Kansas City, Kansas (2000 census) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 16.8%Kansas City, MissouriMurder/NNH: 19.9 per 100,000; a property crime rate of 7850.7 incidents per 100,000Kansas City, Missouri (census 2000) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 6.9%Miami, FloridaMurder/NNH: 17.9 per 100,000; a property crime rate of 6361.9 incidents per 100,000Miami, Florida (census 2000) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 65.8%Los Angeles, CaliforniaMurder/NNH: 13.4 per 100,000; a property crime rate of 3496.9 incidents per 100,000Los Angeles, California (census 2000) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 46.5%San Francisco, CaliforniaMurder/NNH: 11.6 per 100,000; a property crime rate of 4717.4 incidents per 100,000San Francisco, California (census 2000) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 14.1%Liberal, Kansas has a violent crime rate of 442 incidents per 100,000 people.Liberal (2000 census) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 43.3%Lawrence, Kansas has a violent crime rate of 445 incidents per 100,000 people.Lawrence (2000 census) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 3.6%Garden City, Kansas has a violent crime rate of 446 incidents per 100,000 people.Garden City (2000 census) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 43.9%Dodge City, Kansas has a violent crime rate of 541 incidents per 100,000 people.Dodge City (2000 census) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 42.9%Junction City, Kansas has a violent crime rate of 941 incidents per 100,000 people.Junction City (2000 census) Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin: 8.3%

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max1 5 years, 3 months ago

"my high school was majority hispanic, and most graduates had poor or nonexistent grasp of english.sanctuary cities: LA/SF is directly tied to deaths of Americans." -slobbering_gnomeThose deaths were gang related, and gangs are not representative of all Hispanic immigrants (legal or illegal). Enjoy these links and statistics from my demographic files:http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/Story?id=3459498&page=1Aug. 8, 2007: "If you look at lists compiled on Web sites of sanctuary cities, New York is at the top of the list when Mayor Giuliani was mayor," Romney said.http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/29/us/politics/29truth.html?fta=y“I believe the anti-immigration movement in America is one of our most serious public problems" -Rudolph W. Giulianihttp://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/15/nyregion/15minority.htmlAugust 15, 2006: Immigrants have continued to surge into metropolitan New York since 2000, according to census figures released today, and that increase, combined with high birth rates, has elevated the foreign-born and their children in New York City itself to fully 60 percent of the population. . . In the city, the number of people who identified themselves as Mexicans, here legally or not, soared 36 percent in five years.http://www.city-journal.org/html/16_3_ny_cops.htmlSummer 2006: Since 1994, New York City has enjoyed a crime drop unmatched in the rest of the country -- indeed, unparalleled in history . . . From 1990 to 2000, four of the seven major felonies -- homicide, robbery, burglary, and auto theft -- dropped over 70 percent. . . From 2000 to 2005, the city’s crime rate fell another 30 percent.

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max1 5 years, 3 months ago

"once again Maxy1 is posting his irrelevancies again." -slobbering_gnomeI see somebody pulled slobbering_gnome's string again. From the story above: "The state with the next-highest net loss through migration between states was New York, which lost just over 126,000 residents."I wouldn't expect the gnome or jonas to see a connection to those linked stories about domestic shifts in population. Don't cry for California.http://www.bizjournals.com/wichita/stories/2008/12/22/daily7.htmlKansas slipped a spot to the 33rd most populous state since the 2000 census.Texas and California each recorded population increases from 2000 to 2008 exceeding Kansas’ total population.Incidentally, the places I most enjoyed when I lived in California were on the ocean-front between Los Osos and the Big Sur and in the Owens Valley.

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bearded_gnome 5 years, 3 months ago

Ooophelia,welcome to lawrence, and oh yeah in-n-out! wife from so cal would kill for one them burgers. you've probably heard of prunedale. well, welcome to lawrence, dunno how recent you're transplanted. pm me if I can help in the process putting down roots here in lawrence. redwoodcoast has got it right: northern cal, AKA superior California, magnificent. beaches you cannot find the like anywhere in the world. and often not crowded. backpack the sierras, there's beauty. just those people in charge in Sacratomato are completely insane.
ariadne again doesn't know what the heck he's talking about. I was gleaning in Salinas Valley fields, probably before he had his first spoonful of tofu. yes, we know produce comes from there. ever heard of artichokes you environ-mental-architect ariadne/cool/coaltrain/spiderman/spammerman and a couple of other names because you keep violating the system's TOS. getting the produce doesn't mean I can't criticize California, that's incredibly vapid. and I note with humor, once again Maxy1 is posting his irrelevancies again. he can't write for himself so cut-and-paste plus link he hides behind. a very dim bulb. and to think I was just pointing out to him on the thread yesterday that california's gun control was really working so well: 4 homicides in three days in a dusty little backwater central california town. apparently, maxy1 also lacks the capacity to: learn; recognize his errors; benefit from his mistakes; or take in new information. very sad. please put him in that westbound Subaru too. but don't ask him to drive, he's obviously not up to that.

