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Archive for Sunday, August 16, 2009

Woodstock stockpile: New works accompany festival’s anniversary

August 16, 2009

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On the street

What are you reading?

‘UFOs and the National Security State’ by Richard M. Dolan. I’ve been thinking about this kind of stuff lately. … My dad says he saw one once.

More responses

Do aging baby boomers need a major nostalgia fix for the 40th anniversary of Woodstock? Publishers must think so — they’re bringing out a raft of new books on the world-famous music festival.

Overviews:

“Woodstock: Three Days That Rocked the World,” edited by Mike Evans and Paul Kingsbury (Sterling, $35). A 288-page hardcover coffee-table volume that is the most comprehensive offering.

“Woodstock: Peace, Music and Memories,” by Brad Littleproud and Joanne Hague (Krause Publications, $24.99 paper). This 256-page trade paperback covers the entire festival, but its unique aspect is as a guide to Woodstock memorabilia.

Personal accounts

“The Road to Woodstock,” by Michael Lang with Holly George-Warren (Ecco, $29.99). The festival, according to one of the event’s promoters. Lang takes credit for aspects of the festival that others agree he had nothing to do with.

“The Pied Piper of Woodstock,” by Artie Kornfeld (fall release from Spirit of Woodstock LLC, $30). Another of the festival promoters, who was also a successful music producer, describes the growth of the rock culture. But 120 of the 365 pages are about Woodstock.

“Max B. Yasgur: The Woodstock Festival’s Famous Farmer,” by Sam Yasgur (Self-published later this month, $25; purchase details at syasgur hvc.rr.com). A 300-page biography by his son with heavy emphasis on the festival.

“Woodstock Vision: The Spirit of a Generation,” by Elliott Landy (Backbeat, $35). Landy was the official festival photographer and most of the 224 pages showcase his work. Almost half the shots were taken at Woodstock.

“Taking Woodstock: A True Story of a Riot, a Concert, and a Life,” by Elliot Tiber with Tom Monte (Square One, $15.95). Tiber is the person who lured the festival promoters to Bethel, and his account, reissued by the Garden City Park publisher, is the basis for the new Ang Lee movie of the same title.

Oral histories

“Woodstock Revisited: 50 Far Out, Groovy, Peace-Loving, Flashback-Inducing Stories from Those Who Were There,” edited by Susan Reynolds (Adams Media, $12.95). Enough said.

“Back to the Garden: The Story of Woodstock,” by Pete Fornatale (Touchstone, $24.99). The DJ-music historian interviews festival artists and organizers.

“Woodstock: The Oral History, 40th Anniversary Edition,” by Joel Makower (SUNY Press, $19.95). The organizers tell their stories.

“Roots of the 1969 Woodstock Festival: The Backstory to “Woodstock,” by Weston Blelock and Julia Blelock (Woodstock Arts, $19.95). Transcript of 2008 discussion about how musical “Sound-Outs” in town of Woodstock inspired the ’69 event in Bethel.

Musical focus

“By the Time We Got to Woodstock,” by Bruce Pollock (September release from Backbeat Books, $19.95). Chronicles outdoor concerts that preceded and followed Woodstock.

For children

“Max Said Yes! The Woodstock Story,” by Abigail Yasgur and Joseph Lipner with illustrations by Barbara Mendes (Change the Universe Press, $17.95). The 32 colorful pages explain the Woodstock aura to the next generation of flower children.

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