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Archive for Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Kansas schools could receive $575 million in federal stimulus funds

February 25, 2009

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Kansas public schools could get upwards of $575 million in federal stimulus funds over two years, officials said Wednesday.

The question now: Will that be enough for schools to avoid budget cuts in the next school year.

“This is a very positive sign but I don’t think schools can completely breathe a sigh of relief,” said Mark Tallman, a lobbyist for the Kansas Association of School Boards.

Because of lagging state tax revenues, some legislators have talked of the need to cut schools by 10 percent or more in the next fiscal year, which starts July 1.

But the federal stimulus plan approved by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama will funnel hundreds of millions of dollars to Kansas schools.

“On a program this large, I don’t recall it ever happening this fast,” said Deputy Education Commissioner Dale Dennis.

Dennis outlined the amount that Kansas will get under the new law.

It includes $106.9 million for special education and $93 million for schools with large numbers of low-income students.

There is also a stabilization fund of $367.4 million that can be used for public schools and higher education. In addition there are smaller amounts for various other programs.

State Sen. Jean Schodorf, R-Wichita, and chair of the Senate Education Committee, said receiving the federal funds in a timely manner may avoid school layoffs.

Sebelius has said she will provide a revised budget to lawmakers by the end of the week to take into account some of the new federal stimulus monies.

In addition to the education funds, the state will receive $440 million in additional federal monies for Medicaid.

Comments

dpowers 5 years, 1 month ago

shardwurm, I invite you to come into my second grade classroom in eudora and see what is going on! If you don't think that class size has any impact on education, that tells me that you don't have a clue! It has a tremendous impact, especially in this time of inclusion.

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ArumerZwarteHoop 5 years, 1 month ago

Aren't all students "low-income students"?

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tameli 5 years, 1 month ago

Please, feel free to sit up in your nice offices and watch classrooms instead of actually doing your job while I become homeless from just being laid off from my teaching job bc of budgets cuts.

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Shardwurm 5 years, 1 month ago

Schools would be fine if they were managed better and people would stop listening to the scare tactics laid on them by the education industry.

Your children aren't going to become flaming idiots because of classroom size.

Tell you what....let's put webcams in every classroom that parents can log into from work to watch what actually goes on every day. I think that may enlighten a lot of people about what we're actually paying for.

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Moderateguy 5 years, 1 month ago

"and $93 million for schools with large numbers of low-income students" also known as "redistribution of wealth." Whether its trickle down, or build up from the bottom, the middle class is going to get the short end of the stick. At some point, we're going to need a revolution.

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hawkperchedatriverfront 5 years, 1 month ago

The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money.

Margaret Thatcher

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Kuku_Kansas 5 years, 1 month ago

The fact is, the education programs are not self-sustainable from state tax revenues alone.

If the state is expecting federal bailouts every two years to barely maintain operations...

...then tough times are coming ahead for the next generation of KS students.

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Jersey_Girl 5 years, 1 month ago

You obviously have nothing to do with education.

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XD40 5 years, 1 month ago

Kansas should do the honorable thing and refuse to accept these pork tainted funds.

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