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bearded_gnome 5 years, 3 months ago

LS04 quips that here's quite a panel of experts on California...LS04,take a look at my profile. I agree entirely with the comments you mean to put down. I grew up there, have family there, wife from there, her family there. daily access media from California. Arnold is not, never has been, a conservative. sadly, he's about the best we can hope for in election to the governor's office in California. Ariadne is, as usually, totally out to lunch and on a "rocky mountain high!" the problems are not merely concentrated in the southern california area. Salinas CA, a town not much bigger than Lawrence, had 4 homicides in three days up to yesterday, and today had an amber alert! this is central california, and many of the problems cited in the article were afflicting the Salinas/Monterey county area in the '70s!* how do I know, LS04 might ask...I was there then! my high school was majority hispanic, and most graduates had poor or nonexistent grasp of english. sanctuary cities: LA/SF is directly tied to deaths of Americans. oh LS04 will love this: the loonie uncivil leftists are even more insane in California, just look at what passes the CA legislature. and Mom's "Vote Yes on Prop 8" sign was stolen day before the November election. Jaywalker, ECE, madmike, you're right on boys.

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Calliope877 5 years, 3 months ago

labmonkey,I LOVE that song! I wouldn't mind visiting California, but I don't know if I'd want to live there.

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Liberty_One 5 years, 3 months ago

kmat, if I was a Californian I would be insulted by your little rant. You basically have nothing good to say about the people there at all! And I agree with you, it's a beautiful state, and a great place to visit, but what a crappy place to live.

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labmonkey 5 years, 3 months ago

My favorite song about California.

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labmonkey 5 years, 3 months ago

"Some say a comet will fall from the sky,followed by meteor showers and tidal waves.Followed by fault-lines that cannot sit still, followed by billions of dumbfounded dipsts,And some say the end is near, Some say we'll see Armegaddeon soon.Certainly hope we will, I sure could use a vacation from this:Stupid St, Stupid St. Stupid St."One great big feastering neon distraction, I've a suggestion to keep you all occupied:"Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!"Bombs will fix it all soon, Bombs will hit the ground and put it way it out to be."Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!"Fk L. Ron Hubbard and Fk all his clones,F**k all these gun toting hip gansta wannabes."Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!Learn to Swim!!! Learn to Swim!!!"

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Bossa_Nova 5 years, 3 months ago

let's annex southern california back to mexico and let them have the problem. that hole LA is mexico's second largest city anyways

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hawkperchedatriverfront 5 years, 3 months ago

I want the Orphan Train movement back. This time with aging seniors. Put me on the train to Santa Barbara and some young family can pick me from the stage and let me live in their carriage house. I will spend my afternoons at the museum and be back home promptly when the maid has cleaned my room and has my dinner ready, the tofu T Bone and the acail berry shake.All aboard. Amtrak in Lawrence has a new life again. Thanks Depot Redoux for all you doux.

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ooophelia 5 years, 3 months ago

I moved here from Southern California (don't hate me!)...and yet, everyone I meet is surprised I'm from there. You know, not all of us are rich, stuck-up, blonde, or tan. I grew up in a rural community, and I went to a religious school. I came here to escape everything that's wrong with CA--which I suppose a lot of people are just now figuring out. Now, if I could just get some In-N-Out, Kansas would be perfect. :)

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kmat 5 years, 3 months ago

Keep on laughing at Californians. The whole time you're eating fruit and veggies grown there, TV and movies made there, paying to vacation at the beach or go to Disneyland.California is such a big state with a very diverse population, but morons like you guys have no clue because you have not lived there nor spent a lot of time there.Let's compare KS to Cali. In Cali, they believe in evolution. They have beaches, mountains, deserts, redwoods and awesome forests, skiing, surfing, mountain climbing, white water rafting. Great amusement parks. Fertile farm land that grows more than corn and wheat. People actually want to pay money to visit. Great weather in most of the state. If you want it, it's in Cali.KS - we believe the Bible is fact. We have a few hills and farm flat, boring farm land. Weather sucks a majority of the year. For fun, we can go to a dirty lake or tip cows. People pay to get out of KS.Thank Cali as you sit watching tv tonight, enjoying your dinner (which most likely is made up of items grown in that terrible state you ridicule). Those of us with roots in Cali at least know the truth. There's a reason people pay good money to live there and natives are glad that the rest of us can't afford it so we don't keep moving out there.

