Archive for Thursday, February 26, 2009

Senate budget committee endorses 13 percent higher ed cut

Higher education in Kansas faces a 13 percent budget cut. It comes under a proposal from the Kansas Senate on Thursday.

February 26, 2009

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— Senate budget writers Thursday advanced a recommendation that would cut higher education funding 13 percent.

The move came despite warnings over the past few weeks from Kansas University and other schools that a cut like that would mean layoffs, the elimination of some programs and course offerings, and crowded classes.

Reggie Robinson, president and chief executive officer of the Kansas Board of Regents, said budget cuts deeper than the 7 percent reduction recommended by Gov. Kathleen Sebelius “would have pretty traumatic implications and effects.”

The Senate Ways and Means Committee plan would reduce funding to higher education by $120 million, regents officials said.

“The numbers that I hear coming out of Ways and Means have me concerned,” Robinson said.

Earlier this week, KU officials said significant budget cuts would prevent the school from helping produce the doctors, nurses, engineers and other professionals that the state needs.

“The burden on higher education must not be so severe that we cannot continue to educate and train the very work force we must have to recover from this economic recession,” said Barbara Atkinson, executive vice chancellor of the KU Medical Center and executive dean of the KU School of Medicine.

A cut of that size could also jeopardize a portion of federal stimulus money for Kansas.

Robinson said that under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Kansas higher education institutions can access $82 million in stimulus funds if state funding is maintained at a minimum of 2006 levels.

In Kansas, higher education received $747 million in state general funds in 2006.

A 13 percent cut, on top of a 4.25 percent cut already approved in the current fiscal year, would sink higher education funding below that 2006 amount.

But the committee recommendation would have to be approved by the full Senate and House and signed into law by Gov. Kathleen Sebelius before it would take effect.

Sebelius has said state officials need to reset their budget targets in light of the federal stimulus package. She said she would propose budget amendments today that will take into account the newly approved federal legislation.

Comments

Budgets_Smudgets 6 years, 4 months ago

Let me get this straight. "A 13 percent cut, on top of a 4.25 percent cut already approved in the current fiscal year, would sink higher education funding below that 2006 amount."


It seems to me that when the spending is reduced below the 2006 amount (or the appropriate 2007 amount), that THIS is when a cut really starts. So this "13 percent" and "4.25 percent" are not properly explained here and are likely overstated for shock-and-awe purposes.

ConcernedCynic 6 years, 4 months ago

Budgets_Smudgets (Anonymous) says…

Let me get this straight. “A 13 percent cut, on top of a 4.25 percent cut already approved in the current fiscal year, would sink higher education funding below that 2006 amount.”


It seems to me that when the spending is reduced below the 2006 amount (or the appropriate 2007 amount), that THIS is when a cut really starts. So this “13 percent” and “4.25 percent” are not properly explained here and are likely overstated for shock-and-awe purposes.

HUH...What kinda fuzzy math are you doing?

MyName 6 years, 4 months ago

Okay, you obviously need to learn to do math. A 13% cut means you have 13% less in your budget than you did last time they did the budget. It also means that if they did that cut every year than in 8 years you'd basically have no budget (at least in terms of allocations from the state).

This is even more of a cut when you consider that inflation has grown by 4% or more per year, which means that setting the budget back to below 2006 levels (in nominal terms) means that the purchasing power is 92% of what it would have been in 2006.

MyName 6 years, 4 months ago

@hawkperched...

Please cut some of the employees at KU that voted for the T, that believe that the community owes them a living.

And please try and visualize what this town would be like if there wasn't a University employing thousands of people with good jobs.

Puff_Dragon 6 years, 4 months ago

And please try and visualize what this town would be like if there wasn't a University employing thousands of people with good jobs.

Most of those 'thousands' don't live in Lawrence. Do you think all of that K-10 and Turnpike traffic are coming to work at Wal-Mart or McD's ?

JoRight 6 years, 4 months ago

Wasn't it just announced today that almost 100mil would go to higher education from the stimulus this year? Even more next year?

JoRight 6 years, 4 months ago

Are you just going to troll comments on this article hawk?

Bob_Keeshan 6 years, 4 months ago

Pretty asinine to thumb your nose at the federal dollars.

The federal dollars are there precisely to protect the economy from the harm that would come from large cuts to higher education. The Republicans on the Senate committee apparently could care less about economic development in this state.

More and more, it appears the Republicans in the Kansas Legislature look at states dealing with huge deficits and struggling economies and are upset Kansas isn't in that group.

We want to go in the tank, too! Wait for us!!!

Fatty_McButterpants 6 years, 4 months ago

Shut down KUPD and have LPD patrol campus. That'll cut some of the fat.

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