Archive for Wednesday, December 9, 2009

LMH doctor offers advice about hypothermia

A row of evergreen trees provided a dark background to display falling snowflakes, and a telephoto lens helped make the flakes appear larger in this winter playground scene. Without a darker background, photographs of falling snow in a gray sky or against a snowy landscape will be hard to spot.

A row of evergreen trees provided a dark background to display falling snowflakes, and a telephoto lens helped make the flakes appear larger in this winter playground scene. Without a darker background, photographs of falling snow in a gray sky or against a snowy landscape will be hard to spot.

December 9, 2009

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Anyone can get hypothermia, which occurs when the body gets cold and loses heat faster than the body can make it.

It is an emergency condition and can quickly lead to unconsciousness and death if heat loss continues.

Dr. Brian Hunt, of Lawrence Memorial Hospital’s emergency department, said it is important to know the symptoms and get treatment quickly.

Early symptoms are: shivering; cold, pale or blue-gray skin; apathy; poor judgment; mild unsteadiness in balance or walking; slurred speech; and numb hands and fingers.

Late symptoms include: trunk of body is cold to touch; muscles become stiff; slow pulse; shallow and slower breathing; weakness; sleepiness; confusion; loss of consciousness; shivering which may not stop if body temperature drops below 90 degrees.

Hunt said treatment for mild symptoms include getting out of the cold, wet environment, using warm blankets, heaters and hot water bottles. Moderate to severe hypothermia generally is treated in the hospital with warmed intravenous fluids and warmed, moist oxygen in addition to other methods.

Comments

GardenMomma 5 years, 6 months ago

Ironic or planned that this article occurs on the very same day we have the coldest temperatures so far this winter and the wind chill today is below zero?

riverdrifter 5 years, 6 months ago

I was 17 ft. up in a tree stand hunting deer for 3 hours this evening. No problem if you have accumulated all the clutter needed: King of the Mountain, Yukon Survivors, etc. The deer were on the move, too, big time. They adapt quickly to cold weather and get along just fine. Tonight they were hoofing acorns out lickety-split and wolfing them down.

LadyJ 5 years, 6 months ago

riverdrifter-how did you keep your toes warm? Have never found a pair of socks that help. Have insulated boots too.

riverdrifter 5 years, 6 months ago

LadyJ, socks ain't your problem. Boots. I use pac boots that have foam, not felt liners. They are bulkier & make you look like the Michelin Man, but that's what will keep you comfortable & on the stand, at the football game, whatever. When driving though, it's best to shuck the boots & drive home with just the liners on or change out to street shoes.

firemedic301 5 years, 6 months ago

Ladyj, Sam's club has those mini hand warmers and I stick them in toes of my insulated hunting boots. They stay toasty even in this weather and they're cheap for the amount you get

riverdrifter 5 years, 6 months ago

Multi: No. Only saw small bucks. I was frozen to the seat, anyway! It was a long creaky climb down outta there, BTW.

GardenMomma 5 years, 6 months ago

Marion, I know the article was planned....

GardenMomma 5 years, 6 months ago

You know squat about me. I don't make assumptions about you.

My post is that I found it ironic that the article was planned.

Yes, it's great advice. I never questioned that.

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