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jaywalker 5 years, 3 months ago

Redwood,NoCal is nothing short of God's country, fully agree. I'd love to live up near the redwood's areas, never seen anything so beautiful or felt anything so spiritual in my life, and I've been all over the globe. (Okay, Bora Bora and Tuscany can give NoCal a run, but for the U.S. of A. it's the tops baby!)

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Paul R Getto 5 years, 3 months ago

I remember an old phrase, "Don't Californicate Colorado." It appears some of that is happening. The front range of the Rockies is starting to look like LA, with pine trees instead of palms, and, to complete the analogy, an impending water shortage.

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Flap Doodle 5 years, 3 months ago

The state muffin of California is the bran/raisin muffin.http://www.whatyoudidntwant2know.orgThe state shoelace of California is leather with metal ferrules.http://www.floatingorswimming.org

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max1 5 years, 3 months ago

Components of population change from April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2008Geographic Area: KansasTotal Population Change: 113,318Natural Increase: 130,828Net Migration Total: -21,213 (International: 46,742; Domestic: -67,955)http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/oct/27/kansas_likely_be_giant_retirement_community/Kulcsar said people also shouldn't confuse Kansas' situation with what's happening in Sun Belt states, where well-heeled retirees are moving in. In Kansas the aging is happening in place. The reason older residents make up a larger percentage is because younger people are leaving the state and taking their higher fertility rates with them. The aging of the population is a national trend, but Kulcsar said it is happening faster in Kansas.http://pewhispanic.org/states/?stateid=KSDemographic Profile for Kansas, 2006Median age of all Hispanics 24Median age of Non-Hispanic Whites: 39Mdian age of Non-Hispanic Blacks: 31http://www.kslib.info/sdc/documents/HispanicKansansProfile2008.pdf37.4% of the Hispanic population in Kansas is under age 18, compared to 25.1% of the general Kansas population.

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madmike 5 years, 3 months ago

Probably the only reason that it didn't happen is that neither side wanted custody of San Francisco!

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bobberboy 5 years, 3 months ago

Geeez, why can't they all just move a little furthur west ?

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RedwoodCoast 5 years, 3 months ago

Possibly, Mike, and rightly so.

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cheeseburger 5 years, 3 months ago

"Oh, and how would you folks feel if the remainder of the country thought of Kansas as a big Lawrence?"The rest of the state would object vehemently!!!!

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madmike 5 years, 3 months ago

Redwood, didn't northern California think about breaking away from the southern part once?

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RedwoodCoast 5 years, 3 months ago

You guys need to get away from this stereotype as California being the 'land of fruits and nuts' or 'granola and tofu.' Try telling that to the hill folks of northern California. They'll probably try to run you over in their F-350. I lived in northern California for a while, and I honestly would move back there if a job opened up for me. I've never been to SoCal, and I have absolutely no desire to change that. Oh, and how would you folks feel if the remainder of the country thought of Kansas as a big Lawrence? I'll start spreading the rumor.

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cheeseburger 5 years, 3 months ago

You're right - I forgot! Sorry! Surely there are a few more we could throw in that westbound Subaru also!

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denak 5 years, 3 months ago

I lived in Southern California in the early 1990's. Even then there were these issues. The only difference is now these issues (inflated housing prices, bad schools etc) are effecting the middle class so now it becomes a problem that warrants discussion.California, especially Southern California, should have dealt with these issues long before now, if they had, there wouldn't be the exodus of the middle class that they have now.Dena

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madmike 5 years, 3 months ago

Oh, and for God sake, take Duplenty with you and that should round out the granola and tofu crowd nicely! And they can all go in their Subaru, festooned with political bumper stickers. Let me know your departure date, and i'll ensure you're greeted by highway patrolmen all over the country as you drive through, just my way of saying I love you!!!

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madmike 5 years, 3 months ago

Cheeseburger, don't forget Notnowdear, Confrontation and logicsound.

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cheeseburger 5 years, 3 months ago

To compensate for the mass exodus from California, I propose that Ariadne (aka Sven Erik Alstrom) move there, and take with him Richard (give me all your money) Heckler and Gwen (I can't manage my own affairs but I want to run the city) Klingenberg. That will be a start toward repopulating California while at the same time cleaning up Lawrence!

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Marion Lynn 5 years, 3 months ago

Schwartzeneggery must not be working.

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sfjayhawk 5 years, 3 months ago

Whatever the problems, CA is still one of the most beautiful places on earth and home to much of the USA's capacity for innovation and economic growth. My guess is that the next CA gold rush will be what starts to turn the national/global economy around.

