Advertisement

Archive for Wednesday, February 25, 2009

School ready to rock on standardized tests

A red carpet led to Sunflower School’s multipurpose room for a rocking afternoon Tuesday.

February 25, 2009

Advertisement

Students at Sunflower School got pumped up to take standardized tests by jamming at a Rock Band 2 concert. Price Morgan, a fifth-grader, showed his skills with the game’s guitar.

Students at Sunflower School got pumped up to take standardized tests by jamming at a Rock Band 2 concert. Price Morgan, a fifth-grader, showed his skills with the game’s guitar.

A red carpet led to Sunflower School’s multipurpose room for a rocking afternoon Tuesday.

Student bands from grades three through six took the stage to get their peers excited about state assessment tests.

They jammed to “Eye of the Tiger” and “We Got the Beat” on Rock Band 2, a video game that lets users feel like they’re playing instruments like guitar and drums. Even their teachers took to the stage with a rendition of “One Way or Another.”

And while it was a fun day, the message got through the music.

“We just wanted to bring some fun to a pretty serious time of year,” said Principal Jason Jones, donning a long black wig and gold sunglasses with sideburns. “As long as you do your best, that’s all that counts and we couldn’t ask any more of any child or any adult in our building.”

Austin Mason, the sixth-grade band’s drummer, even dyed the tips of his hair blue for the occasion. “I just felt like getting in the style of rock,” he said.

Students may have enjoyed watching their fellow classmates play along to rock songs, but they knew why they gathered together Tuesday afternoon.

“We have a history of doing good on assessments,” said third-grader Jeffrey Wilson. Because this is his first year of taking the standardized tests, he says he’s a little nervous. “It might be tricky.”

Older students felt better prepared to handle the math, reading, writing and science tests.

“I’ve done it before and I’ve learned more since last year,” said fifth-grader Asha Reeder.

Austin was also ready to tackle the tests. “I’ve been studying for a long time and getting straight A’s,” he said.

The Kansas State Assessments for math and reading can be administered anytime between Feb. 18 and April 14. They are for grades three through eight and are part of the No Child Left Behind Act. The results will determine each school’s adequate yearly progress.

Comments

hawkperchedatriverfront 5 years, 1 month ago

The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out other people's money. Margaret Thatcher

Is USD 497 there yet?

0

JackRipper 5 years, 1 month ago

Isn't it obvious was, if they learned to play real instruments they might start writing their own songs, they might start creating their own versions of songs, the may even look back to pre boomer ages and discover really the boomers didn't advance our culture at all and actually dumbed it down so much that music is what it is today. We can't be teaching kids things like imagination, they must stay within the box and what better way then to also be marketing music that is designated as what they should listen today, frequently, same version even it was recorded in 70's, 80's, or 90's. It is lame, seriously lame. They have done what the can to run jazz and classical music off the radio and out of sight but some of us still do what we can to let the youngsters know, yes, there was life before the boomers.

0

Alexander Neighbors 5 years, 1 month ago

this reminds me of a funny episode of south park where the kids played Guitar Hero, in stead of real instruments. WHY !! WHY !! they need to be taught how to play real instruments ......

0

Multidisciplinary 5 years, 1 month ago

My son transferred away from Sunflower. This would make him sad, as his new school, in his words, never does anything fun like they did at Sunflower! Good one Mr. J!

0

zettapixel 5 years, 1 month ago

Ugh! Teach these poor kids how to play REAL guitar!

0

Music_Girl 5 years, 1 month ago

JackRipper, indeed the public school system is a joke. It's a broken record that most seem to care not to fix except when they are campaigning for office and then magically forget it again. I know several families who are turning to homeschooling as an alternative means to instill good values, encourage creativity and provide a safer environment for learning. Sidenote: if you homeschool, live in a school district and pay taxes, you are entitled to the services they offer such as special education, art and band classes...don't let them bully you into thinking you do not have access. Just my two cents.

0

JackRipper 5 years, 1 month ago

As long as the children are properly learning the revisionist history that music only goes back as far as the boomers where God said, boomers go forth as the only worthy ones and impose upon kids your standards, music, and ideas. Commandment one, consume; commandment two, do not strayth from what the mainstream pr and media tell you; commandment three, thinkth not deeply about the subjects which many are tainted with pre-boomer greatness, only learnth what canth be memorized in order to passth the tests; commandment four, thou shall not challenge or develop opinions that differ from those who are education "experts".

Anyway, it is good to know that not only do the kids get off every Wednesday afternoon to wander the streets but also get to indulge in modern electronic toys at school, no doubt paid with the technology fund. And to think only a few years ago we were cutting band.

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.