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max1 5 years, 3 months ago

http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/cpquery/?&sid=cp110LchhD&refer=&r_n=sr078.110&db_id=110&item=&sel=TOC_3055&By 2010, an estimated 60 percent of Americans will live along our coasts, which represent less than 17 percent of our land area, excluding Alaska. Approximately 3,000 people move to coastal areas every dayhttp://www.coastandocean.org/coast_v24_no1_2008/print_pages/coastal_air_print.htmThe coastal fringe is home to 53 percent of the United States’ population, a population density pattern that is found all over the planet. In California, 80 percent of us live within 30 miles of the Pacific.

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ariadne 5 years, 3 months ago

you are all most likely eating produce from Californiain your fresh veggies........

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Flap Doodle 5 years, 3 months ago

People leaving Colorado and moving to Kansas is a problem also.

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woodenfleaeater 5 years, 3 months ago

Do I have to like Californians in order to like the California Raisins?

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feeble 5 years, 3 months ago

Hating everything Californian, but loving Ronald Regan, does that seem right to you?

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autie 5 years, 3 months ago

yeah, them califonianians. with their long, shaggy hair and baggy swimmin suits and them surf boards. they need to keep their tubular hippy selfs away from round here.

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jonas_opines 5 years, 3 months ago

Whoa! Some of you should hold off on drinking before noon, you're already losing coherency.

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staff04 5 years, 3 months ago

invictus, so is trying to blame it on liberals. There's a lot of blame to go around. If you can't see that that is what I was pointing out, then maybe you should start looking past your own nose.

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logicsound04 5 years, 3 months ago

Wow, quite a panel of experts we have here in Kansas about the attitudes and dispositions of people from California.It sure is hard to paint the details when you use such a broad brush.madmike, L_O, and ese are some truly sad and bitter individuals.

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Boeing 5 years, 3 months ago

"Anywhere Californians go, crime, taxes and prices go up, and up, and up!"Did a large shipment of Californians come to Lawrence??Zing...

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ese 5 years, 3 months ago

I think bozo is refering to the reproductive habits of the liberal and the unrestrained influx of millions of non-taxpaying illegals.Arnold is a liberal european married into a family of loons. Conservative? Not.

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invictus 5 years, 3 months ago

Staff, trying to blame California’s problem on conservatives is just pathetic. Californians are flakes so they do what is easy, and when things blow up they take the money and run like little children. Then they apply the same formula to their new host body.

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staff04 5 years, 3 months ago

Yeah ese, it is the liberals' fault. Couldn't have anything to do with the fact that the state has been run, for 21 of the last 25 years, by Republican Governors could it? Or that the Federal government under Bush reduced enforcement of illegal imiigration? Couldn't have nuthin' to do with that!You are the problem ese.

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Liberty_One 5 years, 3 months ago

They leave the state, but they bring their destructive political views with them. Like a plague of locusts they ruin one place and move on to the next, never learning their lesson that big government isn't the answer.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 5 years, 3 months ago

How can California possibly have any problems? Doesn't unrestrained growth make everything perfect?

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madmike 5 years, 3 months ago

Anywhere Californians go, crime, taxes and prices go up, and up, and up!

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Chris Ogle 5 years, 3 months ago

I would much rather be leaving CA going somewhere like KS, than leaving KS going to CA. At least home values in CA have been over-valued for decades.

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ese 5 years, 3 months ago

In the 80's the loons infested Washington state and Oregon. That part of the country has never been the same.Liberals are a problem.

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woodenfleaeater 5 years, 3 months ago

I moved from KS to CO for seven years and then back to KS. I know firsthand that CO is overflowing w/ CA transplants, and the people of CO do not like it one bit.

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invictus 5 years, 3 months ago

Third world here we come! Yahoo!I lived in Colorado 12 years ago, Californians were everywhere like locusts. The illegals follow them everywhere they move too.

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boltzmann 5 years, 3 months ago

This article reminds me of the famous Yogi Berra quote about a St. Louis restaurant – "Nobody ever goes there, it's too crowded."

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jaywalker 5 years, 3 months ago

Portland and now Seattle regularly place moratoriums on home building because of Cali-migration. My sis lives in San Diego and makes an awful lot of money as a multi-skilled nurse and there's NO way she could ever buy a house, at least not without a long commute. And the illegal immigrant problem has effected the system to the point that hospitals are going bankrupt. Bad situations all.

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ariadne 5 years, 3 months ago

yes this article highlights the problem of glitz & ditznote that most of the problem is in the southern part of that great state.

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Marion Lynn 5 years, 3 months ago

So The Land of Fruits And Nuts is not all what is is cracked up to be?

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Flap Doodle 5 years, 3 months ago

Californication has been an issue in Colorado for decades.

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ariadne 5 years, 3 months ago

University of Colorado is about 28% California resident students.maybe KU should try to recruit more from CA ?

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